ROWAN, Sam P.

Sam P. ROWAN, attorney and counselor at law, was born in Blount County, in 1838, and raised on a farm five miles east of Maryville. He was educated principally in Porter Academy and Maryville College. He read law from 1860 until 1862, when he entered the Federal Army and served as Captain in the Second Tennessee (Union) Cavalry until the spring of 1864, when, on account of bad health, he resigned. He was admitted to the bar in 1865, at Maryville, Tenn., and has practiced his profession there ever since. He was a member of the Legislature of 1885-86 as senator from the Sixth Senatorial District.

His ancestry is of the old Scotch-Irish stock which first settled in Virginia, the Carolinas and Tennessee. His two grandfathers, George BERRY and Samuel ROWAN, came from Virginia, the former about the year 1792, and the latter a few years after. They both died in Blount County.

Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

McTEER, William A. (Major)

Maj. William A. McTEER, a prominent attorney of Maryville, was born in Blount County, September 16, 1843. The great-grandfather, ROBERT McTEER, came from Ireland, and located first in Mifflin County, Pa., but about 1780 came to Blount County. He served through the Revolution, and died in the eastern part of Blount County, about 1824. WILLIAM, the grandfather, was born June 14, 1780, in Blount County, served in the war of 1812, and died May 29, 1862. ANDREW B., the father, was born in Blount County, September 5, 1820. He was a farmer, and blacksmith, and was quartermaster in the Third Tennessee (Federal) Cavalry, and also adjutant, Major and Colonel in the State militia. He died June 14, 1885. The mother, NANCY (GAMBLE), a native of Blount County, still lives on the old homestead, originally consisting of 600 acres, entered by ROBERT McTEER, art of which was entered from the North Carolina government.

Our subject has many family relics in his possession, including a watch of English make, held by the family since 1750 and carried through the Revolution by ROBERT McTEER. WILLIAM A. was reared on a farm, was in a country store, and also learned the blacksmith’s trade. He was the first of his regiment, the Third Tennessee (Federal) Cavalry, sworn in, enlisting in Company A. He was made Second Lieutenant, then adjutant, and at the close held a Major’s commission. He also served on the staff of COLS. THORNBURG and PROSSER. After the war he attended Maryville College until 1867, and a year later was made clerk of the circuit court, in which capacity he served from 1868 to 1878, when he was admitted to the bar. He served in the Legislature in 1881-82. He is a director of the Bank of Maryville; is a director and also treasurer of Maryville College. Since 1878 he has been United States commissioner.

In 1876 he married MARY T. WILSON, daughter of REV. D. M. WILSON, a Presbyterian minister, now of Spring City, Rhea County, Tenn. She was born in Beyroot, Syria. Our subject is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and for several years has been superintendent of the New Providence Sabbath-school. He was president of the East Tennessee Sabbath-school Convention in 1886-87, and is vice-president, for East Tennessee, of the Tennessee State Temperance Alliance.

Source:  Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

HENRY, H.W. (Capt.)

Capt. W. H. HENRY was born in Blount County, in 1841, and reared on a farm until about fifteen years old. He then attended and graduated from Maryville College, and afterward studied law at Macon, Ga., a short time. September 20, 1862, he enlisted in John P. McCOWAN’s body guard, and after McCOWAN’s arrest and trial by BRAGG at Murfreesboro, became attached to the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, Company L, of which he was made Second Lieutenant, after the fall of Capt. J. J. PARTON at Chickamauga, and afterward made captain.

In August, 1864, he became paralyzed from exposure, retired for active service, but was still with his company at the surrender, in North Carolina. He returned home and farmed one year, and then taught school two or three years, but afterward resumed farming. In 1875-76 he was superintendent of public instruction in Blount County, and elected justice of the peace, in 1882, by a large majority, his district being largely Republican, and he a Democrat. His home is in Maryville, but his farm of 140 acres is one mile and a half from Maryville.

In 1866 he married Martha E., daughter of ex-Senator David W. TEDFORD. Of two sons and four daughters, one of the former and two of the latter are living, and the entire family are members of the Presbyterian Church. Samuel HENRY, the great-grandfather, was born in Virginia, and built the first grist-mill south of Maryville in this county. In connection with his milling he farmed a 640 acres entry on Little Baker Creek, and donated sixteen acres now occupied by the Baker Creek Presbyterian Church, and on which he was afterward buried. The grandfather, William W., was a farmer, and lived in East Tennessee until the war, when he moved to Bell County, Tex., and died in 1864. The father, James M., also born and reared in Blount County, followed school teaching in his younger days. In 1839 he married Ann HUTTON. He followed farming, and also teaming to and from Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina, before the days of railroads. He died in 1875. He was sheriff of Blount County from 1848 to 1854, and was justice at the time of his death. He was Captain of Company L, Second Tennessee Federal Cavalry, after Burnside entered East Tennessee in 1863, until the close of the war. The mother died in 1882.

Our subject and his brother, J. N., residents of the old home-place, which has never passed out of the family’s hands, are the survivors of six children, of whom four were sisters. The captain is the eldest, and for twenty-three years has been a great sufferer, at times, from hemiplegia, or paralysis, of the left side. Our subject and his father differed upon the questions involved in the war, and each showed his faith by his works, and yet the father’s house was always the home of the son. A remarkable coincidence is that at the close of the war each one commanded Company L in his respective regiment, not having heard from the other for two years.

Source:  Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

BARTLETT, P.M.

P. M. BARTLETT, President of the Maryville College and Bank of Maryville, was born in Connecticut in 1820, and graduated at Williams College, Massachusetts, in 1850, and at Union Theological Seminary, New York City, in 1853. He then at once began the ministry in Ohio, acting as agent for the American Tract Society, four years, after which, he returned to New York State and continued preaching until the commencement of the late war, and then served as chaplain of the First New York Mounted Infantry, two years. He then went to Massachusetts, and soon after located in Connecticut, where he remained until 1869, when he accepted the presidency of Maryville College. The ancestors of our subject came from England to Plymouth, Mass., in 1623. The parents, Isaiah and Mariam (MASON) BARTLETT, were natives of Massachusetts and Connecticut, were married in Ohio, and followed farming until their respective deaths in 1867 and 1869. Our subject, three brothers, and two sisters are the survivors of a family of nine children. Mrs. BARTLETT, nee Miss Florence M. ALDEN, is a direct descendant of John Alden, of “Mayflower” fame, and a granddaughter of Gov. Lumpkin , of Georgia. She is a graduate of Yale, and a highly accomplished lady.

Source:  Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

ALEXANDER, J.H.

J. H. ALEXANDER, M. D., was born in Blount (now Loudon) County, October 16, 1845, the son of Francis and Margaret A. (Vickers) ALEXANDER, the former born near Leesburg, Tenn., in 1809, the son of Francis ALEXANDER, a native of Buncombe County, N.C., and who married Jane O’DAIR, and became a pioneer of Washington County. He was a farmer, and, with his wife, belonged to the Presbyterian Church. The father, a farmer and blacksmith, moved to Blount County when twenty-one and died in 1870. The mother, born in the latter county in 1830, was the daughter of James VICKERS. Both parents were Presbyterians, and had ten children.

Our subject, the fifth attended the Quaker school at Friendsville, and then entered Maryville College for three years, when he began medicine with Dr. BLANKENSHIP at the latter place. During 1870, 1871, and 1872 he attended the medical department of the University of Louisville, graduating in 1872 He practiced in Blount County until September 1872, and then in Elizabethton until the fall of 1879. He entered Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia and graduated in 1880, resuming his practice at Elizabethton where he has succeeded remarkably.

In 1868 he married Sallie M., the daughter of William T. DOWELL a Methodist minister. She died in 1869, and May 7, 1873; Senorita V., a daughter of H. H. LUTZ, became his wife. She was born in Virginia November 6, 1851. Their children are an infant son, born January 31, 1874, and deceased February 2, 1874, Henry F., born December 7, 1874; Maggie, born April 3, 1877, Edwin C., born February 3, 1879; Sarah, born September 5, 1881, and deceased September 5, 1883; and Nannie, born October 30, 1888, and deceased June 23, 1886. He and his wife are Methodists.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.