BAIN, Sam C.D. (Dr.)

Dr. Sam. C. D. BAIN, farmer and physician of the Tenth District, was born in Sumner County, February 14, 1831, and was one of ten children born to John R. and Sarah E. Bain. The father was born in North Carolina in 1793, and moved with his parents to Tennessee when a child. They located first in East Tennessee, then moved to Sumner County. He was a Presbyterian minister, and also engaged in teaching; he died in 1868. His mother’s maiden name was CROCKETT. She was a distant relative of David Crockett, and was born in Williamson County in 1801, and died in 1878.

Dr. Bain was educated at the Nashville University, and remained in that city until the close of the war. In 1851 he commenced reading medicine under Drs. Watson and Briggs, at the same time attending lectures at the medical university, and graduated in 1854, and the same year married Miss Delphine HALL, who was born in Giles County in 1836, and died in 1877. The had two children: J. Watson and Josie (wife of Baldwin LUCAS).

Dr. Bain moved to Haywood County in 1857, and located where he now lives; he has had an extensive practice, and also engaged in farming, owning 640 acres of good land. In 1878 he married Miss Emma GRIFFIN, daughter of A. J. and Lean Griffin. Mrs. Bain was a native of Mississippi. Hugh, ages seven years; Ethel, aged five years; Emma May, aged three years, and Maunsel, aged about three months, are the children blessing their union. Dr. Bain is a Democrat and a Mason.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

WOOTEN, J.D.

J. D. WOOTON, M.D., a leading physician of Manchester, was born in Warren County,Tenn., April 5, 1840. He is the son of Jonathan and Nancy (Hampton) WOOTON, the former born in 1792 in North Carolina, and died in Warren County, in 1877; the latter born in 1802 in Kentucky, and died in February,1886. The elder WOOTON was a farmer, a soldier of the Revolution, and a consistent member of the Christian Church, while in political faith he was a Whig. His wife, a near relative of Gen. Wade HAMPTON, was a member of the Baptist Church.

Our subject, the youngest of six children, received, besides his early education, a course at Burritt College. He soon after sold goods for his brother-in-law, Dr. A.B. DAVIS, at what is now Viola. In 1859 he entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, and graduated before he reached his majority. He soon enlisted as second lieutenant in Company D, Thirty-fifth Tennessee Regiment Infantry, Confederate Army. He served as assistant surgeon, and acted as chief surgeon at various times. He acquired considerable reputation for skill in his long service, surrendering with Johnston at Greensboro, N.C. A hip-joint amputation of the leg of a comrade might be mentioned as an example of his skill and then confidence of his fellows. He located at Viola, and for fifteen years was one of the leading physicians of the county.

Since 1880 he has been equally successful in Manchester, engaging also in merchandising with a stock of $10,000, the care of his two plantations of 1,500 and 450 acres in Coffee and Warren Counties, the latter of which feeds a stock of about 100 young mules. He owns a half interest in the Duck River Paper Mills,the largest south of the Ohio River, and the only ones in Tennessee, that make wood pulp. He is a self-made man. July 20, 1865, he married Fannie HICKERSON, a cultured lady, daughter of Judge W.P. HICKERSON. They have two children: Wade H., aged seventeen, and Lillie, aged twenty. Mr. WOOTON is a believer in the Christian religion, though not a member of any church, while in political faith he is Democratic. Mrs. WOOTON is a member of the Christian Church.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

FARISS, William M.

William M. FARISS, M.D., a leading citizen and physician of Tullahoma, Tenn., was born in Franklin County, Tenn., April 22,1834,and is the son of William and Martha (Clardy) FARISS, natives of South Carolina. The father died in 1861 and the mother in 1874. Both were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Our subject was brought up on the farm and attended the public schools. In 1854 he began the study of medicine at Winchester, with Dr. Wallace ESTILL as preceptor. Later he attended several courses of lectures, and in March, 1858, graduated from the medical department of the University of Nashville. He at once began practicing in Franklin County, Tenn., and continued until he entered the Confederate Army, joining Company D, of Turney’s First Regiment of Tennessee Infantry as private. He was appointed assistant surgeon and assigned duty with the Fifth Alabama Battalion. Subsequently he was elected first lieutenant of his old company with which he continued during the war. At the battle of Gettysburg he was seriously wounded in the thigh, captured and held as prisoner for twenty-one months.

After the war he returned to his old home and took care of his aged mother, practicing his profession. In 1869 he removed to Tullahoma to practice where he has resided ever since, and built up a large and lucrative practice. October 17, 1967, our subject was married to Amanda M., daughter of C.J. TAYLOR of Franklin County, Tenn., and to them have been born nine children, two of whom are dead. Our subject and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is a member of the I.O.O.F., F. & A.M., and A.O.U.W. lodges. Politically he is a Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

DAY, James A.

James A. DAY, M.D., was born near his present home February 11, 1840, the son of Samuel B. and Winnie (Evans) DAY, the former of Scotch-Irish stock, born January 15, 1800 in Albemarle County, Va., and deceased December 19, 1875, and the latter born in May, 1804, in this county, and deceased August 6, 1886.  They lived on Sycamore Creek as farmers all their married lives.  He was a Democrat, and both were Primitive Baptists.  

Our subject, the ninth of eleven children, and the only living one, was educated at Tazewell College, and began the study of medicine under Dr. McNEIL, of that place.  In 1862 he enlisted in the Twelfth Battalion Tennessee Confederate Cavalry, commanded by his brother, Maj. G.W. DAY, and became hospital steward and assistant surgeon, and served in that capacity during the war.  He quit the service after Johnston surrendered in North Carolina.  

In 1864-65 he attended Richmond Confederate Medical College, established for undergraduates, and in 1865-66 attended the University of Nashville, graduating with first honors.  He then located at Tazewell, and at once got a big practice, but the country being so impoverished during the war the pay was small.  Hence, in October, 1867, he moved west and located at Halleck, northwest Missouri, where he had a lucrative practice for four years.  But on account of bad health he returned to East Tennessee, in 1872, and in 1876 bought the old homestead, a farm of about 1,280. Since then he has been a planter, besides practicing.  He has made quite a local reputation as a surgeon and practitioner.

In 1867 he married Sallie EPPES, a daughter of William EPPES, and has had eight sons and one daughter, two of the former and the latter being deceased.  Our subject is a Democrat and Prohibitionist, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, while his wife is a Methodist.

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

MORTON, Q.E.

Q. E. MORTON was born September 25, 1835, in Bedford County, Tenn., find is the son of Jacob and Annie (Fisher) Morton.  The father was born February 17, 1787, in North Carolina, immigrated to Tennessee about 1814, and engaged in the blacksmith trade.  He was the first alderman of Shelbyville.  The mother was also a native of North Carolina, and her marriage to Jacob Morton, September 12, 1815, resulted in the birth of fourteen children.

Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and at the age of twenty began farming for himself, and this he continued very successfully up to the time of the late war.  In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army, in the Twenty-third Tennessee Infantry, remaining but thirteen months in the regular service, when he was appointed sutler of his regiment.  He was soon captured, and upon being released returned home and engaged in agricultural pursuits, which he has continued up to the present time.  Previous to the war, in 1855, he wedded Nancy M. Jackson, of this county.  To them were born seven children: John J.; Martha E., wife of E. C. Barnes; Mark J., a practicing physician of Center Grove, who was born September 8, 1864, and graduated from the medical department of the State University, of Nashville.  Prior to entering the university he had studied medicine for three years.  He has at present quite a good practice, which is constantly increasing.

The fourth child of our subject is Q. Emmet; sixth, Rufus H., seventh Nannie R. and eighth James L. Mr. Morton is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church.  He was elected magistrate in 1882, and this office he filled in a highly satisfactory manner.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

McCRORY, Thomas Chapman (Dr.)

DR. THOMAS CHAPMAN McCRORY, an eminent physician, was born in Bedford County, November 13, 1834, and is the son of John and Annie (Wilson) McCrory.  He is of Scotch-Irish extraction.  The father was born in Mechlenburg County, N. C., February 5, 1788, and the mother in Georgia, October 11, 1791.  They were married in Marshall County, Tenn., and were the parents of twelve children.  The father died October 13, 1874, and the mother January 22, 1864.

Our subject had the advantage of a good common school education, and afterward read medicine with Dr. Smith Bowlin.  He then attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati and completed his studies, receiving his diploma from the Medical University at Nashville, from which institution he graduated in 1867.  He  enlisted in Company D, Second Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, and served as lieutenant of the regiment under Col. (now Gov.) Bate.  Dr. McCrory was made assistant surgeon, but preferred a more active part and took his place in the regiment.  He participated in the battle of the first Manassas, Murfreesboro, Shiloh, Chickamauga and the various battles between Chattanooga and Atlanta.  He was captured during Hood’s advance in Tennessee, and taken a prisoner to Fort Delaware, where he remained until Lee’s surrender.

Since the war he has followed his chosen profession, and has at this time a very large and lucrative practice.  February 28, 1860, he wedded Miss Sallie J. Knott, daughter of Iverson Knott.  This union resulted in the birth of eight children only three of whom are living: Thomas F., Eugene and Alva.  The Doctor is a Democrat and a Mason. Mrs. McCrory is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

LANDIS, George L. (Dr.)

GEORGE L. LANDIS, M. D., was born in Bedford County March 31, 1847, son of Bryant and Margaret (Ogilvie) Landis.  His early days were spent in laboring on his father’s farm and in attending the common schools.  October 5, 1865, he began the study of medicine with his brother, Dr. J. A. Landis, of Kentucky, and in September, 1869, he entered the Medical University of Nashville, Tenn.  He practiced a short time and continued to read under Dr. W. F. Clary, and in the fall of 1870 again entered the University of Nashville, and graduated in March of the following year.  Since that time he has practiced in Marshall and Bedford Counties, and since May 7, 1883, has been a resident of Unionville, and is one of the leading physicians of the place.  He attended the New York Polyclinic of Medicine and Surgery in the fall of 1885.

He was married, November 4, 1875, to Mrs. Carrie Locke, and by her became the father of five children, two of whom are dead.  Those living are Alice, Florence and Robbie.   Since eleven years of age the Doctor has been a church member, and is now a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

COUCH, Robert W. (Dr.)

DR. ROBERT W. COUCH was born March 13, 1834, in Bedford County, Tenn., and is the son of Joseph and Catherine Patton COUCH. (For further particulars of parents see sketch of R. C. COUCH.) Our subject received a practical education in the Duck River Academy at Fairfield, in this county, and his medical education at the University of Nashville, from which institution he graduated in 1855. He then began the practice of his profession, and was surgeon of the Tennessee Iron Works in Wayne County until the beginning of the late war. He then joined the Ninth Tennessee Confederate Cavalry as a lieutenant, and was afterward appointed surgeon of the regiment. He was captured at Fort Donelson and held as a prisoner until May, 1862, when he made his escape from Mound City, Ill., and walked to Corinth, Miss., and from there to his relatives in the county. Since that time he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits.

May, 1860, he married Miss Lucy TUCKER, a native of Rutherford County, and daughter of Maj. Lewis and Harriet TUCKER. To our subject and wife were born the following children: Robert, John R., Kittie, William, Lizzie and Mary, all living but John R. Mr. COUCH owns a farm of 315 cares in District No. 2, all well cultivated and in a flourishing condition. He is an Independent Democrat in politics, a Mason, and he an wife are members of the Christian Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

NEWSOM, W.R.

W. R. Newsom, M.D., physician of McLemoresville, Tenn., was born in Springfield, Robertson Co., Tenn., February 14, 1831, and is a son of Green B. and Malinda (Dickerson) Newsom, natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee. The father was born in 1796, and came to Tennessee when a young man. He was in the war of 1812 and filled the position of regimental quartermaster. He was a teacher by profession, having taught in Columbia, Franklin and Lebanon, and died in 1859, after a long and well spent life. The mother was born in 1798, and died in 1845.

Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the schools near home, but subsequently attended Andrew College, Trenton, Tenn., where he graduated in 1856. He then entered the University of Nashville, and graduated from that institution in 1859. July 7, 1859, he married Mrs. M. A. Roach, a native of Jackson, Tenn., born in 1825, and the daughter of Jones Newsom; this marriage resulted in the birth of two children: W. B. and Dr. N. D. After graduating, the Doctor located at McLemoresville and began practicing medicine, which he has followed with evident success ever since. In 1858 he was elected trustee of Bethel College and held the position until 1872, when the school was removed to McKenzie. He was also school director for many years of the public schools at McLemoresville.

Dr. Newsom is a life member of the Tennessee Historical Society, from which he holds a diploma; he is also director of the Tennessee Central Railroad. The Doctor is a Democrat in politics and cast his first presidential vote for Franklin Pierce. He is a Mason. Mrs. Newsom has one daughter, Eliza J., by her former husband, Rev. J. N. Roach, who was the founder of Bethel College, its first president, and filled that position until his death, which occurred in 1852.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

McCALL, Joseph W.

Joseph W. McCall, M.D., is a native of Henderson County, Tenn., born January 20, 1832, son of Andrew McCall, who was born in South Carolina, September 2, 1790, and is a descendant of some of the immigrants who came to the United States in the Mayflower. He was one of the early schoolmasters of Tennessee, a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church, and was an old line Whig in politics. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and in about 1830 or 1831 came to Tennessee, and located in Henderson County, where he died October 11, 1841. His wife was Jane Todd. She was born in Ireland, March 4, 1795, and was brought to America in 1798. She died in Henderson County, Tenn., in 1875.

Our subject is the ninth of ten children, six of whom are living. He was raised on a farm and attended the early schools of the county. He began the study of medicine at Clarksburg, Tenn., in the office of his brother, Dr. Henry McCall. He graduated from the medical department of the University of Nashville in 1857. In 1862 he became assistant surgeon in the United States Army for the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry. Since 1865 he has been a resident of Huntingdon, and is the oldest physician in the town; in 1869 graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in the city of New York. June 16, 1858, he married Victoria A. Wilson, who was born in Henderson County, Tenn., October 15, 1841. They have four children: Lenora J., Emma J., Fannie J. and James H. Mrs. McCall died August 24, 1884. Dr. McCall is a Republican, and for the last eighteen years has been local examining surgeon of pensions. His most important case, perhaps, was the first authenticated case in Tennessee of trichinosis. He successfully treated the family of James Espey, seven in number, in 1885.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.