TOWNES, Henry C.

Hon. Henry C, Townes, attorney at law, and native of Carroll County, Tenn., was born June 10, 1840, son of Col. James and Julia B. (Clark) Townes, and is of Welsh-English lineage. His father was born in Virginia in 1788 and his mother in North Carolina, 1795. The Townes family came to Tennessee about 1828 and here James Townes died in 1858, and his wife in 1870. The Clark family located in the county about the same time. They were among the early settlers.

Our subject is the youngest of seven children and was educated at Huntingdon Male Academy and at Hamden Sidney College in Virginia, where he was attending school at the breaking out of the war. He enlisted in the Hamden City Company Twentieth Virginia, Confederate States Army, and was captured at the battle of Rich Mountain. He was subsequently exchanged and then joined the Third Virginia Cavalry and with this continued until the close of the war. He was in many important battles and in 1865 came home and began the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1867, and from that time until the present has been engaged in practicing his profession, with Albert G. Hawkins as his partner since 1874.

He is a Democrat and was married in December, 1868, to Alice Crockett of Carroll County. She was born in 1847. They have five children: Eva, Charlie M., Cora, Lida and Herbert C. Mr. Townes is a K. of H., and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Townes was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago in 1884, and is now a member of the Senate of Tennessee, having been elected in November last to that position.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

HAWKINS, Samuel W.

Capt. Samuel W. Hawkins, attorney at law, was born in the town of Huntingdon, Carroll Co., Tenn., January 6, 1844. His father was Hon. Isaac R. Hawkins, born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1818, and was a son of Samuel Hawkins, a native of Bath County, Ky., born about 1793. His wife was Nancy Roberts, daughter of Gen. Roberts, extensively known in Tennessee history, The father of our subject came to Carroll County in 1828. He was by profession a lawyer, and in politics was formerly a Whig. He was a Union man during the war, and since that conflict, to the time of his death in 1880, has been a leading Republican. He was a Mexican soldier. In the Rebellion he was colonel of the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry. He was a member of the Peace Congress, which sat at the city of Washington in 1860. The same year he was elected circuit judge of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, but on account of the war did not accept the office. In 1860 he was elected to represent the Eighth Congressional District in Congress, and was re-elected to the same office in 1865 and in 1867. He was the man, perhaps, above all others, that saved the State of Tennessee from reconstruction. He was a profound lawyer, an eminent statesman, a true and brave soldier, and one of the early settlers and benefactors of Carroll County. An omission of his name would leave the history of Carroll County incomplete. The mother of Capt. Hawkins was Ellen A. Hawkins, whose maiden name was Ott, a native of Rutherford County, Tenn., born in 1822, and died in Carroll County in 1884.

Our subject is the oldest of three children, two surviving. He attended school at Huntingdon Male Academy. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, United States Army. The same year he was commissioned second lieutenant. He afterward raised Company I, of the same regiment, and was mustered in as first lieutenant and later commissioned captain. He was taken prisoner in 1865, and held as a prisoner of war for some time. During a portion of 1863 he was with the Eighty-eighth Ohio, and later had charge of the Third Infantry. He was a true and brave soldier, and was discharged at Nashville in 1865, and the same year began the study of law under the direction of his father in Huntingdon. Since then he has been engaged in the practice of his profession, practicing in the courts of Carroll and surrounding counties. He is without question one of the best informed men of this section. Politically, he is a Republican, and for many years has been prominently identified with the interests of that party. He was married in 1867 to Miss Hester B. Gardner, a native of Humphreys County, born in 1847. They have three children, viz.: Hugh R., William W. and Isaac G. Mr. and Mrs Hawkins are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a leading citizen and an active man.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

HAWKINS, Albert G.

Hon. Albert G. Hawkins, judge of the Ninth Chancery District, was born near Huntingdon, Carroll Co., Tenn., April 24, 1841. (For early history of the family see sketch of Alvin Hawkins, a former governor of Tennessee.) He was reared to man’s estate on a farm and was educated in the early country schools and at Huntingdon Male Academy. In January, 1861, he went to Shreveport, La., and for five months was engaged in teaching school. After his return to his native county he enlisted in Capt. Briant’s company, Fifty-fifth Tennessee, Confederate States Army Infantry, and served until 1862, when he came home on account of illness. Recovering, he joined Forrest’s cavalry and in that capacity served until the close of the war. He was wounded at Brice’s Cross-roads in 1864 and surrendered at Gainesville, Ala., May 11, 1865.

He began studying law in 1861 and resumed it in 1865. He was admitted to the bar in 1866 and since then has been engaged in the practice of his profession, and is one of the able lawyers of West Tennessee. In politics he is a Democrat. In 1876 he was elected to represent the counties of Carroll and Gibson in the Tennessee Senate. In 1880 he was the Democratic elector for the Eighth Congressional District, and in August, 1886, was elected chancellor of the Ninth Chancery Division. He is one of the popular men of West Tennessee and is a Mason and K. of H. In 1869 he married Ellen Prince, of Carroll County, born in 1849. They have three children: Prince A., Clarence M. and Leslie O. Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.