Bettie Jane Cook Gouge, wife of  William Henry Gouge of Coalfield,  Tenn. with her triplet sons in 1903.  Only one lived to adulthood, Hugh Jinks Gouge.


William Henry Gouge and wife Bettie Jane, with son -in-law, Ezra McGlothin, Bessie Gouge McGlothin,Ollie Gouge Sampsel, Saddie Gouge Dill Hall, James Oliver, Robert Elmer, Lewis Arnold, Hugh Jinks. Missing from picture,  two of the triplets, Viola Gouge Smith, Harvey Cleveland Gouge and William Henry Gouge Jr.


 This is the obituary of my great-grand mother Bettie Jane Cook Gouge. She lived and died in Coalfield, Tennessee and has many decendants in Morgan Co. whom I think will enjoy reading this. It was found packed away in her sister ( Julia Mann’s ) personal things after her sister died. Julia’s grand-daughter gave it to me.

      The funeral of Mrs.Bettie Jane Cook Gouge, who died at her home in Oliver Springs, Sunday, Feb. 7, 1932 at 5p.m. was held Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock at the Middle Creek Church, with Rev. Walls of that place and Rev.J.B. Tallant of Harriman, officiating.
Mrs. Gouge was born July 27, 1870 and was married to W.H. Gouge in 1888. To this union twelve children were born, 3 of whom await her coming in the Great Beyond.  Mrs.Gouge professed faith in Christ at the age of 13. She was a loving mother, a true wife and a kind friend. To know her was to love her. She is
survived by husband W.H. Gouge, six sons, Hugh, James, Elmer, and Lewis of Oliver Springs, Harvey of Kentucky;  3 daughters, Mrs.Saddie Dills of Jefferson City, Mrs. Viola Smith of California and Mrs. Bessie McGlothin of Knoxville;  3 brothers, L.O. Cook of Chattanooga, Grover Cook of Johnson City and Frank Cook of Harriman, and one sister, Mrs. Julia Mann also of Harriman: 22 grandchildren and one great grand-child. Interment was at the Oliver Springs cemetery.


Courtesy of Susan Gouge Daughtery

H. McGLOTHIN & CHILDREN Front Row, June, Harvey (seated) and Madge. Back Row: Ruth, Glen, Marie MAY SEXTON McGLOTHIN – ca 1927 McGLOTHIN, MAY, 94, of Coalfield died Dec. 13, 2002 burial: Anderson Memorial Gardens  ==   Harvey (Robert Harvey)McGlothin,             HARVEY McGLOTHIN daughter, Marie and son Glen MAY & MARIE McGLOTHIN

Harvey McGlothin          Marie McGlothin           Maude McGlothin.                                                                                              McGlothin, MaudHinds                                                                                      1-22-1886, 9-19-1923, Married to                                                                         R.H. 9-9-1906 Burial: Davis                                                                                 Cemetery, Coalfield

Maude died of complications from                                                                       arthritis at a very young age



Children of Robert Harvey and Maude McGlothin. Ruth (left), Marie (upper right) and Glen (lower right) McGlothin


   Obituary of Mae McGlothin: 
McGLOTHIN, MAY, 94, of Coalfield, died Friday, Dec. 13, 2002, at her home. According to her family, Mrs. McGlothin was Morgan County’s first kindergarten teacher and taught school in Scott and Morgan counties for 37 years. In 1973, she was honored as Tennessee State Teacher of the Year. Since 1931, she had been an active member of Middle Creek Baptist Church and had served the church as a Sunday school teacher, children’s church director, Women’s Missionary Union director, Vacation Bible School director and pianist. Born Dec. 27, 1907, in Huntsville, she was the daughter of John and Ida Potter Sexton of Huntsville, both now deceased. She was the widow of Robert Harvey McGlothin. Mrs. McGlothin enjoyed traveling, bird-watching, photography, quilting and crocheting. She traveled to all 50 states and many foreign countries, including the Holy Land, Japan, Australia, China and England. Her family described her as a devoted wife, mother, teacher and caregiver whose philosophy of teaching was that “Jesus is the most perfect teacher of all” and who spent many hours cutting and stitching to make quilts and blankets for friends and family. Mrs. McGlothin is survived by her daughters, Ruth Hamby and her husband, Fred, of Coalfield, and Madge Jones and her husband, Bob, of Oliver Springs; son-in-law, Jesse Kesterson of Coalfield; daughter-in-law, Ivadell McGlothin of Coalfield; grandchildren, Johnny Tanner of Madison, Billy Tanner of Maryville, Mike Jones of Oliver Springs, Kenny Jones of Clinton, Jerry Kesterson of Coalfield, Jeff Kesterson of Marietta, Ga., Jean Tanner of Lenoir City, Millie Skiles, Ann Lindsay, Karen Teague, Peggy Jones, Judy Solis, Jenny Wendt and Janet Isbell, all of Coalfield, Rita Brown of Oceanside, Calif., Sherry Poe of Buford, Ga., and Rebecca Brooks of Oak Ridge; and numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren; sisters, Hazel Yancey and Grace Long, both of Oliver Springs; and sister-in-law, Grace Sexton of Jellico. In addition to her parents and her husband, she was preceded in death by a brother, William Sexton of Jellico; another sister, Ruth West of Huntsville; a son, Glen McGlothin of Coalfield; two other daughters; Marie Tanner of Maryville and June Kesterson of Coalfield; and another grandson, Jimmy McGlothin of Coalfield. The funeral was held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15, in the chapel at Sharp Funeral Home in Oliver Springs. Burial followed at Anderson Memorial Gardens in Clinton. The family requests that any memorials be in the form of donations to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering at Middle Creek Baptist Church, 6455 Knoxville Highway, Oliver Springs, TN 37840.  [The Oak Ridger]

Courtesy of Judy Solis 


January, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Williams are the proud parents of a fine baby girl which came to their home Sunday morning week

Ross Williams came in Sunday Morning from Island Ford for a couple days rest.

W. M. Shannon and Miss Lilie Duncan were married Wednesday afternoon at the residence of John A. Jones.

February, 1917

Mr. & Mrs. Earl Phillips were blessed with a nice baby girl for their Christmas Present.

John Holland blew into town a few days since, enroute to his headquarters at Banner Springs.

Dr. T. W. Nash married Conrad Nelson and Bessie Human Saturday at Sunbright. May all your troubles be little ones, Conrad!

Mr. & Mrs. Thorwald Strand started on an overland trip to Harriman Monday, but became stuck in the mud beyond Liberty Church and returned home sadder, but a good deal wiser.

Wartburg experienced four of the coldest days in the history of the oldest inhabitant. It culminated Sunday in a regular North Dakota blizzard and snowstorm.

One of the most destructive fires which has visited Sunbright for many years, occured last Friday evening.
The fire is supposed to have been caused by a defective flue.  The hotel was valued at some six thousand
dollars and was insured for $3,500.  The furniture loss was about $4,000, on which there was $2,000
insurance we were informed.  The second building burned was owned by Russ Freels and
was occupied by Mr. Saufley. The loss was complete as there was no insurance.

Mrs. John Estes, wife of Richard Estes, died at home in Coalfield on Monday morning of last week.

Many of the friends of Mrs. Geo Babcock, of Burrville,  met at her home with well filled
baskets and gave her a birthday surprise on February 10th.

Send us the price of a year’s subscription.  We need the money.

March, 1917 
We extend to Mr. & Mrs. F. M. Brown, our sympathy in the death of their son, Harry.
We knew him as one of the natures noble young men.

Mr. Ben Jacks returned home Friday from Ludlow, Ky.

Measles and whooping cough is raging through our town.

The Misses Phenice and Eva Galloway gave a Valentine Party at their home on Feb. 14.
All present enjoyed the evening to the limit.  At a late hour refreshments were served.

Charles Davis and family of Roane County have moved to Coalfield and
occupy the Davis property on the creek.

Look to your potatoes and see if they are frozen.
Mr. Roy C. Craven of Kingsport, and Miss Edna Pearl Morris of Wartburg,
were united in marriage Wednesday afternoon of last week, February 7th.
The ceremony was preformed in the parlors of the Hotel Bristol.  The
ceremony was performed by Rev. Adolphus Kistler.
Mrs. Craven was the youngest daughter of Mr. & Mrs. T. A. Morris
and was one of the most popular young ladies of Wartburg’s younger set
The Press adds  congratulations.
John Wilson of Stephens and Miss Mamie Jarnagin of Coalfield,
were married Sunday February 4th.

April, 1917 

Walter Adkisson has embroidered the western edge of his place with a multiform fence.

The new telephone line is stretching its slow and weary length from Oliver Springs to Coalfield.

Bruno Schubert has for sale one 2 h pr Waterloo Gasoline Engine,
second hand, will be sold cheap.  Price, $25.
Mr. & Mrs. John L. Scott, who have been living near Indianapolis, Ind.,
returned last week and are in Wartburg visiting friends and relatives.
Rev. J. S. Clark celebrated his seventy-sixth birthday, March 25 at his home in Lancing.
On Monday evening, Olive, the eleven year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. I .J. Human,
was given a party in honor of her birthday.
Whose duty is it to see that the Court House yard is cleaned up?  It is high time something was done to it.
Get together everybody  and have a town clean up week before court convenes on April 9.

The young men are taking refuge from patriotism by marrying, as they understand that
single men will hustled to the front first.  So, on last Sunday, a number of weddings
were reported.  Coalfield comes forward with two:
Frank Fink and Blaine Coker:
and, William Bryant and Alice Langley.
Also Oliver Campbell of Oliver Springs, and Ethel Brummitt of Coalfield

Marriage Licenses Issued for the Month of April, 1917

Charles Pearson to Sebba Pearson
David Smith to Rachael Cooper
William Bryant to Alice Langley
Rudolph Ruppee to Bertie O. Presswood
Herwan Frogge to Myrtle Smith
Ruben E. West to Myrtle Jones

William Ford to Nessie Llels? or Liels?
Earl Rayder to Icy V. Keathley
Virgil H. Neeley to Hattie Lewallen
Will Adkins to Anna Bransteter
Thomas Jordan to Ethel Hawn

May, 1917 

Andy Langford’s new mill has followed the State of Tennessee and gone ‘bone dry,”
necessitating the closing down of the mill and  giving his men an opportunity of making something to eat.

Col. John Moser of Jefferson City, with the aid of M. M. Goad, has picked up a car of cattle and hogs.

Mr. Pearl Huiskins and Ms. Ethel Simpson of Oakdale were married Sunday Evening at the home of W. Z. Strickland.

Lottie Wilson and H. M. Taylor were united in the Holy Bonds of Wedlock by the Rev. I. C. Whaley
at the home of Mr. & Mrs. Verdie Jones.

The Marriage of Virgil Neeley and Hallie Lewallen was quietly soleminzed on April 26, by Esq. J. D. Young at the home of the bride’s parents. The bride is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Lewallen. The groom is the son of B. J. Neeley of Glen Mary.
IMPORTANT MASS MEETING   There will be a Mass Meeting and Food Preparedness Conference on SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1917 at the Court House, Wartburg at l:00 p.m. Every farmer, business man and citizen is iinvited to be present Come and bring your neighbors.
Will be open for the accomodation of patients and guests.

Director – Dr. C. C. Quale of Chicago

June, 1917 

Miss Ethel Robbins of Oakdale is visiting her sister, Mr. N. D. Byrd.

There will be an Ice Cream Supper Saturday Evening on the Masonic Lawn for the benefit of Mr. Decatur Davis.
Mr. Davis is not able to work and he has 4 or 5 children.

The whooping cough is raging in this section.

Little Annie Mike & Johnny Szymbroski, while out cattle hunting last week, got lost in the woods, being out all night and finding their way to Lancing where word was sent to their parents.


July,  1917 

Little Lester England, son of Mrs. Bessie England, is very sick at present.  It is feared he has typhoid.
Born to Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Kennedy of Burrville, on the 17th, a big boy.

James Scott is low with typhoid fever.

Rev. T. V. Peters and Prof A. Peters were called to Knoxville to the bedside of their mother, Mrs. M. J. Peters who was very sick.

Oscar Stonecipher and Miss Nora Wilson were united in marriage, Saturday afternoon about 2:00 o’clock.
Esquire Joyner performed the ceremony.

Married July 22, Mr. Carson and Miss Artie Fairchild.  We wish the young couple much happiness.
Marriage Licenses Issued during the month of July, 1917
John R. Neathery to Sephia O. Cooper
Oscar Stonecipher to Nora Wilson
William H. Walker and Delia Buel
Loda Loyd to Gertrude H. Hamby
Charles White to Zollie Cook
Wesley Dowlan to Carrie McAllister
Carson Brown to Artie Fairchilds
A. J. Lankford to Clara Dixon
Herbert Fairchilds to Pearl Freels
Oron Huntger and Edith Hyde
John Bradshaw to Sarah Bray
Alex Walls to Mamie McGlothin
J.G. Mines to Elizabeth Johnson
Edward Young to Josie Freels

August 1917 

The typhoid patients, Mr. Peter Donohue and Masters  Ira Brown , Lester England and Ben Cooper are all improving nicely under the treatment of Dr. Jones.

Mrs. F. A. Bacher of Chatt., who together with her husband and children,
are spending the summerwith Mr. Bates near Annadale.

Russell Freels will begin work on his new dwelling  just across the street from the Johnston Store in a few days.

A pie supper was given at the school house near Union Church last Saturday night. Sheriff Byrd was the fortunate winner of a nice cake for being the ugliest man present. The boys all bid like they had just had a pay day.  We wish to compliment the young ladies on being such good cooks.   $51.00 was raised.

Joe Summer, a nephew of our Circuit Court Clerk, Charles W. Summer, went to Harriman a few days since and joined Co. C., 2nd Tenn and is now enjoying a soldiers life.

Born to Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Kennedy of Burrville on the 17th, a big boy.

Mr. Walter Patching of Oakdale spent a few hours with his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Gee Patching Sunday.

Born to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Knight on August 1st, an heir.

Born to Mr. & Mrs. J. R. Wilson, the seventh boy.

Torvale Strand is wearing a size larger hat occasioned by the arrival  of a son and heir Tuesday Morning.

Florence Gunter of Lancing is sick with fever.

Wesley Greer is sick with typhoid.

103 men were called for service by Morgan County Local Board on Aug., 27, 28, and 29.

Mr. A. J. Cromwell of Port Arthur Texas has been in Morgan County for 3 or 4 weeks. He has been in Texas for six or seven years.

September 1917

Born to Rev. and Mrs. S. E. Taylor on Sept. 20th, a fine boy.

Born to Mr. & Mrs. J. H. England on Sept. 17, a fine boy.

Born to Mr. & Mrs. Hugh K. Jones, another Democrat, born Sept. 16th.

The whooping cough scrouge of this community has subsided.

Lincoln Adams of  Deer Lodge celebrated his being drafted into the Army by stealing away and marrying Miss Perkins of Knoxville.  A charming young lady, who is the daughter of Frank Perkins.

Esq. H. H. Pittman and Mrs. Betty England were married last Saturday night. Judge Wm. Bullard officiating.

Robert Morgan and Miss Icy Patterson were married at the home of William Potter on Flat Fork Saturday evening by Esq. P. W. Holder.

The home of Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Ferguson was the scene of a wedding on September 6th. Friends and relatives assembled in the parlor when Mrs. Fergusons brother, Mr. Harvey Bullard, entered from the sitting room with Miss Ruth Goldston on his arm. Mr. Bullard is the son of Judge Wm. Bullard of Sunbright.  The bride is the daughter
of Mrs. L. Goldston of near Oakdale.


I will, on October 4, 1917, in front of the J. J. Johnson Store at Oakdale, at one O’Clock, offer for sale and to the highest bidder, for sale and to the highest bidder, for cash in hand, one pair of Mules and Harness wagon and chain, known as the BOLES MULES. Nice clean trim mules in good shape Come and see them.

Jno H. Bingham

Jack Frost done considerable nipping last week.

Carl Schubert’s present address is
Carl Schubert, Co K,
103 Machine Gun Battalion,
Camp Sevier,  Greenville, S. C.

Edward F. Garrett, Lincoln Adams, Lindsay Hall, all of  Deer Lodge, have joined the Colors. Deer Lodge feels assured they will carry the flag with honor.

Henry McClure and wife of Knoxville, formerly of Coalfield, came out Saturday and sold their home to Albert Ruffner.

Martin Galloway and Adra Howard were married at Deer Lodge Sunday afternoon by Dr. Nash.

Mr. F. Stezewski and Mrs. Falda were married last week.  Mr. Stezewski has
three children by his former wife who died some two months ago.

Mr. Dwight Davis and Miss Jennie Morris were quietly married at the home of the bride’s parents, on October 14.

Mrs. Ben Scott and Peter Strand of Deer Lodge were united in marriage Saturday.  Dr. Nash officiating.


 Community Fair

Saturday, October 27, 1917 – Burrville, Tenn. – Be sure and attend it!

November, 1917

Douglas Needham, Charlie Bales, Chas. Hurst and Culman Ennis, have all joined the Morgan County Colony already at Flint, Michigan  where big wages are said to prevail.

Mrs. Chess Laymance is still very ill.

There are about fifteen new wells going down in the Glenmary Field.

Sam Davis, who had the grading around three sides of the court house, finished last Saturday.

T. C. Cooper and Gran Davis favored Wartburg with a visit one day last week.

The girls of our school are going to make paper candles for the soldiers to use in the trenches.

Last Friday afternoon the farm residence of Wm. Stutten, about a mile southeast of town was totally destroyed by fire with nearly all household effects.

December 1917
Charles Olmstead went over to Crossville and sold his fine team of Mules for the U. S. Army purposes for 450.

Wartburg in the past week has experienced a taste of genuine Dakota weather.

Miss Doreen Sargeant of Deer Lodge has gone to Chattanooga to take a course in stenography at the business college.

The party who took the parcel from the smoker on Train No. 6 is known and will save trouble by returning it.

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Takac have purchased the Summit Park Hotel property through agency of Kimbell Land Co.This passes he last holdings of Capt.  J. W. Miller, who settled the place some 30 odd years ago.

Mr. Henry J. Kreis, while trying to catch his mule Wednesday, had the misfortune of having a rib broken by being kicked by his mule.

Ruben A. Davis, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Davis and Ernest R. Williams,son of Mr. and Mrs. John B. Williams,
have passed a most creditable examination and have been ordered to Camp Taylor near Louisville, Ky.

Born to Mr. & Mrs. T. Crouch on Nov. 15th, a fine big boy.

William Cromwell of U. S. Training camp; at Chickamauga Park, spent a few days with his father, Chas. Cromwell at Burrville.

Miss Mattie Jones and Ernest Freytag were wed at the home of L. E. Davis. The ceremony was preformed by Squire Langley.

William Stonecipher and Amy Wilson were united in wedlock by Rec. D. H. Taylor.

Lost on train No. 6, Oct. 28, a dark green broadcloth skirt wrapped in newspaper. Finder return to “Alley and Hedrick’s  Store in Deermont and receive reward.

Six men were drafted and ordered to report at Wartburg on Sept. 4th, not later than 4 p.m..  They will leave for Camp at Atlanta on Sept. 5th.
They are:
Headerson F. Byrd,
Ramsey Daughtery,
Leonard Lyons,
Dock A. England,
William A. Gillis
John A. Voils.

September 7, 1917
Lincoln Adams of Deer Lodge, celebrated his being drafted into the Army by stealing away and marrying Miss Perkins of Knoxville, a charming young lady who is the daughter of Frank Perkins.

Week of December 14, 1917

On Saturday the following boys left Morgan County for Camp Gordon to do their duty as Uncle Sam’s soldiers:

G. A. Ruppee
J. Davis
J. W. Jacks
E. Rogers
E. J. McKeethan
Henry Kreis
Blair Akins
O. Basler
V. Neeley
M. C. Brown
H. S. Freels
S. Larcy

T. A. Morris
I.J Human
John A. Jomnes
W. Z. Stricklin
H. W. Summer
L. Risen
D. W. Byrge
W. Y. Boswell
N. L. Duncan
J. L. Cox
H. P Alley
W. A. Langley
S. B. BertramR. Jones
Wm. Bullard


Burn Cecil, a veteran of the Spanish-American war is deeply interested in organizing  a Co.  to repulse the Germanic forces, and will sacrifice his money, his time, and his life in this patriotic cause if necessary.  He says this county is facing one of the most gigantic crisis it has faced since the Civil War and if our young manhood don’t rally to the flag, and stand like a  ‘Stonewall Jackson’, our country will go down in defeat and our flag will trail in the dust.  (Week of December 14, 1917)


The December term of the Criminal and Law Court Convened Monday morning with Judge Hick on the Branch.  Attorney General, W. H. Buttram was in attendance.  Chas W. Summer, Circuit Court Clerk was at his desk and had all matters of his office ready for the court.  The following gentlemen were call as Grand and Trial Juries.


W. H. McCartt, Foreman
J. L. Hackworth
W. R. Nelson
Chas Powell
P. R. Estes
W. W. Fairchild
Joe Holloway
Thos. Brewster
J. A.Fagan
W. W. Duncan
John W. Owen
Ben Brooks
Lee McGlothin
James B. Duncan, Officer


Charley Moore
Alf Collins
Ernest Heidle
Clenice Hamby
Millard Albertson
Walter Powell
Mart Stewart
R. T. Estes
J. K. Duncan
J. E. McGuffey
W. W. Peters
S. S. Powell
John L. Scott, Officer
The State vs Albert McCartt. nollied on cost
The State vs R. H. McGill, nollie on cost.
The State vs Harvey Jestes, submission fine fifty dollars and cost
The State vs J. D. Pemberton et al continued
The State vs Ed Duncan, guilty.

Frank Schubert has just opened up his general store on “B” Street, and is selling his goods cheaper that the cheapest, and is still crying out with a loud voice for more customers.


Wm. S. Adsmond died at his home on Spring Street,  Deer Lodge, on Feb 18, 1917. He was born March 26, 1834 in Norway and came to this country in 1813.  He enlisted in the first Illinois regiment and served three years and seven months and fought in many noted battles. After the war he married to Miss Mary C. Katterson.  By this union eight children were born, six of whom and the mother survive him to mourn his loss.  In 1892 he came to Tennessee where he has resided until his death.  Mr. Adsmond died in full triumph of the faith.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. T. W. Nash at the M. C. Church and the remains laid to rest in Mount Hope Cemetery.
(Morgan County Press dated March 1, 1917)

 ARMES, ALFORD   Alford Armes, an old and experienced miner, got killed in the Fodderstack Coal mines at this place last Saturday about 11 o’clock Nov. 24, 1917 by falling slate.  His remains was taken to New River for interment Sunday.  He leaves a wife and many children of tender age to mourn his loss. (Morgan County Press dated Dec. 14, 1917)

BALLINGER,  DR. JOHN, Dr. John Ballinger died on the 20th and was buried on the 21st.  Rev. W. L. Davis conducted the funeral services.  Interment was in M. C. Church Cemetery by the side of his Mother.  (Morgan County Press dated July 7, 1917)

BOWMER, WILLIAM , William Bowmer of Deer Lodge, a lifelong and esteemed resident of Morgan County, died at that place on Friday, July 27, in the 69th year of his age.  He leaves one daughter, Mrs. G. U. Howard of Wartburg, and four sons, Baalam and John Bowmer of Va., and Buster and D. Bowmer of Deer Lodge and may relatives and friends to mourn his loss.  His remains were placed to rest in Deer Lodge Cemetery,  Dr. Nash conducting the funeral services.   (Morgan County Press dated  August 3, 1917.)

BREEDLOVE,  RUFUS Rufus Breedlove, who has been sick with rheumatism for several years died Tuesday evening and will be buried today at Liberty Church. (Morgan County Press dated March 1, 1917)

BROWN, F. M. We extend to Mr. & Mrs. F. M. Brown our sympathy in the death of their son Harry. (Morgan County Press dated March 1, 1917) 

CLARK INFANT, The infant daughter of Rev. & Mrs. S. B. Clark died at their home in Athens, November 3, 1917.  Rev. Clark arrived Sunday evening for burial in Burrville Cemetery.  (Morgan County Press dated November 16, 1917)

CHRISTMAS, W.W.  Mrs. J. D. Young was at Harriman last week attending the funeral of her father, Mr. W. W. Christmas. (Morgan County Press dated December 21, 1917)

 DELIUS,  MARGARET T., Margaret T. Delius, widow of the late Charles H. Delius, long a noted and respected citizen of Morgan County, died at the home of her son, R. D. Delius near Knoxville, July 28, 1971.  Her remains were brought here by her two sons, R. D. and H. M. Delius, and were buried in the the German Cemetery by the side of her beloved deceased husband.  The Delius family are well known by most everybody here, having lived here many years. Mrs. Delius was about 81 years old.  (Morgan County Press dated Aug. 3, 1917)

DORSCHEID, MRS. M, .  Mrs. M. Dorscheid passed away Monday morning after an illness of several weeks.  She was a lady of estimable qualities and her  death was a shock to her many friends who will mourn her loss.  She leaves her husband, one son, Dr. E. Dorscheid of Oakdale and two daughters, Mrs. Hausen of Deer Lodge and Mrs. Bogart of Iowa to mourn her loss.  She was laid to rest in Mt. Hope Cemetery, Rev. Demetrio officiating. (Morgan County Press, dated March 1, 1917)

GALLOWAY, MAR,  Mrs. Mary Galloway died at the home of her son, Sam H. Galloway, November 22, 1917, at the age of 90.  She leaves five sons and two daughters to mourn her loss.  (Morgan County Press dated December 7, 1917)

JOHNSON, ERNEST R.  Ernest R. Johnson, who was on the battleship Rhode Island, son of Mr. J. T. Johnson and the late Mrs. Johnson of Burrville, was drowned Monday Morning, July 2, 1917 at Yorktown, Va.  His body was recovered Monday, July 9, but on account of it being in the water so long could not be properly embalmed for shipment.  Interment was made in the National Cemetery at Portsmouth, Va, with full Military honors.  Mr. Johnson was 22 years old and unmarried.  He had served three years and six months in the U. S. Navy.  He attained the greatest honor that can be said of any man when his captain said in the letter to his father, ” Your son died doing his duty in time of war, on picket duty protecting the fleet.” He is survived by his father, J. T. Johnson of Burrville, two sisters, Mr. B. H. Storie of Chatt,  Miss Lillie Johnson and one brother, Bennett Johnson, both of Burrville.  (Morgan County Press dated July 20, 1917)

JOYNER INFANT  The 3 year old child of Charles Joyner died last Tuesday and was buried at Liberty.  (Morgan County Press dated October 26, 1917)

LANGLEY, JAMES,  James Langley aged 75 years, a prominent citizen and ex-federal soldier, died at his home in Petros on July 28, 1917.  Mr Langley was born in Virginia, but had lived most of his life in Morgan County and belonged to one of the pioneer families of this county.  He was a member of the Masonic Order and his remains were laid to rest in Mt. Zion Cemetery by Emerald  Lodge No 377 F & A M of which he was a member.  He leaves a widow and six children to mourn his loss.  (Morgan County Press dated Aug. 3, 1917)

MILLER, JAKE, Jake Miller, who lives just across the mountain from Petros on the head waters of New River, died suddenly Saturday nigh, Nov. 24, 1917, with a deadly stroke of paralysis.  His burrial will take place at Shiloahm, on New River  Monday.  (Morgan County Press dated Dec. 12, 1917)

PETERS,  REV. ADAM CLARK, Rev. Adam Clark Peters, commonly called Clark Peters, whose death at Burrville May 31, 1917, has already been announced, ws a preacher in the M. E. Church during most of his life.  He was a circuit rider.  His first work after joining  the conference in 1879 was on the Crossville Circuit which included a large territory round and about.  The first year there were 110 conversions on his work and he received $110 compensation.  It was thru his efforst that a splendid church building was erected at Burrville several years ago and the large building of the A. B. Wright Institute at Burrville stands as a monument of his energy and industry in traveling and scuring contributations to assist in the erection of the same.  (An excerpt-Morgan County Press dated June 21, 1917.

PETERS, MRS. M. J. Mrs. M. J. Peters died at her home near Burrville, August 13, 1917.  She leaves two daughters and six sons to mourn her loss.  Her remains were laid to rest in Burrville Cemetery. Prof. W. A. Peters of Lousiana arrived here Tuesday, too late to attend the funeral of his mother., Mr. M. J. Peters. (Morgan County Press dated August 31, 1917)

QUINN, C. A. , There was a large attendance at the funeral of C. A. Quinn at Lancing Wednesday.   (Morgan County Press dated Feb. 2, 1917)


RUFFNER Child, The 10 year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Harvey Ruffner of Rockbridge died Saturday night after an illness of only 2 or 3 days. (Morgan County Press dated April 20, 1917)

SCOTT,  B. J.,  Deer Lodge lost an old settler in the person of  B. J. SCOTT, who died very suddenly of heart failure, Sunday morning near Catoosa where he had been employed for over a year as blacksmith.  He was the son of C. C. Scott and was born and raised near Deer Lodge, as were his parents before him.  His Grandfather being Julian Scott, one of the earliest residents of Morgan County.  Mr. Scott was 56 years old and one of the Charter Members of IOOF Lodge in Deer Lodge.  He was laid to rest under the auspicies of the Order Monday afternoon from the Methodist Church.  He leaves besides a wife and five children, a number of brothers and sisters to mourn his untimely end. (Morgan County Press dated September 7, 1917)

SCOTT, W. R. , W. R. Scott, 45, son of Z. T. Scott was fatally injured April 13, 1917 by falling from a building.  The deceased was buried at the old HALL grave yard on White Oak.  Funeral services was held by Rev. John Webb assisted by Revs. W. L. Davis and H. McCartt.  (Morgan County Press dated April 26, 1917) 


STEWART,  W. A.  W. A. Stewart, died August 16 at Blue Jacket, Oklahoma.  His remains were brought to Burrville and placed to rest in Burrville Cemetery. (Morgan County Press dated August 31, 1917)

STRICKLIN, W. Z.,  W. Z.  Stricklin was called to Waynesboro Tuesday on account of the death of his brother who was shot from ambush and killed on the street of Waynesboro Monday night.  (Morgan County Press dated March 1, 1917)










Central High School Honor Roll

First Grade:         Iva Levan, Henry Heidel
Second Grade:    Jessie Cooper
Third Grade:        Ella Crenshaw, Labon Summer, Mary Summer Iva Redmon
Fourth Grade:      Elsia Moates
Fifth Grade:         Lorene Davis, Nellie Hall, Parlia Henry
Seventh Grade:    Merida Byrd, Dixie Davis, Charley Newberry, Madge Ott, Ray Schubert, Roy Schubert,
Ida Taylor, Thelma Zumstein
Eight Grade:         Lee Davis, Marie Heidel, Edna Human, Eva Summer

First year:         Orpha Clark
Second year:    John Joyner
Third Year:      Herbert Bales, Ed Conificius, Netta Clark, Lawrence Newberry, Blanche Ott

Cooking:  Eva Summer, Metta Clark, Otto Schubert
Sewing:    Anna Mae Joyner, Lesie Dean Levan, Emma Summer, Ida Taylor, Marie Heidel, Eva Summer James



Joyner and Pointer Barger, candidates for member of the County Board of Education, were calling on the voters.

Henry Davis and son, Vanus, went out to Marlow Friday to attend the funeral of Lum Smith.

Capt. T.G. Van Meyers, representating the French government, is spending the week in our burg purchasing mules and horses for army service.

By reason of impending strike, effective at once, the O.N.O. & T.P., A.G.S.S.H. & N.E., C.B & C., and Belt of Chattanooga will not accept from shippers any shipment of live stock or perishable freight unless it can reach final destination by regular or usual schedule before September 2, 1916.
Any shipments of explosives or highly inflamable material will not be received.
Please see that shippers and receivers are notified by telephone or otherwise at once, also that local newspapers are given notice so that the informationmay be made available to all concerned.
W.T. Caldwell

The above information was added June 24, 2000……….

Marriage Licenses  and Marriages

January, 1916
Sam Key to Sarah Jane Potter
Lonas Armes to Dallas Dangher

February, 1916
Milton Gray to Mary Hedgecoth
Frank Douglas to Leona Stringfield

August, 1916
W.M. Greder to Stella Underwood
Herbert Staples to Bethie Brasel
Elijha Clark to Bessie Hill

October 1916
Hubert Freels and Della York, 9/28/1916
Martin Redmon and Della Arms
Andrew McDormick and Luverna Zumstein
George Bune and Wettha Jones
Harold Adcock and Mattie Bingham
Reuben Morgan and Lena Wehlhorn  (Mehlhorn?)
Ola Howard and Luverna Cox
(week of 10/20/1916)

December 1916
W. E. Kennedy & Ida Ridener
Geo Leach & Myrtle Gooch
Harry Carlton Jones & Ova Marie Creekmore
Joseph Cox & Dorothy Hall
James Back & Della Adkin
Haywood Wilson & Freddie Butler
Riley Justice & Myrtle Stewart -(see below)
Harry Kreis &  Ida Brasel
William T. Walton & Sarah L. Kinker
Wiley England & Flora Guffey
C. C. Todd & Matilda Jones
John Bradshaw & Maggie Jones
Daniel Webb & Othena Hall
G. Walker & Jennie Wright
Oscar Byrd & Anna McNeil
Chas Walls & Grace Butler
George Heidle & Etta Brown
L. E. Thornton & Oma Jackson
H. Conrad Wilson & Bessie Human
N. J. Stonecipher & Tressie Patrick
Riley JUSTICE and Myrtle STEWART were married by Esq. HOLDER, Dec. 16 1916, on the Pike a short distance east OF Wartburg near Gus Heidel’s.  They were sitting in an auto when the Esquire drove up, married them in short order as he was carrying the mail and could not tarry long on the job.

Harry  KREIS and Ida L. BRASEL were married Christmas morning and left immediately for Knoxville..

James H. GALLOWAY died Jan. 6th at the home of his daughter,
Mrs. Griffith after a long illness.

Martin BROWN died in Atlanta, Ga. Jan 15th with pneumonia. He was a soldier in the US Service. His body was shipped to Burrville for
burial. He leaves a father and mother, two sisters and six brothers.

Martin C. BROWN, died Jan. 16, 1916 at Camp Gordon.  He was formerly from Burrville. He was the son of Mr. & Mrs. Albert Brown who lived at Burrville.  Cause of death was pneumonia.

James T. BUCHANAN, a miner about 30 years of age from Dayton was killed in the CONGER MINES Wednesday by falling slate. He had worked here only two days.  The body was prepared for burial and sent to Dayton for interment.  He leaves a wife and two children. (August 1916)

P.J. CALLAHAN, 72, of Chattanooga died, 8/10/1916 at his home.  Burial in Cincinnatti, Aug 13, 1916.  He was for many years the
passenger conductor between Somerset and Chattanooga.

Infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Jack BROWN was buried Aug. 14, 1916 at M.E. Church Cemetery Sunbright.

William HOWARD, born in Morgan Co., May 16, 1831, died Oct 17, 1916. He married Sarah Williams in 1858. They had seven children, 5 survive.  daughters, Mrs. T. C. DILLON. Mrs. Wilburn STOWERS, and Mrs. Gusty HOWARD.  Sons, Andrew and Perry Howard. Mr.  HOWARD joined the Union Army at the outbreak of the Civil War. Burial in Lavender Cem. Deer Lodge

Jim WOODRUFF, who a week ago stabbed to death JOHN McGINLY on the streets of Harriman, was arrested Saturday at Rockwood.  His preliminary trial was held Saturday afternoon and he was bound over to court with out bond.  He claims the stabbing was in self defense. (week or 8/13/1916)

On July 25, 1916, Elihu HOLDER passed over the divide to the great beyond.  He was in his 73rd year. He was the oldest of seven children and was married in 1869 to Miss Laura SILCOX who died in 1882. There were six children to this union, two survive.About three years later he married Miss Sarah NICHOLS. There were three children to this union. He leaves a wife, 5 sons and 2 daughters. His remains were laid to rest in Liberty Cemetery on July 26.

Mrs. Jeff LAVENDER died week of Aug. 24, 1916.  She suffered a stroke about 2 weeks ago and never recovered.  She was 72 years old.  Burial in Pine Flat Cemetery.

Miss COLLINS of Hillsboro, Ohio. She owned several houses in Deer Lodge and spent the winters among us. (8/1916)

Joe W. LINDSAY of Chattanooga was killed Sunday in a head on collison between his motor cycle and a street car.  He was about 30
years of age and leaves a wife, father and mother, S.W. LINDSAY, and a sister. (8/31/1916)

Mr. HUNT of Michigan who bought the Thomas POTTER place near J.W. BURNS, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor on Saturday evening.  He lived until Monday. (week of10/5/1916)

Mr. M. W. BUXTON, age 91, departed this life Oct.16, 1916. His wife, four sons, and one daughter are left to mourn his loss.

Mr. Joe THORNTON died Oct. 8, 1916. He  leaves a wife, sons and daughters to mourn his  departure.  His remains were laid to
rest in Liberty Cemetery.

Mrs. E. S. JONES. (week of,10/19/1916) burial in Winfield.

The three month’s old child of Esquire R. A. CROSS died last Sunday morning.  The afflicted couple have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement (week of 11/16/1916)

The sad news of the death of Rev. Joseph HERMIE, pastor of St. Anne Church at Deer Lodge and Stowers, was learned Monday morning. Interment in Philadelphia. (week of 12/14/1916)

Mr. A. HENKLE, a well known former resident of Glades, who moved to Chicago a few months ago, died suddenly Dec. 6, 1916.

Aunt Margaret JONES, wife of Mr. W. D. JONES died at Montgomery in her 78th year. She was born in Russell County Va., to Mr. & Mrs. CROMWELL, (Ed Note-Johnson and Anna JACKSON CROMWELL).  She married Daniel GARRETT in 1859. He was captured during the Civil War and died at Belle Isle. Daughter, Mrs. Chas. (Julia) BROWN survives of two children. June 27 she married W. D. JONES. One daughter, who married Wm. HOLSTON died about three years ago. Interment in Lutheran Cemetery. (week of Dec. 28, 1916)

Mrs. Dave JONES who lives close to the White School House, fell dead between her home and a neighbors on Tuesday evening.  A couple of boys who were near by heard her scream and saw her fall.  They ran to her aid but found her dead when they reached her side. (12/1916)

The sad news of the death of Carl SWIFT, which occured last Thursday at their home. He was a brother of one of our former Music teachers, Miss Lillian SWIFT.  (12/1916)

Aunt Eliza DAVIS died at the home of her son. J. M. DAVIS on Dec. 24, 1916 at the ripe age of 80 years
and was buried on Dec 25, in Burrville Cemetery. December, 21, 1916

We regret to give up another of our citizens, (Rugby), but the death angel came to the home of Mr. S.H. GILES and took away Mrs. Sol Giles from us.

January 1916
The weather has registered from five to seven below zero more than once.  Folks are doing with out coal because ice-covered hills are making it difficult to deliver.

August 10, 1916
Bert STEPHENS, who has been in the Navy for the past eight years, made this burg a call last week.  He was visiting his grandmother, Mrs. R.A. DAVIS.

Last Monday Aug. 7, was surely Birthday Day in Sunbright. On that day Hon. Wm. BULLARD celebrated his 56th, Mrs. Bettee ENGLAND her 44th, Chas T. SUMMERS his 40th, Arthur JUSTICE, 22nd, Miss Bessie
HUMAN her 17th and Elizabeth NEIL her 10th birthday.

Mr. Harry HALL and wife are slowly improving from typhoid fever.

Prof. John ALBERTSON and Miss Eva GALLOWAY opened school here on Monday morning of this week (8/10/1916)

Frank DOUGLAS  has given up his position at Catoosa and returned to the Emory.

Little Albert GARRETT is still peddling at Annadell.

Burglars entered the post office here (Coalfield) Friday night and relieved the cash drawer of about $100.  A box of pennies and the stamps were not molested. (8/10/1916)

A horse belonging to Sam WALLS near here was stolen Saturday night and ridden to Petros and turned loose.  Mr. Walls found his horse at Stephen’s Switch with one eye knocked out and otherwise badly abused.  Coalfield (8/10/1916)

Geo. P. McKETHUM and wife, who have been visiting his father, E.H. McKETHUM, have returned to their home in Cario, Ill, on Aug. 17th.

S.T. KIMBELL has purchased 300 acres on the pike road near Sunbright for $4,500. Property is advancing by leaps and bounds along the fines pike in the county!

August 24, 1916
Miss Lina ZUMSTEIN, 1st Asst. teacher in the Sunbright  High School, arrived here last Saturday.

One of the finest plantations in the county passed hands last week — The MAGNOLIA PLANTATION at Stowers formerly owned by S.T. KIMBALL.  Comprised in this estate is upwards of 2000 acres, residences, cleared lands, store buildings and barns.  A large Polish settlement adjoins this estate and a Catholic Church is on the property. The residence of James J. ENGLAND at West

Sunbright was destroyed by fire Sunday night about 8:30.   The fire was caused by a defective flue. August 31, 1916

Several investors here from Champaign, Ill. are expected here this wee to look at land around Stowers.

Next Saturday will see the big auction sale at Glades when Adolph HEINKLE will sell out. They are moving back to Chicago.

Fourteen cars of railroad ties were shipped from Sunbright last week.

Paul T. JONES, president of the Barbor Coal Co., spent Saturday and Sunday in Harriman.

October 5, 1916
Mr. M HUNT  of Michigan, who bought the Thomas Potter place near JH.W. Burns;, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor on Sat. evening last.  He lived until Monday noon.

Roy HOWARD, son of Trustee Howard, blew in from Chicago Monday.
We reckon that the cold chilly winds off Lake Michigan were too much for his liking.

Rev. CALDWELL, (the circuit rider) of Burrville and his father of Lenoir City and Rev. A. C. PETERS were here Sunday.  The elder Caldwell preached an interesting sermon.

S.T. KIMBELL of the Kimbell Land Agency closed up the largest sale of the year in selling the BOYLE Farm of 3500 acres for Oscar PETERSON to Judge C. A. BALES of Jefferson County. This plantation was founded by Lord MONTGOMERY BOYLE of London, England, who invested largely in the county in the early ‘80s, (1880s) together with the English investors who founded the Rugby settlement.

October 12, 1916
Henry LILES suffered the loss of his house by fire a few days since.  The fire was accidental.

Jesse QUINN went to Michigan as an escort with the body of Ben HUTCHINGS, where the remains will be buried.

Edgar RUFFNER and Edgar HOPPER left Monday for Morristown where they expect to attach themselves to some kind of a job.

Mrs. C. PETERS had a serious runaway a few days ago.  A young horse hitched to a buggy became frightened and ran away throwing the occupants from the buggy, considerable injuring the buggy. No one was seriously hurt.

Squire ADCOCK”S court was the scene Tuesday of a very exciting lawsuit, which as to nature is perhaps not duplicated in the court procedure of the county.  Harry GOUGE, who lives near here, was arraigned on the charge of a very grave statutory offence.  The alleged victim and accuser was little Miss Gertrude McDANIEL, aged 13 years.The accused was sent to jail until the next term of Circuit Court at Wartburg.

October 26, 1916
Earnest BARDILL, a quiet farmer of the Lone Mt. community of planters, was arrested and brought to town and tried at the Court House on Monday before Bruno SCHUBERT, a Justice of the Peace, the indictment charging Bardill with Forgery.  The proof showed a check drawn on the Oakdale Bank & Trust Co. by Riley JESTES to Enoch BARDILL and by Enoch BARDILL endorsed.  The check was dated Oct. 8th 1916 and was paid by said bank on Oct. 12, 1916, the check being for $10.00.  The warrant was sworn out by Riley JESTES who denied writing the check and charging said BARDILL with forging his name and getting the money on it.  The defendant was bound over to court, in $1000 bonds which he made and returned to his home that

Nov. 2, 1916
Mr. John KREIS took a load of potatoes to Oakdale Tuesday for Ben BYRD who had sold them to J.C. ALLEY at $1.00 per bushel.  He took another load today.

The county Court met in special session and passed a resolution authorizing the Bridge Commission to let contracts for two more steel bridges to built across Clear Fork, one at Peters Ford and one at Brewster Ford. (re-print from Fentress Co. Gazette)

We regret to have to announce that about 3 o’clock Tuesday afternoon the house of Mr. Pointer BARGER, who lives on the Wartburg and Petros Road about nine miles from Wartburg was totally destroyed by fire.  Mr. Barger is a poor man and has a large family who are turned out of home with only the clothes they had on.

November 16, 1916
The High School Students, who are under the supervision of Miss Sadie RAMSEY, will give a two hour play on the evening of Dec. 9, at 7 o’clock in the high school auditorium.

On Sunday last, St. Peter left the Gates of Heaven ajar and a bright little angel boy, wended its way down to earth and took up its abode in the happy home of Mr. & Mrs. J.E. TANNER We are please to announce that mother and child are doing nicley. November  30, 1916

The H & F E E R R is having some wells dug near the depot, and will erect a water tank here. (Coalfield)

Mart VANN, our barber, fell from his barn loft a few mornings since and sustained some very bad bruises, though no serious injuries.

R.D. McGLOTHIN, aged about 60 years, who is subject to epilepsy, fell from a railroad trestle a week ago during one of his attacks and was very seriously hurt. Since the accident he has been scarcely in a conscious condition and his life is dispaired of.

John B. YORK accidently fell from his wagon last Friday. The wagon which was loaded with crossties ran over him, dislocating his left shoulder and otherwise injuring him..  Drs JONES and EASLEY were called and soon set the bones.Mr. YORK is some better and at this writing is confined to his room.

There is quite a building boom in Wartburg. Some are building, while others putting up additons.

December 14, 1916
Mr. Clarence Brown met with a painful accident last Satruday in falling from a wagon he dislocated his elbow. (Burrville)

Mr. A. HENKLE a well known former resident of Glades, who moved to Chicago a few months ago, died suddenly Dec. 6th from the effects of a bad cold which settled in his lungs. (Deer Lodge)

During the sitting of the Grand Jury this week, the case of Ernest BARDILL, which was a bound over case from Squire SCHUBERT’S court held Oct. 23, in which Mr. BARDILL was held for his appearance at this term of court on a charge of passing a bogus check.The Grand Jury, after examing the witnesses, decided that Mr. Bardill was not guilty and refused to indict him.  Mr. BARDILL is a quiet and respectable citizen of the Lone Mountain Country.

We regret to learn that Friday, Dec. 22, will be the last day of our school here for the winter.  Our school has been taught this term by Mr. William Powell of the third district. Mr. Powell psosesses all the qualities which go to make a successful teacher.
December 21, 1916 – Letters from SANTA:
Dear Santa: I am 5 years old, and of course I want lots and lots of things, but I am just going to ask for the things I want most and I will then expect to get them.  Please bring me a toy piano, a big doll and a teddy bear.  I was about to forget to tell you to bring me some irons to iron my doll clothes.  I shall expect what I’ve asked for, with lots of candy, oranges and apples.  Love to you and Mrs. Santa.     Charlotte Aytes, Frankfort.
Dear Santa, I am a little boy 5 years old and I want you to bring me a little wagon and a toy dog and a horse and some apples, oranges candy and nuts.  The is all I will ask for this time. Good By.
Granville McPETERS
Please Dear Santa: Bring us a doll, a little wagon and candy,
oranges and nuts and don’t forget our little sister Ava.  Please bring us a little lamp too.
Wilma and Lela Stone, Rockwood, Rte 3
Dear Santa; I am a little girl 10 years old.  Please bring me a pair of gloves and a handkerchief box, and don’t forget my little sister, Tressie, and bring her an unbreakable doll and some candy; so good by Santa,
Georgia Dilbeck, Wartburg.
We will pay 30 cents for Eggs and 25 cents per
pound for Butter, in cash.  SCHUBERT’S STORE.

December 28, 1916
“A.F. NACE, editor of the Morgan County Banner at Oakdale, has been called to his home near York, Pa, hence this week’s issue of the Banner will be omitted.  Nr. Nace was called to his home to attend the funeral of his dear mother.

Mr. A. HONEYCUTT has been at Knoxville for the past two weeks
on the Federal Jury.

Mr. J. S. GREER has been suffering for two weeks with a sprained wrist which was caused while cranking his machine.  The little Ford kicked!

Mr. J.M. PETETT and family have returned from California.

Mrs. W.B. CRENSHAW and the children spent Christmas evening and
Tuesday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson ROBINSON.

August 10, 1916
Squire Adcock’s court was the scene of a lively legal tilt here Saturday.  
The MORRISON Brothers, proprietors of the Oliver Springs Brick Yard, were on trial for felonious assualt on William Settle.  The evidence pointed in opposite directions and the defendents were acquitted.

October 12, 1916
Squire ADCOCK’S court was the scene Tuesday of a very exciting lawsuit, which as to
nature is perhaps not duplicated in the court procedure of the county.  Harry GOUG
who lives near here, was arraigned on the charge of a very grave statutory offence.  The
alleged victim and accuser was little  Miss Gertrude McDANIEL, age 13 years.  The crime
is said to have been committed Saturday evening week near the Prudential Mines. 
Gouge was arrested by Constable W.H. WARD and brought before Equires ADCOCK 
and WEBSTER who after hearing the evidence of the little girl and  Gouge’s father,
committed the accused to jail until the next term of Circuit Court at Wartburg.  The State
was represented by Harvey Ward and the defendent by J.M. DAVIS and C.C.JACKSON

October 26, 1916
   Earnest BARDILL, a quiet farmer of the Lone Mountain community of planters, was
arrested and brought to town and tried at the Court House in Wartburg on Monday of this
week, before Bruno SCHUBERT, a Justice of the Peace, the indictment charging
BARDILL with forgery.  
  The proof showed that a check was drawn on the Oakdale Bank & Trust Co, by Riley
JESTES to Enoch BARDILL  and by Enoch BARDILL endorsed.The check was dated
Oct. 8th 1916, and was paid by said bank on Oct. 12th, 1916, the
check being for $10.00.
   The warrent was sworn out by Riley JESTES who denied writing the check; and
charging said BARDILL with forging his name and getting the money on it.
  Since a Justice of the Peace tries such cases on the probable cause of guilt and not upon
the reasonable doubt, the defendant was bound over to court, in $1,000 bonds which he
made and returned to his home that evening.

December, 14, 1916
  During the sitting of the Grand Jury this week the case of Ernest BARDILL, which was
a bound over case from Squire SCHUBERT’S court held Oct. 23, in which Mr.
BARDILL was held for appearance at this term of court on a charge of passing a bogus
check upon the bank at Oakdale.  The grand Jury, after examing the witnesses decided
that Mr. Bardill was not guilty and refused to indict him.  He is a quiet and respectable
citizen of the Lone Mountain country.

Met Dec. 11, 1916 with Judge HICKS on the bench and  States Attorney W.H. BUTTRAM and Charles W. SUMMER, Clerk in attendance.

The following cases were heard and disposed of:

State vs:

W W CHRISTMAS, case nollied on costs. 
James BRANDENBURG, murder, continued 
James COFFEE, carrying arms, continued 
R. ANGEL and Chas. ARP, felonious assault, 
not guilty 
A.M. CARDELL carrying arms, not guilty 
William GOOCH, felonious assault, found 
guilty of simple assault, fined $40 and costs. 
unlawfully selling liquor, continued 
Charles ROGERS, cruelty to animals, nullied 
J.F. EVANS, carrying weapons, continued by State.

State vs: 
W. COFFEY, keeping female dog, $5.00 and cost. 
Jas HANSFORD, drunkeness, nullie on cost 
Walter Williams,  nullied on costs 
Arch WEAVER,unlawfully selling liquor, fined $50 and sixty days. 
Adam DAUGERTY, carrying arms, fined $50 and thirty days. 
Adam DAUGERTY, selling liquor to minors, fined $25 and cost. 
Gilbert LANGLEY, carry arms, fined $50 and cost. 
A.P. GOLDSTON, et al forfiture, nullied on cost. 
Harvey GOUCH, rape, acquitted of rape and hung jury 
  on age of consent. 
Adam DAUGERTY, carry concealed arms, not guilty 
On Friday afternoon the court adjourned over to January 19, 1917 



Marion M. Justice lived to be 101.
He was born June 26, 1850 and died April 11, 1951.
He was married to Telithia Caroline Brummitt on Nov. 20, 1871.
His parents were Squire Justice and Serah Russell.  Marion and Caroline are buried in the Estes Cemetery  in Coalfield.


Obituary for M.M. Justice

M.M. Justice of Coalfield died April 11,, 1951 at the age of 100 years, nine months and fifteen days. He was probably the oldest man in East Tennessee.  He was the son of Esquire Justice and Sally Russell Justice. He was married to Telethia Caroline Brummitt in the year 1871 and was the father of the following children: Mrs. Florence Cheek of Harriman, Mrs. Serelda Sisson of Oliver Springs, Judge J.H. Justice of Wartburg; Mrs. Arpie Jackson of Coalfield and three children who died in infancy.Mr. Justice joined the Pleasant Grove Baptist Church in early life. He was a great admirer of Abraham Lincoln and went to the election with his father when Lincoln ran doe president. He worked on the public roads of Morgan County from the time he was 18 years of age until he was 50 years old, this being a legal requirement at that time. Mr. Justice was strictly sober and had a supreme hatred for strong drinks.  He was loyal to his family and friends and especially to his God.  He believed in law and order and stood strictly by his convictions until the day of his departure. He probably had more knowledge of the early history of Morgan and Anderson Counties than any man living in recent years.  He could readily tell you the boundaries of the original tracts of land in this county.  Mr. Justice was a pioneer of the old school and was always ready to give admonition and advice to the rising generation, especially if he thought they were taking the wrong course. He was known for his knowledge of the Bible and made it a life-long study. He was a great believer in honesty and truthfulness and tried in every way and truthfulness and tried in every way possible to impress upon his family and friends the great worth of practicing such virtues. Mr Justice spent his entire life in Morgan County.Funeral services were held at the Pleasant Grove Baptist Church on April 13th at 11:00 A.M. with Rev. David McGlothin and Rev. Williams officiating and was laid to rest in the Estes Cemetery. Sharp’s of Oliver Springs in charge.  [Morgan County News, 4-19-1951]

-Obituary for Telitha Caroline Brummitt Justice

Mrs. Justice was born May 18, 1846, in Anderson County, Tennessee near the little station known as Marlow, in that county; her maiden name was Telitha Caroline Brummitt.  Her father’s names was James Brummitt and her mother’s name was Serelda Brown Brummitt.
Mrs. Justice leaves to mourn her loss her husband, M.M. Justice, who is in his 79th  year, and the following children:  Mrs. Florence Cheek of  Coal Hill, Mrs. R.A. Sisson of Oliver Springs, Mrs. Arpie Jackson of Coalfield, Judge S.H. Justice of Wartburg, and Horace Justice of Coalfield and three infant children who died in early life, making eight children born to this union.  She is also survived by sixteen grand-children and twenty great-grandchildren, and one brother, the Rev. W.R. Brummitt of Oliver Springs; and one sister, Mrs. Mary A. Freybarger, living at Hamilton, Ohio.  Mrs. Justice was 13 years of age when the war between the North and the South was declared, and many times during her life, while in a reminiscent mood, she would tell of the many struggles and trials that she had undergone during that war.  In Feb. 1862, her father was shot and killed through a crack in the door during the early part of the night, after a hard days work clearing a new ground, while he had one of his younger children in his arms.  At the report of the gun the father of Mrs. Justice dropped the child from his arms and fell with his hands in the fire.  There being no one in the house at this time, except the father of Mrs. Justice, her mother, who was very ill and confined to her bed; the little child and Mrs. Justice, who was then only 13 years of age.  After the fatal shot had been fired, Mrs. Justice locked her arms under the arms of her dead father, pulling him out of the fire and straightening out his lifeless body on the floor.  At this time the mother of Mrs. Justice thought in all probability that their house was surrounded by enemies, so she ordered that the light be extinguished and the fire covered up until an investigation could be made and the neighbors notified.  In this condition, Mrs. Justice with her sick mother in bed kept a vigilant watch through the night while her father lay a lifeless corps on the floor before them.
During the year 1862, while the war between the states was still raging, Mrs. Justice’s older brother Wiley Brummitt, had enlisted in the Union Army and was stationed at Fishing Creek, Ky., and while there got a permit or furlough to visit his wife, mother and sisters in Anderson County, Tenn.  He came home and stayed a few days and while returning back to his regiment across the mountain and down New River, he was encountered by a bunch of guerillas, whose purpose was to loot, steal and kill and the ran Mr. Brummitt into the river and shot him in the face; then it was that Mrs. Justice, though a girl in her early teens, was again called to a trying ordeal.  She walked from Anderson County by way of Blowing Springs, where Windrock mines are now situated, but arrived after her brother had been buried in the old White Grave Yard in the 10th district of Anderson County on New River.  She met her duties boldly, and got her brother’s haver sack, as she always called it, his shot pouch and army rifle, after which she wended her way back across the mountain to her old home near Marlow.
She had a brother names Gilbert Brummitt, who died at Somerset, Ky., while serving in the Union Army.  She had another brother names Moses Brummitt, who also was a soldier in the Union Army, who was captured by the Confederate soldiers and imprisoned on Belle Isle, who died there during that great struggle.  W.R. Brummitt who is now living at Oliver Springs, served in the Union Army, 3 years, 7 months and 17 days, and was honorable discharged.  He is now in this 85th year.  Mrs. Justice had a sister by the name of Martha Brummitt, who married one Daniel Jones of Morgan County; this sister died in Roane County many years ago.  She had two younger brothers, namely, James and Rufus, who were not old enough to enlist in the army, both have been dead several years.
Mrs. Justice was a member of the Baptist Church for near 60 years; she was a strong believer in the Baptist faith, but first of all she believed in God.  She loved her family and her friends and was ever ready to speak a good word to those in trouble.  She was married to M.M. Justice, Nov. 26, 1871 by Squire Thos. Davis, who was one of the old pioneers of this county.
Mrs. Justice used to tell of the many hardships and privations that she and the other members of her family were subjected to during the Civil War, and on one occasion, she told of her mother owning a find young mare, and while the Confederate soldiers were passing through the country, she bridled and led this young mare away from the main road out into the forest and kept her there all night for fear she would be taken away from them.  She said that this young mare could hear the other horses passing the road and would attempt to squeal or nicker to them, as she called it, and at each time she would take her bonnet and wrap it around the mare’s mouth and nostrils to keep the soldiers who were passing the road from hearing the squeal of the animal.
Mrs Justice had many friends and no enemies in so far as we know, and will be long remembered and never forgotten.[Morgan County News, December 13, 1928]