GOODLOE, Granville

Granville Goodloe, M. A., was born at Tulip, Ark., January 23, 1857. He was the eldest of twelve children of the Rev. Dr. A. Theodore Goodloe and Sallie Louise, daughter of Granville La Force Cockrill and Louise M. Turner. Dr. Goodboe was a native of Maury County, Tenn.; was educated at the University of Virginia, took the degree of M.D. at Hampden Sidney College, Virginia, and practiced two years in Bellevue Hospital. Just before the war he settled with his brother in St. Francis County, Ark., and engaged in farming. He entered the Confederate service in April, 1862, as third lieutenant in the Thirty-fifth Alabama Regiment; the same year he was promoted to first lieutenant, for gallantry; he served through the war, and in 1868 entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as an itinerant preacher, in which he is still engaged. His wife is a native of Tuscumbia, Ala., and a relative of the Cockrills and Hardings, of Nashville; her great-grandfather, John Cockrill, was the first white man married in Middle Tennessee. His wife was a sister of Gen. James Robertson.

The subject of this sketch, Mr. Granville Goodloe, was a pupil of the Culleoka Institute (Webb. School) for three and one-half years. In 1873-75 he was a student of Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and from 1875 to 1879 of the Vanderbilt University, where he was the first to take the degree of M. A., May 30, 1879. In 1879-80 he was principal of the Black River High School in Smithville, Ark. In the summer of 1880 he became associated with his classmate, the Rev. E. R. Chappell, as joint principal of McKenzie College, as McTyeire Institute was then called. He still presides over this institution. He is a member of the Methodist Church.


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.