WEIR, F.H.

F. H. WEIR, an enterprising farmer of the Sixth District of Chester County, was born in Madison County, August 20, 1834, and is one of a family of eight children. His parents, S. L. and Mary WEIR, were both born in Blount County, Tenn., the father in 1793 and the mother in 1800. They came to Madison County in 1830, where he was engaged in farming until his death, in 1854. The mother died in 1834.

Our subject was reared at home and received his education at the district schools and at Bethel College. In 1858 he married Rittie CAIN, a native of Madison County, born in 1834, and the daughter of Andrew and Sarah CAIN. They have an interesting family of children. Mr. WEIR is an active energetic man and has followed agricultural pursuits the principal part of his life. In 1888 he was elected deputy sheriff, and filled that office with credit. occupying that position for about six years, to the satisfaction of all concerned. He was also elected magistrate when Chester County was organized. In the fall of 1881 he entered the Confederate Army, joining an independent company of scouts under Gen. FORREST. He served through the principal part of the war and was a brave and gallant soldier.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

TROUTT, J.M.

J. M. TROUTT, leading attorney of Henderson, Tenn., is a native Kentuckian, born in Marshall County, April 8, 1848; son of William and Isabella (Watkins) TROUTT, both natives of Marshall County, Tenn. The father was born about 1804, and moved to Kentucky about 1840. He served for many years both as constable and deputy sheriff. He was also engaged in agricultural pursuits in which he was quite successful. He died about 1857. The mother was born about the same year as her husband and is now living with her son, Dr. J. R. TROUTT, at Clear Springs, Ky. Our subject was educated at the McKenzie College, and also at Bethel Co1lege but subsequently attended Princeton College, Kentucky. In 1871 and 1872 Mr. Troutt read law under Judge McCAMPBELL of Paris, and was admitted to the bar about 1874; after which he practiced at Dresden until 1880. He then came to Henderson where he has since remained. He is an able practitioner and has built up an extensive practice. He was one of the leaders in organizing Chester County after the act was passed setting it aside as an independent county.

In 1874 Mr. TROUTT married Emma TRAVIS, a native of Henry County, Tenn., born in 1850, and the daughter of Dr. Joseph TRAVIS. She died in 1876. December, 1877, he married R. PROVINCE, a native of McKenzie, Tenn., born in 1852 and the daughter of Andrew and Mary PROVINCE. To this union was born one child, James McCord, Mr. TROUTT is a Democrat in politics, an excellent citizen and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. TROUTT is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1804 he enlisted in Company G, Third Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Confederate Army, and participated in many important battles. He was captured at Selma, Ala,, paroled at Montgomery and returned home in 1865.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

EDWARDS, John B.

John B. EDWARDS, a well known farmer of the Fifth District of Chester County, was born in Henderson County in 1840, the fourth child of a family of six children born to Samuel T. and Charlotte (Robertson) EDWARDS. The father was of Welsh descent; born in North Carolina in 1809, he came with his mother in 1830 to Henderson County, where he lived at the time of his marriage; he settled in the Third District, the portion now called Sixth District of Chester County. He lived there until the time of his death, which occurred in 1844. His wife was also of North Carolina, born in 1812, and died in 1870.

The subject of this sketch received his education at the schools in Mifflin, Lexington, Bethel College and McLemoresville where he attended for four years; he remained at home with his mother until he was about sixteen years of age. In 1856 he accepted a position as salesman in a general store at Mifflin, where he worked over four years, or until hostilities broke out between the North and South. In May, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate service, Company I, Thirteenth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry. He took active part in the engagements at Belmont, Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville, also in numerous skirmishes. At the battle of Belmont he was captured and held as prisoner of war, but only for a short length of time. He remained in service until the surrender, was with Gen. FORREST the last six weeks; he returned home April, 1865, after four years of duty.

February, 1865, he married Miss C. A. BUCKLEY, of Henderson County, born in 1844, a daughter of John BUCKLEY. To their union six children have been born: Lizzie, Carl, Hubert, Annettie, Helen and an infant son. In 1866 Mr. Edwards established a general store at Princeton, Madison County. In 1868 he abandoned mercantile pursuits and returned to his native county and began farming. In 1875 he bought 222 acres of land in the Third District, now the Fifth District of Chester County, where he settled and now resides.

For the past three years he has also owned an interest in a general store in Muffin, the company being known as Wheeler, Edwards & Co. Mr. EDWARDS is quite an extensive land holder, all the land being under fine cultivation and improved with buildings. He is a man of great energy, ability and honor; has met with unusual success, and has the respect of the entire community. He is a stanch Democrat, cast his first vote for Jefferson Davis in 1864.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

THOMAS, Haywood B.

Haywood B. Thomas, a farmer by occupation, was born in Carroll County, September 10, 1832, and is of a family of five sons and eight daughters, born to Luke and Elizabeth (Burradelle) Thomas, himself and four sisters being the surviving members of the family. Both parents were born in Burke County, N.C., and moved to Trigg County, Ky., when young, and were married there; moved to Carroll County, Tenn., in 1825, and remained there farming until his father’s death in 1862. His father was an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church for many years. His mother remained in the county until her death in 1870.

Our subject, Haywood B. Thomas, attended Bethel College a few terms after his majority, then taught school one year in Carroll County, after which he was engaged in the marble trade until 1858, in the interest of a firm in Hickman, Ky. He was then employed in the construction of the Northwestern Railroad until 1862, when he enlisted in the Fifth Tennessee Confederate Infantry, remaining a year, and was then transferred to the Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry as first lieutenant, and held this position until Capt. Falkner’s death at Dresden, when he returned home, and remained until he married, November 7, 1867, Miss Ann Roach, the issue of this union being four sons and five daughters, all living but one son. After the war, he purchased a farm in Carroll County, which he still owns, but in June, 1885, he moved to McKenzie. On his farm, which contains 250 acres, are Indian mounds, and a number of fine springs of freestone water. Mr. Thomas is an extensive cotton grower, paying but little attention to the cultivation of the cereals. He and family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he is an elder. He is also a member of the board of aldermen of McKenzie and board of trustees of Bethel College, and vice-president of the State Agricultural Wheel, and president of the Carroll County Agricultural Wheel.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

NEWSOM, W.R.

W. R. Newsom, M.D., physician of McLemoresville, Tenn., was born in Springfield, Robertson Co., Tenn., February 14, 1831, and is a son of Green B. and Malinda (Dickerson) Newsom, natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee. The father was born in 1796, and came to Tennessee when a young man. He was in the war of 1812 and filled the position of regimental quartermaster. He was a teacher by profession, having taught in Columbia, Franklin and Lebanon, and died in 1859, after a long and well spent life. The mother was born in 1798, and died in 1845.

Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the schools near home, but subsequently attended Andrew College, Trenton, Tenn., where he graduated in 1856. He then entered the University of Nashville, and graduated from that institution in 1859. July 7, 1859, he married Mrs. M. A. Roach, a native of Jackson, Tenn., born in 1825, and the daughter of Jones Newsom; this marriage resulted in the birth of two children: W. B. and Dr. N. D. After graduating, the Doctor located at McLemoresville and began practicing medicine, which he has followed with evident success ever since. In 1858 he was elected trustee of Bethel College and held the position until 1872, when the school was removed to McKenzie. He was also school director for many years of the public schools at McLemoresville.

Dr. Newsom is a life member of the Tennessee Historical Society, from which he holds a diploma; he is also director of the Tennessee Central Railroad. The Doctor is a Democrat in politics and cast his first presidential vote for Franklin Pierce. He is a Mason. Mrs. Newsom has one daughter, Eliza J., by her former husband, Rev. J. N. Roach, who was the founder of Bethel College, its first president, and filled that position until his death, which occurred in 1852.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

McCALL, George T.

George T. McCall, a leading member of the Huntingdon bar, was born at Clarksburg, Carroll Co., Tenn., October 21, 1854, son of Dr. Henry and Frances (Bowlin) McCall, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. His father was born in South Carolina in 1817, and his mother, who was a Virginian, was born in 1827. Dr. McCall came to Carroll County about 1845, and for thirty-seven years was a successful physician of the county. He died May 2, 1880.

George T. McCall is the third of their eight children, and was educated at Bethel College and McNairy Institute. He began his legal studies in 1876 in the office of Judge L. L. Hawkins, and July 4, 1877, was admitted to the Carroll County bar. Since then he has been engaged in the practice of his profession. He is an ardent Republican, and in 1880 was elected mayor of Huntingdon, and was re-elected. in 1886, and also in 1887. As a lawyer he has been prominent and successful, and as a citizen is well known and esteemed.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

DICKENS–J.L.

J. L. Dickens, A. M., B. D., was born March 3, 1853, in Gibson County, Tenn., and is of a family of seven children born to Robert G. and Mary M. (Dickey) Dickens, of which our subject and two sisters are surviving members. The father was born in North Carolina and moved to Gibson County, Tenn., when thirteen years of age; that is also the native county of his wife, and they were married there in 1846, farming until 1862, when they moved to Marion County, Ill., continuing farming until the father’s death, December 27, 1864. The mother then returned to Gibson County with the children, and afterward married G. W. Dickey, and they are at present residing on a farm in Dyer County.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was nineteen years of age, then attended Newbern Seminary two years, acquiring the necessary means by the assistance of friends, added to his own industry and economy. He was then licensed to preach in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in 1876 was ordained to the ministry. He did mission labor until November, 1874, then entered Bethel College, which he attended until he graduated in the classical course, in 1879, then he continued in the ministry in Tennessee until November 1880, accepting at that date a call to become pastor of the Cumnberland Presbyterian Church at Fayetteville, Ark., which he filled until the spring of 1882, then he responded to a call from a church at Biggsville, Ill., which terminated abruptly, owing to throat disease that caused him much trouble.

In September, 1882, he entered Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, and remained two years, then entered the theological department of Cumberland University, graduating June, 1884, with the degree of B. D., and accepted the position of professor of belles lettres and moral and mental science in Bethel College, McKenzie, Tenn., of which he was elected president June 1, 1886. August 21, 1879, he married Miss Mattie J. Tiner, of Gibson County. Her parents, J. A. and Mary J. Tiner, are still residing in Gibson County. Mr. and Mrs. Dickens are Cumberland Presbyterians, and he is a member of the F. and A. M.


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

COOPER, A.E.

Rev. A. E. Cooper was born in Halifax County, N.C., October 12, 1803, and was one of seven children, two now living, of Isles and Nancy-(Edwards) Cooper. The former was of Scotch origin, born in 1767, and reared his family in Halifax County, N.C. He died about 1812. The mother was born in North Carolina, and was a few years younger than her husband.

Our subject was taken to South Carolina when a small boy and was educated in the common schools of the Palmetto State. In December, 1839, he married Mary H., daughter of Hon. Robert Clendening of York District, South Carolina. Mrs. Cooper was born near Yorksville, S.C., December 11, 1811, and has the following living children: S. C., a farmer living in Henry County, Tenn. ; William F., a professor of music and a resident of McLemoresville; Mary A. (Mrs. J. J. Wingo); Martha L. (Mrs. William Fuqua); Robert A., a farmer residing near McLemoresville; Eliza A. (wife of George Ferrell, who is a lawyer by profession and is now editor of the Humboldt Weekly Messenger). In 1830 Mr. Cooper located at McLemoresville, where he has since resided. Mr. Cooper began his ministerial labors in 1846 and has since been actively engaged in preaching the doctrines of the Cumberland. Presbyterian Church. He assisted in establishing Bethel College and was president of the board of trustees when the school was organized, and with the exception of a short time has since held the position. About 1870 the college was moved to McKinzie, and about one and a half years Mr. Cooper devoted his time and interest to the endowment fund of the college, the same being raised to nearly $50,000. He has always been an energetic worker, and although eighty-three years of age, preaches at three regular appointments.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

BRAMLEY, J.H.

J. H. Bramley, a merchant of McLemoresville, Tenn., was born in Carroll County of that State, in 1858, and is one of a family of seven children born to J. P. and S. D. (Smith) Bramley, both natives of Tennessee, and both born in 1831. The father was educated in Bethel College, and came to this county about 1852. He is now a resident of this county, living in the Twentieth District. The mother was also educated at Bethel College.

Our subject was reared at home, and received his education mostly at Trezevant. In 1880 he married S. A. McKinney, a native of Tennessee, born in 1856, and the daughter of Ralph and Mary McKinney. This union resulted in the birth of one son, Dossie P. Until 1882 Mr. Bramley was engaged in tilling the soil; he then went to McLemoresville and engaged in merchandising, which occupation he still follows. He keeps a general stock of groceries, hardware and drugs, and has a good and increasing trade. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.