Biography: BRYANT, Thomas H.

THOMAS H. BRYANT is a native of Maury County, Tenn., and was born August 15, 1839, and was reared on a farm. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F, Third Tennessee Regiment, under Col. J.C. Brown. He was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson and taken to Camp Douglas, where he was imprisoned seven months. He was then exchanged at Vicksburg and immediately rejoined the army. He participated in many battles and was wounded and captured at Raymond, Miss. After his release he again joined his command, stationed at Meridian, Miss. He was disabled there and came home on furlough, and was captured and paroled near the first of 1864. June 4, 1866, he wedded Emma J. Howard, born February 20, 1847, in Maury County. They have four children: James H., Hattie W., Frank L. and Bessie M. Mr. and Mrs. Bryant are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and he belongs to the Democratic party. His parents, Edward and Elizabeth (Amis) Bryant, were both born in Granville County, N. C., in 1778 and 1797, respectively. The father was a farmer and miller. He was a soldier in the war of 1812 and was a Whig in politics. He died in 1867 or 1868, and the mother about 1885.

Source: History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford and Marshall Counties. Nashville, Tenn: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1886.


Biography: BRYANT, Andrew D.

ANDREW D. BRYANT, one of Maury County’s most enterprising citizens, was born in Franklin County, North Carolina, March 14, 1825, and is the son of John F. and Sarah W. (Amis) Bryant, who were born in 1790 and 1794, respectively. The father, John F., was the son of Roland and Mary (Hunt) Bryant, and Roland was the son of William Bryant, who was born in Ireland, John F. was a successful farmer, was married in 1814, and was the father of ten children. He died December 6, 1857, and his wife followed him to the grave in 1870. Our subject was reared on a farm and obtained a limited education in the country schools, and followed farming for eight years, in Dallas County, Ark. He then moved to Maury County, Tenn., where he now resides, engaged in farming and stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. He was married, January 4, 1852, to Sarah Hill, a native of Tennessee, born in June, 1828, and the  daughter of Isaac and Margaret (Steele) Hill. Isaac Hill was born in North Carolina, in 1800, and died in Marshall County, Tenn., in 1840. To our subject and wife were born eight children: James R., born 1854; Isaac H., born 1856; John F., born 1857; William T., born 1859; Ida R., born 1861; Andrew D., born 1863; Patrick H., born 1866, and Lizzie H., born 1869. Mr. Bryant has given his children a good education and has reason to be proud of them. In 1874 he was engaged in building two miles of railroad, and also built switch and station houses. In 1877 he engaged in the saw and grist-mill business. He took an active part in the Confederate service during the late war, enlisting in Company H, Fifty-third Regiment, and served two years. He was first lieutenant, and his captain being wounded at Fort Donelson, Mr. Bryant took his place as captain. Our subject was captured and taken to Indianapolis, Johnson’s Island, Camp Chase and at Vicksburg, where he was exchanged. He is an enterprising and successful farmer and stock raiser, and is highly spoken of by his many friends.

Source: History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford and Marshall Counties. Nashville, Tenn: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1886.


Biography: AMIS, Rebecca T.

Mrs. REBECCA T. AMIS, a native of Maury County, Tenn,, was born in 1839, and is a daughter of Col. Jonas and Martha (Adkisson) Thomas, who were born in the “Old Dominion.” The father came to Tennessee at an early day, and became an eminent lawyer and politician. He represented Maury County in both branches of the State Legislature, and was speaker of the State Senate one term, and as parliamentarian had no superior. He was once nominated for Congress, but owing to ill health was compelled to withdraw from the race. His demise occurred August 3, 1856. The mother died January 14, 1870. Mrs. Amis, our subject, was married October 13, 1857, to John E. Amis, and two children blessed their union; Bruce E. and Jonas T. Mr. Amis took an active part in the late war, and was a member of the gallant Forty-eighth Tennessee Infantry. He was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson, and died in prison in St. Louis, Mo., in 1863. Mrs. Amis is a finely educated woman, and has won quite a reputation as an instructress, having taught at the Atheneum, at Columbia, and in the Tennessee College at Franklin, and also in public schools at that place. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

Source: History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford and Marshall Counties. Nashville, Tenn: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1886.