Obituary of Mrs. M.M. Justice –  who died at Coalfield, Dec. 3, 1928  Mrs. Justice was born May 18, 1846, in Anderson County, Tennessee near the little station known as Marlow, in that county; her maiden name was Telitha Caroline Brummitt.  Her father’s names was James Brummitt and her mother’s name was Serelda Brown Brummitt.
Mrs. Justice leaves to mourn her loss her husband, M.M. Justice, who is in his 79th  year, and the following children:  Mrs. Florence Cheek of  Coal Hill, Mrs. R.A. Sisson of Oliver Springs, Mrs. Arpie Jackson of Coalfield, Judge S.H. Justice of Wartburg, and Horace Justice of Coalfield and three infant children who died in early life, making eight children born to this union.  She is also survived by sixteen grand-children and twenty great-grandchildren, and one brother, the Rev. W.R. Brummitt of Oliver Springs; and one sister, Mrs. Mary A. Freybarger, living at Hamilton, Ohio.  Mrs. Justice was 13 years of age when the war between the North and the South was declared, and many times during her life, while in a reminiscent mood, she would tell of the many struggles and trials that she had undergone during that war.  In Feb. 1862, her father was shot and killed through a crack in the door during the early part of the night, after a hard days work clearing a new ground, while he had one of his younger children in his arms.  At the report of the gun the father of Mrs. Justice dropped the child from his arms and fell with his hands in the fire.  There being no one in the house at this time, except the father of Mrs. Justice, her mother, who was very ill and confined to her bed; the little child and Mrs. Justice, who was then only 13 years of age.  After the fatal shot had been fired, Mrs. Justice locked her arms under the arms of her dead father, pulling him out of the fire and straightening out his lifeless body on the floor.  At this time the mother of Mrs. Justice thought in all probability that their house was surrounded by enemies, so she ordered that the light be extinguished and the fire covered up until an investigation could be made and the neighbors notified.  In this condition, Mrs. Justice with her sick mother in bed kept a vigilant watch through the night while her father lay a lifeless corps on the floor before them.
During the year 1862, while the war between the states was still raging, Mrs. Justice’s older brother Wiley Brummitt, had enlisted in the Union Army nad was stationed at Fishing Creek, Ky., and while there got a permit or furlough to visit his wife, mother and sisters in Anderson County, Tenn.  He came home and stayed a few days and while returning back to his regiment across the mountain and down New River, he was encountered by a bunch of guerillas, whose purpose was to loot, steal and kill and the ran Mr. Brummitt into the river and shot him in the face; then it was that Mrs. Justice, though a girl in her ealy teens, was again called to a trying ordeal.  She walked from Anderson County by way of Blowing Springs, where Winrock mines are now situated, but arrived after her brother had been buried in the old White Grave Yard in the 10th district of Anderson County on New River.  She met her duties boldly, and got her brother’s haver sack, as she always called it, his shot pouch and army rifle, after which she wended her way back across the mountain to her old home near Marlow.
She had a brother names Gilbert Brummitt, who died at Somerset, Ky., while serving in the Union Army.  She had another brother names Moses Brummitt, who also was a soldier in the Union Army, who was captured by the Confederate soldiers and imprisoned on Belle Isle, who died there during that great struggle.  W.R. Brummitt who is now living at Oliver Springs, served in the Union Army, 3 years, 7 months and 17 days, and was honorable discharged.  He is now in this 85th year.  Mrs. Justice had a sister by the name of Martha Brummitt, who married one Daniel Jones of Morgan County; this sister died in Roane Ciounty many years ago.  She had two younger brothers, namely, James and Rufus, who were not old enough to enlist in the army, both have been dead several years.
Mrs. Justice was a member of the Baptist Church for near 60 years; she was a strong believer in the Baptist faith, but first of all she believed in God.  She loved her family and her friends and was ever ready to speak a good word to those in trouble.  She was married to M.M. Justice, Nov. 26, 1871 by Squire Thos. Davis, who was one of the old pioneers of this county.
Mrs. Justice used to tell of the many hardships and privations that she and the other members of her family were subjected to during the Civil War, and on one occasion, she told of her mother owning a find young mare, and while the Confederate soldiers were passing through the country, she bridled and led this young mare away from the main road out into the forest and kept her there all night for fear she would be taken away from them.  She said that this young mare could hear the other horses passing the road and would attempt to squeal or nicker to them, as she called it, and at each time she would take her bonnet and wrap it around the mare’s mouth and nostrils to keep the soldiers who were passing the road from hearing the squeal of the animal.
Mrs Justice had many friends and no enemies in so far as we know, and will be long remembered and never forgotten.

(From the Morgan County News dated: December 13, 1928)

 

NEWS CLIPPINGS – 1916


Central High School Honor Roll

First Grade:         Iva Levan, Henry Heidel
Second Grade:    Jessie Cooper
Third Grade:        Ella Crenshaw, Labon Summer, Mary Summer Iva Redmon
Fourth Grade:      Elsia Moates
Fifth Grade:         Lorene Davis, Nellie Hall, Parlia Henry
Seventh Grade:    Merida Byrd, Dixie Davis, Charley Newberry, Madge Ott, Ray Schubert, Roy Schubert,
Ida Taylor, Thelma Zumstein
Eight Grade:         Lee Davis, Marie Heidel, Edna Human, Eva Summer

HIGH SCHOOL HONOR ROLL
First year:         Orpha Clark
Second year:    John Joyner
Third Year:      Herbert Bales, Ed Conificius, Netta Clark, Lawrence Newberry, Blanche Ott

DOMESTIC SCIENCE
Cooking:  Eva Summer, Metta Clark, Otto Schubert
Sewing:    Anna Mae Joyner, Lesie Dean Levan, Emma Summer, Ida Taylor, Marie Heidel, Eva Summer James


 

 

Joyner and Pointer Barger, candidates for member of the County Board of Education, were calling on the voters.

Henry Davis and son, Vanus, went out to Marlow Friday to attend the funeral of Lum Smith.

Capt. T.G. Van Meyers, representating the French government, is spending the week in our burg purchasing mules and horses for army service.

TO ALL CONCERNED:
By reason of impending strike, effective at once, the O.N.O. & T.P., A.G.S.S.H. & N.E., C.B & C., and Belt of Chattanooga will not accept from shippers any shipment of live stock or perishable freight unless it can reach final destination by regular or usual schedule before September 2, 1916.
Any shipments of explosives or highly inflamable material will not be received.
Please see that shippers and receivers are notified by telephone or otherwise at once, also that local newspapers are given notice so that the informationmay be made available to all concerned.
(Signed)
W.T. Caldwell

The above information was added June 24, 2000……….


Marriage Licenses  and Marriages

January, 1916
Sam Key to Sarah Jane Potter
Lonas Armes to Dallas Dangher

February, 1916
Milton Gray to Mary Hedgecoth
Frank Douglas to Leona Stringfield

August, 1916
W.M. Greder to Stella Underwood
Herbert Staples to Bethie Brasel
Elijha Clark to Bessie Hill

October 1916
Hubert Freels and Della York, 9/28/1916
Martin Redmon and Della Arms
Andrew McDormick and Luverna Zumstein
George Bune and Wettha Jones
Harold Adcock and Mattie Bingham
Reuben Morgan and Lena Wehlhorn  (Mehlhorn?)
Ola Howard and Luverna Cox
(week of 10/20/1916)

December 1916
W. E. Kennedy & Ida Ridener
Geo Leach & Myrtle Gooch
Harry Carlton Jones & Ova Marie Creekmore
Joseph Cox & Dorothy Hall
James Back & Della Adkin
Haywood Wilson & Freddie Butler
Riley Justice & Myrtle Stewart -(see below)
Harry Kreis &  Ida Brasel
William T. Walton & Sarah L. Kinker
Wiley England & Flora Guffey
C. C. Todd & Matilda Jones
John Bradshaw & Maggie Jones
Daniel Webb & Othena Hall
G. Walker & Jennie Wright
Oscar Byrd & Anna McNeil
Chas Walls & Grace Butler
George Heidle & Etta Brown
L. E. Thornton & Oma Jackson
H. Conrad Wilson & Bessie Human
N. J. Stonecipher & Tressie Patrick
Riley JUSTICE and Myrtle STEWART were married by Esq. HOLDER, Dec. 16 1916, on the Pike a short distance east OF Wartburg near Gus Heidel’s.  They were sitting in an auto when the Esquire drove up, married them in short order as he was carrying the mail and could not tarry long on the job.

Harry  KREIS and Ida L. BRASEL were married Christmas morning and left immediately for Knoxville..
_____________________________________
OBITUARIES-1916

James H. GALLOWAY died Jan. 6th at the home of his daughter,
Mrs. Griffith after a long illness.

Martin BROWN died in Atlanta, Ga. Jan 15th with pneumonia. He was a soldier in the US Service. His body was shipped to Burrville for
burial. He leaves a father and mother, two sisters and six brothers.

Martin C. BROWN, died Jan. 16, 1916 at Camp Gordon.  He was formerly from Burrville. He was the son of Mr. & Mrs. Albert Brown who lived at Burrville.  Cause of death was pneumonia.

James T. BUCHANAN, a miner about 30 years of age from Dayton was killed in the CONGER MINES Wednesday by falling slate. He had worked here only two days.  The body was prepared for burial and sent to Dayton for interment.  He leaves a wife and two children. (August 1916)

P.J. CALLAHAN, 72, of Chattanooga died, 8/10/1916 at his home.  Burial in Cincinnatti, Aug 13, 1916.  He was for many years the
passenger conductor between Somerset and Chattanooga.

Infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Jack BROWN was buried Aug. 14, 1916 at M.E. Church Cemetery Sunbright.

William HOWARD, born in Morgan Co., May 16, 1831, died Oct 17, 1916. He married Sarah Williams in 1858. They had seven children, 5 survive.  daughters, Mrs. T. C. DILLON. Mrs. Wilburn STOWERS, and Mrs. Gusty HOWARD.  Sons, Andrew and Perry Howard. Mr.  HOWARD joined the Union Army at the outbreak of the Civil War. Burial in Lavender Cem. Deer Lodge

Jim WOODRUFF, who a week ago stabbed to death JOHN McGINLY on the streets of Harriman, was arrested Saturday at Rockwood.  His preliminary trial was held Saturday afternoon and he was bound over to court with out bond.  He claims the stabbing was in self defense. (week or 8/13/1916)

DEATH OF ELIHU HOLDER
On July 25, 1916, Elihu HOLDER passed over the divide to the great beyond.  He was in his 73rd year. He was the oldest of seven children and was married in 1869 to Miss Laura SILCOX who died in 1882. There were six children to this union, two survive.About three years later he married Miss Sarah NICHOLS. There were three children to this union. He leaves a wife, 5 sons and 2 daughters. His remains were laid to rest in Liberty Cemetery on July 26.

Mrs. Jeff LAVENDER died week of Aug. 24, 1916.  She suffered a stroke about 2 weeks ago and never recovered.  She was 72 years old.  Burial in Pine Flat Cemetery.

Miss COLLINS of Hillsboro, Ohio. She owned several houses in Deer Lodge and spent the winters among us. (8/1916)

Joe W. LINDSAY of Chattanooga was killed Sunday in a head on collison between his motor cycle and a street car.  He was about 30
years of age and leaves a wife, father and mother, S.W. LINDSAY, and a sister. (8/31/1916)

Mr. HUNT of Michigan who bought the Thomas POTTER place near J.W. BURNS, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor on Saturday evening.  He lived until Monday. (week of10/5/1916)

Mr. M. W. BUXTON, age 91, departed this life Oct.16, 1916. His wife, four sons, and one daughter are left to mourn his loss.

Mr. Joe THORNTON died Oct. 8, 1916. He  leaves a wife, sons and daughters to mourn his  departure.  His remains were laid to
rest in Liberty Cemetery.

Mrs. E. S. JONES. (week of,10/19/1916) burial in Winfield.

The three month’s old child of Esquire R. A. CROSS died last Sunday morning.  The afflicted couple have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement (week of 11/16/1916)

The sad news of the death of Rev. Joseph HERMIE, pastor of St. Anne Church at Deer Lodge and Stowers, was learned Monday morning. Interment in Philadelphia. (week of 12/14/1916)

Mr. A. HENKLE, a well known former resident of Glades, who moved to Chicago a few months ago, died suddenly Dec. 6, 1916.

Aunt Margaret JONES, wife of Mr. W. D. JONES died at Montgomery in her 78th year. She was born in Russell County Va., to Mr. & Mrs. CROMWELL, (Ed Note-Johnson and Anna JACKSON CROMWELL).  She married Daniel GARRETT in 1859. He was captured during the Civil War and died at Belle Isle. Daughter, Mrs. Chas. (Julia) BROWN survives of two children. June 27 she married W. D. JONES. One daughter, who married Wm. HOLSTON died about three years ago. Interment in Lutheran Cemetery. (week of Dec. 28, 1916)

Mrs. Dave JONES who lives close to the White School House, fell dead between her home and a neighbors on Tuesday evening.  A couple of boys who were near by heard her scream and saw her fall.  They ran to her aid but found her dead when they reached her side. (12/1916)

The sad news of the death of Carl SWIFT, which occured last Thursday at their home. He was a brother of one of our former Music teachers, Miss Lillian SWIFT.  (12/1916)

Aunt Eliza DAVIS died at the home of her son. J. M. DAVIS on Dec. 24, 1916 at the ripe age of 80 years
and was buried on Dec 25, in Burrville Cemetery. December, 21, 1916

We regret to give up another of our citizens, (Rugby), but the death angel came to the home of Mr. S.H. GILES and took away Mrs. Sol Giles from us.

OTHER NOTES AND NEWS 
January 1916
The weather has registered from five to seven below zero more than once.  Folks are doing with out coal because ice-covered hills are making it difficult to deliver.

August 10, 1916
Bert STEPHENS, who has been in the Navy for the past eight years, made this burg a call last week.  He was visiting his grandmother, Mrs. R.A. DAVIS.

Last Monday Aug. 7, was surely Birthday Day in Sunbright. On that day Hon. Wm. BULLARD celebrated his 56th, Mrs. Bettee ENGLAND her 44th, Chas T. SUMMERS his 40th, Arthur JUSTICE, 22nd, Miss Bessie
HUMAN her 17th and Elizabeth NEIL her 10th birthday.

Mr. Harry HALL and wife are slowly improving from typhoid fever.

Prof. John ALBERTSON and Miss Eva GALLOWAY opened school here on Monday morning of this week (8/10/1916)

Frank DOUGLAS  has given up his position at Catoosa and returned to the Emory.

Little Albert GARRETT is still peddling at Annadell.

Burglars entered the post office here (Coalfield) Friday night and relieved the cash drawer of about $100.  A box of pennies and the stamps were not molested. (8/10/1916)

A horse belonging to Sam WALLS near here was stolen Saturday night and ridden to Petros and turned loose.  Mr. Walls found his horse at Stephen’s Switch with one eye knocked out and otherwise badly abused.  Coalfield (8/10/1916)

Geo. P. McKETHUM and wife, who have been visiting his father, E.H. McKETHUM, have returned to their home in Cario, Ill, on Aug. 17th.

S.T. KIMBELL has purchased 300 acres on the pike road near Sunbright for $4,500. Property is advancing by leaps and bounds along the fines pike in the county!

August 24, 1916
Miss Lina ZUMSTEIN, 1st Asst. teacher in the Sunbright  High School, arrived here last Saturday.

One of the finest plantations in the county passed hands last week — The MAGNOLIA PLANTATION at Stowers formerly owned by S.T. KIMBALL.  Comprised in this estate is upwards of 2000 acres, residences, cleared lands, store buildings and barns.  A large Polish settlement adjoins this estate and a Catholic Church is on the property. The residence of James J. ENGLAND at West

Sunbright was destroyed by fire Sunday night about 8:30.   The fire was caused by a defective flue. August 31, 1916

Several investors here from Champaign, Ill. are expected here this wee to look at land around Stowers.

Next Saturday will see the big auction sale at Glades when Adolph HEINKLE will sell out. They are moving back to Chicago.

Fourteen cars of railroad ties were shipped from Sunbright last week.

Paul T. JONES, president of the Barbor Coal Co., spent Saturday and Sunday in Harriman.

October 5, 1916
Mr. M HUNT  of Michigan, who bought the Thomas Potter place near JH.W. Burns;, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor on Sat. evening last.  He lived until Monday noon.

Roy HOWARD, son of Trustee Howard, blew in from Chicago Monday.
We reckon that the cold chilly winds off Lake Michigan were too much for his liking.

Rev. CALDWELL, (the circuit rider) of Burrville and his father of Lenoir City and Rev. A. C. PETERS were here Sunday.  The elder Caldwell preached an interesting sermon.

BOYLE FARM SOLD
S.T. KIMBELL of the Kimbell Land Agency closed up the largest sale of the year in selling the BOYLE Farm of 3500 acres for Oscar PETERSON to Judge C. A. BALES of Jefferson County. This plantation was founded by Lord MONTGOMERY BOYLE of London, England, who invested largely in the county in the early ‘80s, (1880s) together with the English investors who founded the Rugby settlement.

October 12, 1916
Henry LILES suffered the loss of his house by fire a few days since.  The fire was accidental.

Jesse QUINN went to Michigan as an escort with the body of Ben HUTCHINGS, where the remains will be buried.

Edgar RUFFNER and Edgar HOPPER left Monday for Morristown where they expect to attach themselves to some kind of a job.

Mrs. C. PETERS had a serious runaway a few days ago.  A young horse hitched to a buggy became frightened and ran away throwing the occupants from the buggy, considerable injuring the buggy. No one was seriously hurt.

Squire ADCOCK”S court was the scene Tuesday of a very exciting lawsuit, which as to nature is perhaps not duplicated in the court procedure of the county.  Harry GOUGE, who lives near here, was arraigned on the charge of a very grave statutory offence.  The alleged victim and accuser was little Miss Gertrude McDANIEL, aged 13 years.The accused was sent to jail until the next term of Circuit Court at Wartburg.

October 26, 1916
Earnest BARDILL, a quiet farmer of the Lone Mt. community of planters, was arrested and brought to town and tried at the Court House on Monday before Bruno SCHUBERT, a Justice of the Peace, the indictment charging Bardill with Forgery.  The proof showed a check drawn on the Oakdale Bank & Trust Co. by Riley JESTES to Enoch BARDILL and by Enoch BARDILL endorsed.  The check was dated Oct. 8th 1916 and was paid by said bank on Oct. 12, 1916, the check being for $10.00.  The warrant was sworn out by Riley JESTES who denied writing the check and charging said BARDILL with forging his name and getting the money on it.  The defendant was bound over to court, in $1000 bonds which he made and returned to his home that
evening.

Nov. 2, 1916
Mr. John KREIS took a load of potatoes to Oakdale Tuesday for Ben BYRD who had sold them to J.C. ALLEY at $1.00 per bushel.  He took another load today.

TWO MORE STEEL BRIDGES
The county Court met in special session and passed a resolution authorizing the Bridge Commission to let contracts for two more steel bridges to built across Clear Fork, one at Peters Ford and one at Brewster Ford. (re-print from Fentress Co. Gazette)

We regret to have to announce that about 3 o’clock Tuesday afternoon the house of Mr. Pointer BARGER, who lives on the Wartburg and Petros Road about nine miles from Wartburg was totally destroyed by fire.  Mr. Barger is a poor man and has a large family who are turned out of home with only the clothes they had on.

November 16, 1916
The High School Students, who are under the supervision of Miss Sadie RAMSEY, will give a two hour play on the evening of Dec. 9, at 7 o’clock in the high school auditorium.

On Sunday last, St. Peter left the Gates of Heaven ajar and a bright little angel boy, wended its way down to earth and took up its abode in the happy home of Mr. & Mrs. J.E. TANNER We are please to announce that mother and child are doing nicley. November  30, 1916

The H & F E E R R is having some wells dug near the depot, and will erect a water tank here. (Coalfield)

Mart VANN, our barber, fell from his barn loft a few mornings since and sustained some very bad bruises, though no serious injuries.

R.D. McGLOTHIN, aged about 60 years, who is subject to epilepsy, fell from a railroad trestle a week ago during one of his attacks and was very seriously hurt. Since the accident he has been scarcely in a conscious condition and his life is dispaired of.

John B. YORK accidently fell from his wagon last Friday. The wagon which was loaded with crossties ran over him, dislocating his left shoulder and otherwise injuring him..  Drs JONES and EASLEY were called and soon set the bones.Mr. YORK is some better and at this writing is confined to his room.

There is quite a building boom in Wartburg. Some are building, while others putting up additons.

December 14, 1916
Mr. Clarence Brown met with a painful accident last Satruday in falling from a wagon he dislocated his elbow. (Burrville)

Mr. A. HENKLE a well known former resident of Glades, who moved to Chicago a few months ago, died suddenly Dec. 6th from the effects of a bad cold which settled in his lungs. (Deer Lodge)

During the sitting of the Grand Jury this week, the case of Ernest BARDILL, which was a bound over case from Squire SCHUBERT’S court held Oct. 23, in which Mr. BARDILL was held for his appearance at this term of court on a charge of passing a bogus check.The Grand Jury, after examing the witnesses, decided that Mr. Bardill was not guilty and refused to indict him.  Mr. BARDILL is a quiet and respectable citizen of the Lone Mountain Country.

JUST A WORD FROM RUGBY
We regret to learn that Friday, Dec. 22, will be the last day of our school here for the winter.  Our school has been taught this term by Mr. William Powell of the third district. Mr. Powell psosesses all the qualities which go to make a successful teacher.
————————
December 21, 1916 – Letters from SANTA:
Dear Santa: I am 5 years old, and of course I want lots and lots of things, but I am just going to ask for the things I want most and I will then expect to get them.  Please bring me a toy piano, a big doll and a teddy bear.  I was about to forget to tell you to bring me some irons to iron my doll clothes.  I shall expect what I’ve asked for, with lots of candy, oranges and apples.  Love to you and Mrs. Santa.     Charlotte Aytes, Frankfort.
—————————
Dear Santa, I am a little boy 5 years old and I want you to bring me a little wagon and a toy dog and a horse and some apples, oranges candy and nuts.  The is all I will ask for this time. Good By.
Granville McPETERS
———————————-
Please Dear Santa: Bring us a doll, a little wagon and candy,
oranges and nuts and don’t forget our little sister Ava.  Please bring us a little lamp too.
Wilma and Lela Stone, Rockwood, Rte 3
———————
Dear Santa; I am a little girl 10 years old.  Please bring me a pair of gloves and a handkerchief box, and don’t forget my little sister, Tressie, and bring her an unbreakable doll and some candy; so good by Santa,
Georgia Dilbeck, Wartburg.
———————
We will pay 30 cents for Eggs and 25 cents per
pound for Butter, in cash.  SCHUBERT’S STORE.

December 28, 1916
A CARD FROM THE EDITOR OF THE BANNER
“A.F. NACE, editor of the Morgan County Banner at Oakdale, has been called to his home near York, Pa, hence this week’s issue of the Banner will be omitted.  Nr. Nace was called to his home to attend the funeral of his dear mother.

Mr. A. HONEYCUTT has been at Knoxville for the past two weeks
on the Federal Jury.

Mr. J. S. GREER has been suffering for two weeks with a sprained wrist which was caused while cranking his machine.  The little Ford kicked!

Mr. J.M. PETETT and family have returned from California.

Mrs. W.B. CRENSHAW and the children spent Christmas evening and
Tuesday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson ROBINSON.


COURT RECORDS -- 1916
August 10, 1916
Squire Adcock’s court was the scene of a lively legal tilt here Saturday.  
The MORRISON Brothers, proprietors of the Oliver Springs Brick Yard, were on trial for felonious assualt on William Settle.  The evidence pointed in opposite directions and the defendents were acquitted.

October 12, 1916
Squire ADCOCK’S court was the scene Tuesday of a very exciting lawsuit, which as to
nature is perhaps not duplicated in the court procedure of the county.  Harry GOUG
who lives near here, was arraigned on the charge of a very grave statutory offence.  The
alleged victim and accuser was little  Miss Gertrude McDANIEL, age 13 years.  The crime
is said to have been committed Saturday evening week near the Prudential Mines. 
Gouge was arrested by Constable W.H. WARD and brought before Equires ADCOCK 
and WEBSTER who after hearing the evidence of the little girl and  Gouge’s father,
committed the accused to jail until the next term of Circuit Court at Wartburg.  The State
was represented by Harvey Ward and the defendent by J.M. DAVIS and C.C.JACKSON

October 26, 1916
   BOUND OVER TO THE CRIMINAL AND LAW COURT
   Earnest BARDILL, a quiet farmer of the Lone Mountain community of planters, was
arrested and brought to town and tried at the Court House in Wartburg on Monday of this
week, before Bruno SCHUBERT, a Justice of the Peace, the indictment charging
BARDILL with forgery.  
  The proof showed that a check was drawn on the Oakdale Bank & Trust Co, by Riley
JESTES to Enoch BARDILL  and by Enoch BARDILL endorsed.The check was dated
Oct. 8th 1916, and was paid by said bank on Oct. 12th, 1916, the
check being for $10.00.
   The warrent was sworn out by Riley JESTES who denied writing the check; and
charging said BARDILL with forging his name and getting the money on it.
  Since a Justice of the Peace tries such cases on the probable cause of guilt and not upon
the reasonable doubt, the defendant was bound over to court, in $1,000 bonds which he
made and returned to his home that evening.

December, 14, 1916
  During the sitting of the Grand Jury this week the case of Ernest BARDILL, which was
a bound over case from Squire SCHUBERT’S court held Oct. 23, in which Mr.
BARDILL was held for appearance at this term of court on a charge of passing a bogus
check upon the bank at Oakdale.  The grand Jury, after examing the witnesses decided
that Mr. Bardill was not guilty and refused to indict him.  He is a quiet and respectable
citizen of the Lone Mountain country.

CRIMINAL AND LAW COURT 
Met Dec. 11, 1916 with Judge HICKS on the bench and  States Attorney W.H. BUTTRAM and Charles W. SUMMER, Clerk in attendance.

The following cases were heard and disposed of:

State vs:

W W CHRISTMAS, case nollied on costs. 
James BRANDENBURG, murder, continued 
James COFFEE, carrying arms, continued 
R. ANGEL and Chas. ARP, felonious assault, 
not guilty 
A.M. CARDELL carrying arms, not guilty 
William GOOCH, felonious assault, found 
guilty of simple assault, fined $40 and costs. 
Leon PEMBERTON and Abe LAMBERSON 
unlawfully selling liquor, continued 
Charles ROGERS, cruelty to animals, nullied 
J.F. EVANS, carrying weapons, continued by State.

State vs: 
W. COFFEY, keeping female dog, $5.00 and cost. 
Jas HANSFORD, drunkeness, nullie on cost 
Walter Williams,  nullied on costs 
Arch WEAVER,unlawfully selling liquor, fined $50 and sixty days. 
Adam DAUGERTY, carrying arms, fined $50 and thirty days. 
Adam DAUGERTY, selling liquor to minors, fined $25 and cost. 
Gilbert LANGLEY, carry arms, fined $50 and cost. 
A.P. GOLDSTON, et al forfiture, nullied on cost. 
Harvey GOUCH, rape, acquitted of rape and hung jury 
  on age of consent. 
Adam DAUGERTY, carry concealed arms, not guilty 
On Friday afternoon the court adjourned over to January 19, 1917 


 

FIRST HAPPENINGS IN MORGAN COUNTY


 A FLYING MACHINE    For the first time, perhaps in its history, Wartburg was favored with a visit by an aeroplane Tuesday 
 Morning. The plane landed in Mr. Edd Heidel's.  The gasoline gave out and it had to come to earth. 
     The owner of the machine left Lexington, Ky. early Tuesday morning and passed over Wartburg 
 about 10:45 a.m. It was a great sight for the people of Wartburg and surrounding Country. 
 [Morgan County News dated January 20, 1920] 

FIRST OIL WELL"First Well Brought in Oct. 6 At Sunbright, Another Last Week. " 
   
      "The first well was brought in October 6th 1924 at a depth of 1441 feet.  This 
 well is a fine gas producer and it is estimated to produce according to the test 
 of 6 hours pumping of 42 barrels, at this rate would produce 168 barrels in 24 hours. 
      This well is piped to Huffman Switch, the first siding north of Sunbright 
 for loading.  The pipe line is laid and in the next few days will be in operation. 
 Development is being done by Russell Producing Company." 
      [An excerpt from MORGAN COUNTY PRESS, March 13, 1925] 

*FROM THE MORGAN COUNTY PRESS DATED AUGUST 1926*
   "The Petersen family of Chicago passed thru Wartburg Friday on their way out 
 to visit the Ritters near Annadale." 
    " It will be remembered that Mr. Petersen was the first to bring a car into Morgan 
 County.  It was used out at the Fair at Deer Lodge one year to carry passengers for 
 their first ride.  Charges was 25 cents for about a mile.  Down the road and back. 
 This caused as much excitement at the Fair as any other thing.  Now we have hundreds 
 of them out there and very little excitement that they cause to-day, unless they wreck." 
      [Excerpt from  MORGAN COUNTY PRESS, dated, August 16, 1926] 
  

FIRST DEATH VERDICT IN MORGAN'S HISTORY Paul Rockford, negro inmate of Brushy mountain penitentiary, was convicted this week for the murder of a fellow prisoner by the name of Otis Peters, also a negro.  Rockford was sentenced to death.
The negros had been at outs for some time.  The evidence showed that a near fight ensued over the possession of a pillow the night before the murder and that the defendant, who claimed that he stabbed Peters in self-defense, laid in wait for the murdered negro at the opening of the mines and killed him with a dirk about fourteen inches long, confessed to have been made from a file.  The jury returned a verdict Wednesday morning of murder in the first degree, the penalty being fixed as death in the electric chair.  The defence asked for a new trial, which was over ruled and August 23rd was the date set for the execution.
   This is the first time in the history of Morgan County that a jury has returned a verdict of death.  The defening lawyers were D. W. Byrge, of Oakdale, and S.H. Justice of Wartburg, while the state is represented by States Atty, Jesse L. Rogers and J. M. Davis.
 [Excerpt from Morgan County Press - dated June, 1926]


Oakdale, Tenn., Jan 15.--
 Pictures that talk like living people will be the feature attraction at the
 Lyric Theatre at Oakdale on Saturday, Jan. 26th, one day only, which will
 be shown in connection with the regular silent picture.  The Talking Picture
 -that miracle of the movies, and yesterday only a dream, has been crystallized
 into reality in the new movietone to be shown here.
 The program will consist of six all talking vaudeville acts, on the screen, featuring
 Helen Harrell, for three years with Al Jolsons stage successes; Arthur Nealy,
 the night-in-gale tenor, featured as a soloist and master of ceremonies in the
 Public Houses; Marguerite Brandon, of the famous singing Brandon Vaudeville
 team, chosen by Edison for the nationwide tone test comparisons and Jerry
 Krone, staff night club entertainer at "The Tenth" with his famous guitar in
 an interesting "Bum Song" number.
 The admission is twenty and forty cents.
 (From THE MORGAN COUNTY NEWS, dated, Jan. 17. 1929)

FIRST AIR TRAGEDY IN MORGAN COUNTY 
 The Morgan County News 
 Wartburg, Tennessee, Thursday, December 27, 1934Mail Plane Crashes and Pilot dies in Crash on Peak of Pilot Mountain 
           -------------------- 
 American Airways Mail and Express Ship 
 Crashes on Morgan County Mountainside 
            -------------------- 
 Lost in the Cumberlands, Curley Riggs Hits Lofty Summit and Burns 
           --------------------- 
 Written by Leason Waters 
           --------------------- 
      "Morgan County's first air tragedy was told early Sunday Morning 
 by the rugged mountainside of Pond Knob, on Pilot Mountain, with the 
 finding of the wreckage of the ill fated American Airways Mail and Express 
 No., 12-286 and its pilot Russel (Cirley) Riggs horribly burned and mangled 
 where he had crashed in a dense fog about 3:30 a.m. Saturday Morning. 
      Two Morgan County men, Kermit Freels and Theodore Freels, discovered 
 the wreckage and the body of the pilot on Sunday Morning almost atop the 
 lofty Pond Knob, next in altitude to Big Pilot Mountain, the highest in that 
 section. 
      The Freels brothers and other residents of the section at the foot of the 
 mountains had remembered hearing a plane roaring toward the mountains 
 early Saturday morning and remembered having remarked that "it would 
 have to go higher or he wouldn't get get over that mountain ahead."  Later 
 they heard a noise back in the mountains and saw a fire light, but thought 
 that it was probably a flare the pilot had dropped to determine the height 
 of the mountain under him.  Reading a newspaper report of a mail plane 
 supposedly lost in Tennessee Mountains, the Freels brothers set search in 
 the direction in which the low flying plane went Saturday morning. 
      They discovered the object of their search about eight o'clock Sunday 
 morning. 
      Pilot Riggs had evidently become lost in the Cumberland Mountains and was 
 approximately 150 miles off course, which is a direct line from Louisville 
 to Nashville and was flying in a dense fog. 
     The wings and body of the plane were scattered  in smashed bits along the course 
 of the plane after it hit the tops of the trees.  The cargo of damaged mail included, 
 Christmas gifts of watches, jewelry, greeting cards, money and other valuables. 
 Very little was written in the pilot's log. It indicated the mail had left Cleveland 
 at 12:46, Columbus, 1:50, Cincinnati, 1:50, Louisville, 2:40.  Riggs was last heard 
 from shortly after he left Louisville airport, 2:52 a.m.  Also stated, after leaving 
 Louisville, "landing gear in bad condition, wheels shimmies on concrete." 
      Sheriff Byrge and his deputies held vigil over the corpse and guraded the mail 
 until officials arrived late Sunday night.  Coroner M. M. Goad of Warrtburg 
 held inquest over the body.  Otto Schubert, Wartburg Funeral director took charge of the 
 body and after preparing it, drove to Nashville from where it was shipped to Texas. " 
     [An Excerpt from Morgan County News, Dec. 27, 1934] 

DISTINGUISHED TRIO VISITS WARTBURGMcAlister, McKellar and Bachman Greeted by Large Crowd
     "For the first time in political history 
 a Govenor and two United States Senators visited 
 Wartburg and they were greeted by an enthusiastic 
 and responsive crowd.  Arriving in Wartbirg at 1:39 p.m. 
 last Wednesday over 900 people crowded the court yard 
 and street to greet the visitors who were accompanied 
 bya number of friends.  Among which were Burgin Dossett, 
 Campaign Manager for Pope and now Assistant campaign 
 manager for McAlister, Harold Wimberly, Judge Bob 
 Williams, Alex Shell, Dave Quinn, R.B. Cassell, Chas 
 Donagy and many others. 
 They were accompanied to Scott Co. by C. W. Wright 
 and Carlisle Coe of Oneida.  The Govenor and Senators 
 were delighted at the reception given them in Morgan 
 County."   {An excerpt Morgan County News, Nov. 1, 1934}   

FIRST APPLICATION FOR OLD AGE ASSISTANCE RECEIVED THIS WEEK 
     Applications for Old Age Assistance, Aid to the Blind and Aid to Dependent Children are 
 being taken now at the Wartburg Office of the Department of Institutions and Public Welfare, 
 from those people that are on the relief rolls. The first application was taken Monday. 
      Those desiring to make application that are not on the relief rolls will be allowed to do 
 so after August 1st.  Anyone not able to come to the office is advised to notify the office 
 and a worker will call at the home. 
 Monday and Friday of each week have been set as days to take applications at the office. 
      [Excerpt from Morgan County News dated July 1, 1937] 

MARION M. JUSTICE

Marion M. Justice lived to be 101.
He was born June 26, 1850 and died April 11, 1951.
He was married to Telithia Caroline Brummitt on Nov. 20, 1871.
His parents were Squire Justice and Serah Russell.  Marion and Caroline are buried in the Estes Cemetery  in Coalfield.

————–

Obituary for M.M. Justice

M.M. Justice of Coalfield died April 11,, 1951 at the age of 100 years, nine months and fifteen days. He was probably the oldest man in East Tennessee.  He was the son of Esquire Justice and Sally Russell Justice. He was married to Telethia Caroline Brummitt in the year 1871 and was the father of the following children: Mrs. Florence Cheek of Harriman, Mrs. Serelda Sisson of Oliver Springs, Judge J.H. Justice of Wartburg; Mrs. Arpie Jackson of Coalfield and three children who died in infancy.Mr. Justice joined the Pleasant Grove Baptist Church in early life. He was a great admirer of Abraham Lincoln and went to the election with his father when Lincoln ran doe president. He worked on the public roads of Morgan County from the time he was 18 years of age until he was 50 years old, this being a legal requirement at that time. Mr. Justice was strictly sober and had a supreme hatred for strong drinks.  He was loyal to his family and friends and especially to his God.  He believed in law and order and stood strictly by his convictions until the day of his departure. He probably had more knowledge of the early history of Morgan and Anderson Counties than any man living in recent years.  He could readily tell you the boundaries of the original tracts of land in this county.  Mr. Justice was a pioneer of the old school and was always ready to give admonition and advice to the rising generation, especially if he thought they were taking the wrong course. He was known for his knowledge of the Bible and made it a life-long study. He was a great believer in honesty and truthfulness and tried in every way and truthfulness and tried in every way possible to impress upon his family and friends the great worth of practicing such virtues. Mr Justice spent his entire life in Morgan County.Funeral services were held at the Pleasant Grove Baptist Church on April 13th at 11:00 A.M. with Rev. David McGlothin and Rev. Williams officiating and was laid to rest in the Estes Cemetery. Sharp’s of Oliver Springs in charge.  [Morgan County News, 4-19-1951]

-Obituary for Telitha Caroline Brummitt Justice

Mrs. Justice was born May 18, 1846, in Anderson County, Tennessee near the little station known as Marlow, in that county; her maiden name was Telitha Caroline Brummitt.  Her father’s names was James Brummitt and her mother’s name was Serelda Brown Brummitt.
Mrs. Justice leaves to mourn her loss her husband, M.M. Justice, who is in his 79th  year, and the following children:  Mrs. Florence Cheek of  Coal Hill, Mrs. R.A. Sisson of Oliver Springs, Mrs. Arpie Jackson of Coalfield, Judge S.H. Justice of Wartburg, and Horace Justice of Coalfield and three infant children who died in early life, making eight children born to this union.  She is also survived by sixteen grand-children and twenty great-grandchildren, and one brother, the Rev. W.R. Brummitt of Oliver Springs; and one sister, Mrs. Mary A. Freybarger, living at Hamilton, Ohio.  Mrs. Justice was 13 years of age when the war between the North and the South was declared, and many times during her life, while in a reminiscent mood, she would tell of the many struggles and trials that she had undergone during that war.  In Feb. 1862, her father was shot and killed through a crack in the door during the early part of the night, after a hard days work clearing a new ground, while he had one of his younger children in his arms.  At the report of the gun the father of Mrs. Justice dropped the child from his arms and fell with his hands in the fire.  There being no one in the house at this time, except the father of Mrs. Justice, her mother, who was very ill and confined to her bed; the little child and Mrs. Justice, who was then only 13 years of age.  After the fatal shot had been fired, Mrs. Justice locked her arms under the arms of her dead father, pulling him out of the fire and straightening out his lifeless body on the floor.  At this time the mother of Mrs. Justice thought in all probability that their house was surrounded by enemies, so she ordered that the light be extinguished and the fire covered up until an investigation could be made and the neighbors notified.  In this condition, Mrs. Justice with her sick mother in bed kept a vigilant watch through the night while her father lay a lifeless corps on the floor before them.
During the year 1862, while the war between the states was still raging, Mrs. Justice’s older brother Wiley Brummitt, had enlisted in the Union Army and was stationed at Fishing Creek, Ky., and while there got a permit or furlough to visit his wife, mother and sisters in Anderson County, Tenn.  He came home and stayed a few days and while returning back to his regiment across the mountain and down New River, he was encountered by a bunch of guerillas, whose purpose was to loot, steal and kill and the ran Mr. Brummitt into the river and shot him in the face; then it was that Mrs. Justice, though a girl in her early teens, was again called to a trying ordeal.  She walked from Anderson County by way of Blowing Springs, where Windrock mines are now situated, but arrived after her brother had been buried in the old White Grave Yard in the 10th district of Anderson County on New River.  She met her duties boldly, and got her brother’s haver sack, as she always called it, his shot pouch and army rifle, after which she wended her way back across the mountain to her old home near Marlow.
She had a brother names Gilbert Brummitt, who died at Somerset, Ky., while serving in the Union Army.  She had another brother names Moses Brummitt, who also was a soldier in the Union Army, who was captured by the Confederate soldiers and imprisoned on Belle Isle, who died there during that great struggle.  W.R. Brummitt who is now living at Oliver Springs, served in the Union Army, 3 years, 7 months and 17 days, and was honorable discharged.  He is now in this 85th year.  Mrs. Justice had a sister by the name of Martha Brummitt, who married one Daniel Jones of Morgan County; this sister died in Roane County many years ago.  She had two younger brothers, namely, James and Rufus, who were not old enough to enlist in the army, both have been dead several years.
Mrs. Justice was a member of the Baptist Church for near 60 years; she was a strong believer in the Baptist faith, but first of all she believed in God.  She loved her family and her friends and was ever ready to speak a good word to those in trouble.  She was married to M.M. Justice, Nov. 26, 1871 by Squire Thos. Davis, who was one of the old pioneers of this county.
Mrs. Justice used to tell of the many hardships and privations that she and the other members of her family were subjected to during the Civil War, and on one occasion, she told of her mother owning a find young mare, and while the Confederate soldiers were passing through the country, she bridled and led this young mare away from the main road out into the forest and kept her there all night for fear she would be taken away from them.  She said that this young mare could hear the other horses passing the road and would attempt to squeal or nicker to them, as she called it, and at each time she would take her bonnet and wrap it around the mare’s mouth and nostrils to keep the soldiers who were passing the road from hearing the squeal of the animal.
Mrs Justice had many friends and no enemies in so far as we know, and will be long remembered and never forgotten.[Morgan County News, December 13, 1928]