SUTTON, William B.

WILLIAM B. SUTTON, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., July 12, 1834, son of John and Elizabeth (Harris) Sutton, and of English-Scotch descent.  (For further particulars of parents see sketch of Walter Finley Sutton.)  Our subject received his preparatory education at Triune, Williamson Co., Tenn., under Prof. E. B. Crocker, and completed at the Union University, Murfreesboro, Tenn.  For several years prior to the war he was engaged in the mercantile business as salesman.  When the war broke out he enlisted in the Confederate Army and was assigned duty under Maj. James F. Cummings, commissary for the Confederate Army, with headquarters at Atlanta, Ga.  Here he remained until the close of the war.

Our subject has been married twice; the first marriage occurred July 10, 1860, to Miss Kate Suttle, daughter of Richard Suttle.  To this union were born two sons:  John L., born August 1, 1865, and Ernest, born January 29, 1875.  The second marriage occurred November 17, 1885, to Miss Elizabeth Alexander.  Mr. Sutton is a thorough Democrat, an Odd Fellow, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He bas 665 acres of land, 400 of which are in a fine state of cultivation.  He gives considerable attention to the raising of live-stock.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

MONTGOMERY, T.S.

T. S. MONTGOMERY was born March 80, 1848, in the “Palmetto State.”  At the age of fifteen he left home and engaged in the dry goods business, clerking for his brother Robert S. at Palmetto.  He entered Union Academy at the end of eighteen months, where he remained about ten months.  He then returned and remained with his brother until the war.  At its close he again resumed his clerkship and at the end of two years commenced farming.  From 1868 to 1874 he was in the mercantile business at Farmington, but then returned to Palmetto, and in 1885 he and his brother sold out to their cousin.  Since 1882 he has served as magistrate of his district.

September 27, 1866, he wedded Magie L. Hagle, daughter of Peter and Esther Hagle.  They have five children: Flora Esther, T. Clarence, Ethel, Susie and HoyleMr. Montgomery is a Republican and a member of the United Presbyterian Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

COOPER, Alexander A.

ALEXANDER A. COOPER was born January 12, 1832, in Rutherford County, Tenn., son of Micajah R. and Sarah (Vincent) COOPER. The father was a native of Rowan County, N. C., born December 28, 1806. When nine years of age he moved with his parents to Cannon County, this State, and in 1829 he was married. To this union were born twelve children, our subject being the second. The father of our subject died February 16, 1874, and the mother in May, 1864.

Our subject was educated in the country schools and at Union University at Murfreesboro. After reaching his majority he followed various occupations, such as teacher, merchant and trader up to the late war, when he was appointed by the commissary-general and permanently detailed by the Secretary of War as general purchasing agent of the commissary department for the Confederate Army which position he held during the war. He then returned home and resumed merchandising at Wartrace, which he continued for two years. He then located on the farm where he now lives. He also served as deputy clerk of the county court of this county for ten years. He has held several minor offices and has been magistrate of his civil district six years.

October, 1862, he married Miss Mary E. SINGLETON, daughter of Dr. Robert L. SINGLETON, of Fairfield, now deceased. To our subject and wife were born the following children: Robert S., Henry V., Constance, Alexander A. and Sarah A., all living. Mr. COOPER is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows’ orders, and owns a farm of 100 acres near Fairfield on the Wartrace & Beech Grove Turnpike. He is a member of the board of trustees of the Duck River Academy, and takes an active part in educational matters.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

BROWN, James B.

JAMES B. BROWN is a son of Henry BROWN, a native of Wake County, N. C. The gather received a limited education, and came to Tennessee in 1833, locating in Bedford County where he engaged in farming. He was married in 1830 to Miss Sarah K. ALSTON, whose ancestors were from North Carolina. To Mr. and Mrs. BROWN were born the following family of children: Aley A., Comer N., S.L., L.S., J.J., A.S., J.B., Lucy F. and G.A. and one who died in infancy. Mr. BROWN died at this residence near Shelbyville in 1875. He was a member of the order of Sons of Temperance, and he and his wife, who died in 1873, were members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

James B., our subject, was born May 1, 1848, and spent his boyhood days on a farm. He entered the United States Military Academy at West Point when but eighteen years of age, and remained there about one year. He finished his education at the Union University at Murfreesboro, Tenn., after which he served an apprenticeship at photography, and followed that occupation three years. He then turned his attention to farming and horticulture, and his farm is known as the “Home Nursery Farm”. He was married December 15, 1875, to Sarah J. HIX, daughter of John C. and Emily HIX, and by her is the father of five children: Cora E., Abbie P., Maud M., Alice E. and Lula S., who is deceased. Mr. BROWN is a member of the Masonic and K. of H. Fraternities, and of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

BOWLING, F.M.

F. M. BOWLING, son of Joseph and Elizabeth BOWLING, was born eight miles east of Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., September 23, 1847. He resided with his parents near Bradyville, in the same county, till ten years old, then removed with them near Murfreesboro, where they are (1886) living. The first twenty years of our subject’s life were spent upon the farm, devoting his leisure time to study, and caring for his disabled father and four brothers and one sister.

In January, 1868, he entered Union University at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and remained there until June 12, 1873, receiving the degree of A.M. Previous to this he had chosen teaching as his profession, and in August, 1873, he took charge of a large school at Leeville, Tenn., and after successfully conduction it to its close he accepted a position with Prof. J. E. NOWLIN in the Masonic Institute, Hartsville, Tenn., and afterward became a partner with him in the school.

While in this school, August 26, 1874, he wedded Miss Susan E. SANDERS, daughter of Jesse B. and Mary A. Sanders, who resided near Murfreesboro. To them were born three children: Herbert Manly, born July 9, 1875; Edna Frank, born June 29, 1877, and Mary Myrtle, born May 23, 1882. Mr. BOWLING and Prof. NOWLIN dissolved partnership by mutual consent, and in January, 1876, he took charge of Unionville High School, where he is now (1886) living. He has been principal of the school ever since, with the exception of the spring term of 1881, when he was associated with Prof. B. F HOOKER, as joint-principal of Milan college, Milan, Tenn. He has devoted himself earnestly and faithful to the cause of education and has taken part in many educational enterprises in the hope of elevating his chosen profession, and has been called upon to fill prominent positions in different education institutions in the county. He follows no text-book in particular, but selects the best methods from different books. He joined the Missionary Baptist Church in the fall of 18665, and takes a deep interest in Sunday-school work, and is now superintendent of the Unionville Sunday-school, which has an average attendance of ninety-five. He is also a strong supporter of temperance.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins