BOND, Frank P.

Frank P. BOND, attorney at law of Brownsville, Tenn., was born in Bertie County, N.C., June 27, 1851, son of Lewis T. and Penelope (PUGH) Bond, natives of the same State and county. The father removed to Haywood County in 1866, and followed agricultural pursuits here until his death, being one of the successful planters of the county. He died in 1870.

Our subject was educated in the university of Virginia, and studied law at Cumberland University, of Lebanon, Tenn., graduating in 1872. He was admitted to the bar at Brownsville the same year, and has been engaged regularly in the practice ever since, having met with good and well deserved success. Mr. Bond is an unswerving Democrat in politics, and has figured prominently in the political affairs of his county and district. In 1882 he was the Democratic nominee for State senator, but was defeated, owing to the hopeless minority of the party in the district, running, however, about 1,000 votes ahead of the ticket. He was a delegate to the national convention of 1884 that nominated President Cleveland, and was a candidate for nomination to represent his district in the United States Congress in 1886.

On August 2, 1877, he married Miss Mildred BOND, a daughter of James Bond. The two living children: Minnie and Irene. Mr. Bond is recognized as an enterprising and reliable citizen and legal practitioner.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

CROSS, George W.

George W. CROSS, a prominent lawyer of Manchester, Tenn., was born in Anderson County August 31, 1849. He is the son of William and Jane (Black) CROSS, both of English descent and natives of Anderson County. The former, born in 1810, is still living; the latter, born about 1820, died February 26, 1885. Married in 1836 the elder CROSS engaged in farming. He is a Democrat, and sympathizes with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of which his wife was a member.

Our subject, the fifth of eight children, was educated chiefly at Cumberland University,at Lebanon, Tenn., and the military school of Knoxville, Tenn., from which he graduated in September, 1874. After three years’ teaching in Decherd and Salem, Tenn., in September, 1877, he took ten months at Vanderbilt University Law Department, and the professor granted him license to practice. Since 1878,when he came to Manchester, he has become one of the most successful lawyers of Coffee County and among the ablest in this section. January 17, 1882, he married Beulah HICKERSON, born in 1861, the daughter of Judge W.P. HICKERSON. She was a cultured lady. Her death occurred July 24,1885. Mr. CROSS is a decided Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

THOMPSON, Zach

ZACH THOMPSON was born July 7, 1844, at Lebanon, Wilson Co., Tenn.  His father, Col. Robert E. Thompson, is a native of Bedford County, Tenn., born in 1822 and of Irish descent.  He moved to Williamson County with his parents when a small boy and subsequently was educated at Lebanon, Wilson County, and began the practice of law at that place.  He bas been a member of the Legislature several times and is a prominent lawyer of Lebanon.

He married Miss Mary Tolliver, a native of Lebanon, and to this union nine children were born, of whom the subject is the eldest.  Zach Thompson was educated at Cumberland University, Lebanon, and upon passing sixteen years of age he enlisted in the Seventh Tennessee Confederate Infantry.  He served in that regiment about eighteen months and was then transferred to the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry and with that command served until the close of the war.  He then returned home and read law and practiced at Lebanon until 1873.

November 21, 1872, Miss Lettie Cannon, a native of Bedford County, became his wife.  To this Union were born two children:  Robert E., and Mary L., both living.  In 1873 they moved upon the place where they now reside, which is about six miles northeast of Shelbyville.  The farm consists of 820 acres, all under a good state of cultivation.  In connection with farming Mr. Thompson has run a distillery for the last three years.  In politics he is a stanch Democrat.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

MOODY, Clement J.

CLEMENT J. MOODY, one of Bedford County’s prominent attorneys is a son of Samuel S. and Letitia (Cannon) Moody.  The father was born in Henry County, Tenn.  He was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and was a member of the general conference of 1844, when the churches divided and he adhered to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He was one of the most eminent ministers of the church and for many years was presiding elder of this district conference.  He held very prominent positions in various places.  His death occurred May 7, 1868.  The mother was a niece of Gov. Newton Cannon, and her father was one of the most prominent pioneers of this county, and gave the land whereon the town of Shelbyville was built.  She died July 24, 1880.

The subject of this sketch received a good early education, graduating at the Centre College, Kentucky, in 1865.  He then read law in Shelbyville and in 1867 graduated in the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn.  He was then admitted to the Bedford County bar and has been justly successful in the profession, ranking among the leading criminal lawyers of the State.  He was married January 18, 1881, to Miss Sally C. M. Cannon, daughter of John T. Cannon, whose sketch appears in this work.  Mr. Moody and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Moody is a Royal Arch Mason and Past Grand Master of the Shelbyville Lodge.  Politically he is a firm Democrat, and is one of the leading spirits in his party.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

HOLT, John W.

JOHN W. HOLT was born February 22, 1855, in Bedford County, Tenn.; son of B. D. and Lucretia (Hart) Holt, natives also of this county.  The father is one of the prominent farmers of the county.  The mother died in 1863.  Our subject was educated at the Wartrace High School, and lived with and assisted his father on the farm until he was about seventeen years of age.  He then took a course in the telegraphing department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn.

In 1875 he took charge of the telegraph office at McEwen, Tenn., and remained there seven months.  He was then assigned the office at Johnsonville, which he declined, and in 1877 took charge of the office at Christiana and remained there three years.  He then took charge of the agency of the railroad and telegraph office at McMinnville, where he remained but a short time.  He then went to Nashville and entered the general bookkeeping office, where he remained eight months.  He then took charge of the Western Union telegraph office at Bowling Green, Ky.; in five months he left, and in 1880 took charge of the ticket, telegraph and Southern Express office at Wartrace, where he now resides.

In 1882 he married Miss Blanch Halbach, a native of Virginia, and this union was blessed by two children:  Cecil R. and Herbert F.  Our subject is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

CLEVELAND, Thomas S.

THOMAS S. CLEVELAND was born April 25, 1840, in Bedford County, Tenn. His father Jeremiah CLEVELAND was a native of Greenville, S. C., born March, 1806, and of English and German descent. About 1833 he immigrated to Bedford County, Tenn., and located on the farm where our subject is now living. He married Miss Sallie E. STONE, and native of Maury County, born about 1815, and of English descent. To this union were born six children. Jeremiah CLEVELAND was a merchant before his coming to this State and a farmer afterward. He owned about 1,500 acres of land on Duck River, on this county, besides a large tract of 3,000 acres on the Mississippi River. He had about $50,000 of stock in the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and was one of the first board of directors to locate the road. He died in 1878. The mother of our subject died in 1840.

Thomas CLEVELAND was educated at the Cumberland University at Lebanon, and lived with his father until May, 1861, when he enlisted in company G, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, and was elected as third Lieutenant of his company, and as such served twelve months. He then joined the artillery of Gen. John H. Morgan’s command, and was captured in Ohio in July, 1863, and retained until 1863. He then returned to Wartrace, Bedford County, where he has ever since remained engaged in farming. In 1867 he married Miss Annie E. WRIGHT, a native of Floyd County, Ga., and a daughter of Moses R. WRIGHT, and a niece of Judge WRIGHT. Who was a member of the United Stated congress.

To our subject and wife were born five children: Sallie S., Lizzie H., Hattie D., Annie L:. and Carrie C. Mr. CLEVELAND is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also of the R. A. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and live on the old homestead, consisting of 600 acres of land. Mr. CLEVELAND is a grandson of Capt. Robert CLEVELAND, and a grandnephew of Col. Benjamin CLEVELAND, both of whom served with distinction in the Revolutionary War.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

DICKENS–J.L.

J. L. Dickens, A. M., B. D., was born March 3, 1853, in Gibson County, Tenn., and is of a family of seven children born to Robert G. and Mary M. (Dickey) Dickens, of which our subject and two sisters are surviving members. The father was born in North Carolina and moved to Gibson County, Tenn., when thirteen years of age; that is also the native county of his wife, and they were married there in 1846, farming until 1862, when they moved to Marion County, Ill., continuing farming until the father’s death, December 27, 1864. The mother then returned to Gibson County with the children, and afterward married G. W. Dickey, and they are at present residing on a farm in Dyer County.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was nineteen years of age, then attended Newbern Seminary two years, acquiring the necessary means by the assistance of friends, added to his own industry and economy. He was then licensed to preach in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in 1876 was ordained to the ministry. He did mission labor until November, 1874, then entered Bethel College, which he attended until he graduated in the classical course, in 1879, then he continued in the ministry in Tennessee until November 1880, accepting at that date a call to become pastor of the Cumnberland Presbyterian Church at Fayetteville, Ark., which he filled until the spring of 1882, then he responded to a call from a church at Biggsville, Ill., which terminated abruptly, owing to throat disease that caused him much trouble.

In September, 1882, he entered Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, and remained two years, then entered the theological department of Cumberland University, graduating June, 1884, with the degree of B. D., and accepted the position of professor of belles lettres and moral and mental science in Bethel College, McKenzie, Tenn., of which he was elected president June 1, 1886. August 21, 1879, he married Miss Mattie J. Tiner, of Gibson County. Her parents, J. A. and Mary J. Tiner, are still residing in Gibson County. Mr. and Mrs. Dickens are Cumberland Presbyterians, and he is a member of the F. and A. M.


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

CUMINGS, J.H. (Hon.)

Hon. J. H. Cumings, of Woodbury, attorney at law, is a native of Warren County, Tenn. and was born in 1839. His parents were Warren and Orlend Cumings, both natives of Warren County, the former having been born in 1814, is a farmer by occupation and held the office of sheriff of Cannon County six years. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1870, and now resides at Woodbury, Tenn.

The subject of this sketch received his literary education at Woodbury, and in 1872 began the study of the law with T.B. Murry of McMinnville, Tenn, and afterward attended the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon,Tenn. He was admitted to the bar in 1873 and has since been engaged in the practice of the law at Woodbury. In November 1885, he was elected to the legislature. He enjoys an extensive and lucrative practice, and in politics he is an ardent Democrat. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Eighteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Infantry, under Capt. H.J. St. John. He was with the company three years and engaged in some of the heavy battles of war. During the last year of the war he was with the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, commanded by Col. Baxter Smith of Nashville. H. A. Wiley of Woodville was his captain. He participated in numerous engagements, was captured once but soon paroled, and returned home in 1865.


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.