DAVIS, Jesse T.

Jesse T. Davis, an enterprising young farmer and citizen of Haywood County, was born in the county September 8, 1862, and is the son of John C. and Matilda L. (CORE) Davis. His father was twice married.

In 1853 he married Miss Martha CORE, who died two years after she was married, and in 1855 Mr. Davis married Miss Matilda CORE, a sister of his first wife. She was born in Haywood County in about 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Davis were both devout members of the Methodist Church, he being a steward in the same, and Mrs. Davis taking an active interest in the Sunday-school. Jesse T. Davis had fine opportunities for acquiring a good education. He was principally educated at the Vanderbilt University at Nashville. In 1881 he attended on session at Bryant & Stratton’s Commercial College, of Louisville, Ky., but decided to make farming his work, so when twenty-one years of age he settled on the old homestead, and has since given his time to the farm.

October 26, 1882, he married Miss Minnie S. SANGSTON, born in Haywood County, November 5, 1864, and they have a son and a daughter from this marriage. Mr. Davis is a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Church, and is a justly popular young man. His father was a native of South Carolina, born in 1830.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

CROSS, George W.

George W. CROSS, a prominent lawyer of Manchester, Tenn., was born in Anderson County August 31, 1849. He is the son of William and Jane (Black) CROSS, both of English descent and natives of Anderson County. The former, born in 1810, is still living; the latter, born about 1820, died February 26, 1885. Married in 1836 the elder CROSS engaged in farming. He is a Democrat, and sympathizes with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of which his wife was a member.

Our subject, the fifth of eight children, was educated chiefly at Cumberland University,at Lebanon, Tenn., and the military school of Knoxville, Tenn., from which he graduated in September, 1874. After three years’ teaching in Decherd and Salem, Tenn., in September, 1877, he took ten months at Vanderbilt University Law Department, and the professor granted him license to practice. Since 1878,when he came to Manchester, he has become one of the most successful lawyers of Coffee County and among the ablest in this section. January 17, 1882, he married Beulah HICKERSON, born in 1861, the daughter of Judge W.P. HICKERSON. She was a cultured lady. Her death occurred July 24,1885. Mr. CROSS is a decided Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BOOTH, A.W.

A.W. BOOTH, M.D., a prominent citizen and leading physician of Tullahoma, Tenn., was born in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1858,and is the son of J.B. and Elizebeth (Vannoy) BOOTH. Our subject was reared on the farm, and educated in the public schools. In 1879 he began the study of medicine, and graduated from Vanderbilt University in 1881. The same year he began practicing in his native county, but soon removed to Tullahoma, where he has since lived and succeeded in building up one of the best practices in the town.

October 29, 1884, he was married to Ella, daughter of Capt. C.H. BEAN, of Moore County, Tenn. Mrs. BOOTH is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and our subject is a member of the A.O.U.W. Lodge.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

ORR, W.C.

W. C. ORR and family reside in the Eighth Civil District of Bedford County, Tenn., six miles north of Shelbyville, their home being located on the Middletown road.  The family consists of the father, above named, born February 14, 1829, and four children: William M., born November 6, 1854; David F., born June 6, 1859; Mary A., born March 18, 1862, and Minnie J., born August 3, 1866.  There are two vacancies in the family, caused by the death of the mother, Temperance Orr (nee Miller), born in August, 1830, and died May 14, 1876, and John Fain, the eldest child, who died in infancy.

W. C. Orr is of Scotch-Irish descent, and is a son of John and Penelope (Morgan) Orr, who were early settlers of Bedford County, being emigrants from the Carolinas.  Mr. Orr is a farmer, and served as magistrate of his district from 1870 to 1876.  His wife was a daughter of Nathaniel Miller, of Rutherford County, and married our subject in 1854.  She was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.  Mr. Orr obtained a fair education in the common branches, and became an adept in penmanship, which he taught a few years.  In 1878 he began the study of medicine under Drs. Evans & Fite, of Shelbyville, and the same year attended lectures in the medical department of the Vanderbilt University, of Nashville, Tenn., and read and practiced at home until the fall of 1881, when he attended his second course in the same institution and took his degree at the close of the spring term of 1882.  Returning home he located with his father, where he has since practiced his chosen profession.

D. F. Orr, son of W. C. Orr, received a common school education, and attended the Shelbyville Normal and High School for three years, and graduated in 1879.  He afterward taught in the various public schools of Bedford and Rutherford Counties, and in the fall of 1884 attended his first course of lectures in the Vanderbilt University.  He returned home and taught school eight months, and then returned to college and graduated at the close of the session in 1886.  Mary A. Orr also received a good education, having attended the Shelbyville Normal and High School, the Soule Female College at Murfreesboro and the Winchester Normal College.  For several years she has been teaching in Bedford and Rutherford Counties.  Minnie J. Orr attended school two years at the Winchester Normal, and is now teaching her first school.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

LAWS, Dudley S.

Dudley S. Laws, M.D., of Clarksburg, was born in Carroll County, Tenn., in 1829, and is the second of six children, three of whom are living. The father, Hiram Laws, was of English ancestry, born in Orange County, N.C., November 17, 1803. His father, George Laws, is supposed to be a son of one of three brothers, John, George and James, who emigrated from England about 1620, and settled in Maryland, where they figured quite prominently among the business men of that State. Hiram was reared by a mother’s tender care, his father dying while he was quite small. He acquired sufficient education to enable him to enter the teacher’s profession, which he followed for a number of years. About 1825 he married Jincey Ann Sims, and immediately started for Maury County, Tenn., where he remained one year. He then came to Carroll County and settled in the Twelfth District, and in 1834 removed to Alabama, but in 1836 returned to Carroll County, where he passed the remainder of his days. He died in 1879. Mrs. Laws was also a native of North Carolina, born May 2, 1807, and died in 1878.

Our subject was reared under the parental roof, and received his education in the country schools and in Huntingdon, but acquired the most of his knowledge and ability through his own application. He possesses an intellect of extraordinary brilliancy, and soon became master of all the mathematical branches, and had a good knowledge of the languages. He afterward spent twelve years teaching, and was one of the most successful and popular educators of this portion of the State. In 1861 he commenced the study of physic, and two years later entered Rush Medical College, and at the close of the Rebellion entered as a partner with his former preceptor, and began the practice of his chosen profession. In 1871 he entered the medical department of the University of Nashville and Vanderbilt University, and graduated in 1873. He then returned to Clarksburg and continued his practice with well-deserved success. He was for eight years school commissioner of his district, which position he declined to hold longer. He is at present one of the trustees of Clarksburg Male and Female Academy. He is a Republican in politics, a Mason and the owner of 700 acres of land.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

GOODLOE, Granville

Granville Goodloe, M. A., was born at Tulip, Ark., January 23, 1857. He was the eldest of twelve children of the Rev. Dr. A. Theodore Goodloe and Sallie Louise, daughter of Granville La Force Cockrill and Louise M. Turner. Dr. Goodboe was a native of Maury County, Tenn.; was educated at the University of Virginia, took the degree of M.D. at Hampden Sidney College, Virginia, and practiced two years in Bellevue Hospital. Just before the war he settled with his brother in St. Francis County, Ark., and engaged in farming. He entered the Confederate service in April, 1862, as third lieutenant in the Thirty-fifth Alabama Regiment; the same year he was promoted to first lieutenant, for gallantry; he served through the war, and in 1868 entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as an itinerant preacher, in which he is still engaged. His wife is a native of Tuscumbia, Ala., and a relative of the Cockrills and Hardings, of Nashville; her great-grandfather, John Cockrill, was the first white man married in Middle Tennessee. His wife was a sister of Gen. James Robertson.

The subject of this sketch, Mr. Granville Goodloe, was a pupil of the Culleoka Institute (Webb. School) for three and one-half years. In 1873-75 he was a student of Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and from 1875 to 1879 of the Vanderbilt University, where he was the first to take the degree of M. A., May 30, 1879. In 1879-80 he was principal of the Black River High School in Smithville, Ark. In the summer of 1880 he became associated with his classmate, the Rev. E. R. Chappell, as joint principal of McKenzie College, as McTyeire Institute was then called. He still presides over this institution. He is a member of the Methodist Church.


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.