DANCY, John H.

John H. DANCY residing in the Second District of Haywood County, was born in October, 1831, in Williamson County, and is the son of Isaac Dancy, who was born August 7, 1783, in Virginia, but moved at an early date to Tennessee, locating at Spring Hill, and was captain of a militia company of Williamson and Maury Counties. He moved to Haywood County in 1831, and located on the farm where our subject now lives, and established a post office called Dancy, that was moved in 1841 to Dancyville, still retaining the name. The first Methodist Church in this part of Tennessee, was built about 200 yards from his dwelling, and was used as a schoolhouse.

John Dancy’s mother’s maiden named was Mary LAMB; she was born in Virginia, July 19, 1793, and died September 6, 1859. Our subject remained on the farm until his father’s death, in August 1863. February 27, 1856, he married Louisa KERR, daughter of Francis B. and Ann R. Kerr; the father was born February 27, 1801, in South Carolina, and died in Fayette County in 1885; her mother was born in Sumner County, and died August 30, 1873. Mrs. Dancy was born November 5, 1834, and they have ten children: John William, Mary F. (Wife of V. M. PATTON), Ella (wife of Absalom RUDD), Albert S., Alexander, Isaac Bradley, Lula, Lillie B., Emma R. and James H.

Mr. Dancy is worth about $7,000 which he as accumulated since the war. With his wife he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South; his educational advantages were limited when he was young, but he has always manifested a warm interest in the schools of the county. He is now a Democrat, but before the was an old-line Whig.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BAIN, Sam C.D. (Dr.)

Dr. Sam. C. D. BAIN, farmer and physician of the Tenth District, was born in Sumner County, February 14, 1831, and was one of ten children born to John R. and Sarah E. Bain. The father was born in North Carolina in 1793, and moved with his parents to Tennessee when a child. They located first in East Tennessee, then moved to Sumner County. He was a Presbyterian minister, and also engaged in teaching; he died in 1868. His mother’s maiden name was CROCKETT. She was a distant relative of David Crockett, and was born in Williamson County in 1801, and died in 1878.

Dr. Bain was educated at the Nashville University, and remained in that city until the close of the war. In 1851 he commenced reading medicine under Drs. Watson and Briggs, at the same time attending lectures at the medical university, and graduated in 1854, and the same year married Miss Delphine HALL, who was born in Giles County in 1836, and died in 1877. The had two children: J. Watson and Josie (wife of Baldwin LUCAS).

Dr. Bain moved to Haywood County in 1857, and located where he now lives; he has had an extensive practice, and also engaged in farming, owning 640 acres of good land. In 1878 he married Miss Emma GRIFFIN, daughter of A. J. and Lean Griffin. Mrs. Bain was a native of Mississippi. Hugh, ages seven years; Ethel, aged five years; Emma May, aged three years, and Maunsel, aged about three months, are the children blessing their union. Dr. Bain is a Democrat and a Mason.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BAUCOM, J.F.

J. F. BAUCOM, citizen and farmer of the Tenth District, was worn in Maury County, Tenn., August 30, 1826, being one of six children born to Brittain and Elizabeth Baucom. The father was of English origin, born in Rockingham County, N. C., in 1796, and moved to Tennessee in 1814, locating in East Tennessee, but two years later moved to Maury County, and in 1829 to Illinois, where he engaged in farming and died in 1831. The mother was a Miss BARKER, born in Caswell County, N. C., in 1798, and died in 1874. H. F. Baucom was raised and educated at home.

In 1853 he married Catharine T., daughter of James and Sarah BOND. She was born in Williamson County in 1829, and died in July, 1883. Mr. Baucom has seven children living: —-, now teaching in the collegiate institute at Princeton, KY.; Dr. James B., living near Fort Worth, Tex.; John F., a merchant at Gates, Tenn.; Maggie, wife of A. S. WELLS; Josephine, wife of A. ALLEN; Hogue and Katie.

In January, 1856, Mr. Baucom came to Haywood County and located where he now resides, four miles north of Woodville. April 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company L. Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, under Capt. Alex DUCKWORTH, and held the rank of sergeant, being with this company fifteen months; then went into Company G, Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry, under Capt. Bruce SANDERS, and was in the battles of Corinth, Lafayette (Ga.), Harrisburg, Bolivar and Britton’s Lane, and returned home in September, 1864. Mr. Baucom is a Democrat and a Mason, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church, having been an elder in it for thirty years. He is a kind man, and has been quite successful in business.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

DAVIS, Nathan C.

Nathan C. DAVIS, a well known resident of Decatur County, was born July 14. 1843, in Hardin County. His father, Joseph DAVIS, was a native of Wake County, N.C., born February 7, 1805; he came to Maury County, Tenn., in 1829, where be carried on the blacksmith business; from there he went to Hardin County; was married to Harriet PERRY, a native of Williamson County. Tenn., but a descendant of North Carolinians.

The subject of this sketch is the eighth of fourteen children: received such education as the country schools of that day afforded, at Clifton, Tenn. When war was declared he enlisted in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, under command of J. B. BIFFLE, took part in the Parkers Cross Roads fight, Trenton, Humboldt, also in the engagements at Franklin and Thompson’s Station: he followed Straight and participated in combats at Town Creek, Day’s Gap, Sand Mountain and Gadsden, capturing the enemy at Pine Bluff; Mr. DAVIS was taken at Clifton by Murphy, but released by Capt. Sam MARTIN.

When peace was declared, he returned home and resumed farming; was married November 12, 1868, to Miss M. A. JOHNSON, of Hardin County, whose father was a native of that county; her mother was born in Alabama. To Nathan C. and M. A. (JOHNSON) DAVIS seven children were born; those living are Thomas J., William N., Benjamin F., Edgar H. and Mary E., James S. and an infant are both dead, November 24, 1882, Mrs. DAVIS died. Mr. DAVIS married the second time in January, 1883, to Mrs. Mary H. (STEPHENS) HARRELL, of Savannah, Tenn., a daughter of Col. H. H. STEPHENS, who was born in Boone, Bourbon Co., Ky.; her mother, Elizabeth (THARP) STEPHENS was the first white child born in Florence, Ala. She was educated at Louisville, Ky. To Mr. DAVIS‘ second marriage one child has been born, Perry, a son. Mr. and Mrs. DAVIS are earnest members of the Methodist Church. Mr. DAVIS is a steadfast Democrat and a courteous gentleman. — Transcribed by David Donahue

History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, Mcnairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

WELLS, John W.

JOHN W. WELLS was born May 15, 1843, in Rutherford County, Tenn.  His father, Thomas P. Wells. was a native of Virginia, born in September, 1811.  When a young man he moved to Williamson County, where he married Miss Susan Smith, a native of this State.  To this union six children were born, of whom our subject is the fourth.  The mother of these children died when our subject was about nine years old, and the father afterward married Miss Frances Tune, and by her he became the father of two children — a son and daughter.

Thomas P. Wells moved to Illinois in 1866, where he now resides; he is a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and is also a farmer.  Mrs. Frances (Tune) Wells is now dead.  Our subject came to this county with his parents when but eight years of age, and here he was educated at the Flat Creek Academy.  In October,1861, he enlisted in the Forty-first Tennessee Confederate Infantry and served in that command about two years.  He was then left at Jackson, La., on account of illness, and was there captured and paroled by the Federal Army.  He had been captured with his regiment at Fort Donelson and held as a prisoner of war until September, 1862, when he was exchanged.

In September, 1866, he married Miss Sarah E. Shoffner, a native of this county and a daughter of Col. L. Shoffner.  To this union were born two sons, Othniel D. and Willie S., both living.  The mother of these children died September 4, 1873, and in 1874 their father married Miss Margaret C. Jenkins, a native of this county and a daughter of Rev. William Jenkins.  To this union the following children were born:  Susan M., Thomas E., Edgar J., Ethel and Herbert, all living.  Our subject owns a farm of 235 acres on Duck River, all rich bottom land.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and belongs to Shelbyville Benevolent Lodge, No. 122, and he takes an active interest in educational matters.  He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

WALL, Simeon V. (Prof.)

PROF. SIMEON V. WALL was born in Williamson County, Tenn., August 22, 1844, son of John B. and Martha E. (Wilson) Wall, and of Scotch-Irish descent.  The parents were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1799 and 1808 and died December 31, 1870, and April 15, 1859, respectively.  They were married in 1819 and were the parents of thirteen children.  The father was a soldier in the Confederate Army notwithstanding the fact that he was over age.  He was an old-time Whig, although an intimate friend of James K. Polk.  He was a soldier in the Indian war of 1836.  His father, Clement Wall, came to Williamson County, Tenn., in 1804.

Our immediate subject, Simeon Wall, was a student in Harpeth Academy before the war.  He enlisted in the Twentieth Tennessee Regiment and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Chickamauga and Franklin and was in many of the battles of the Georgia campaign.  Of his war record the Review and Journal of Franklin, Tenn., said: “It is well known that when a mere boy he left this county to serve in the Southern Army and he was recognized all over the army as a brave and gallant soldier.”  After the war, owing to the financial embarrassment of his father, he completed his education through his own exertions.  He has been professor in academies and colleges for nearly twenty years and is one of the successful educators of Tennessee.

He is proprietor of the Bedford Academy at Bell Buckle, Tenn., but is soon to sever his connection with this school and take charge of the Culleoka Academy as co-principal.  July 28, 1868, our subject married Miss Nannie J. Comer, daughter of Rev. J. J. Comer of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. and Mrs. Wall are the parents of nine children — seven sons and two daughters.  Prof. Wall is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

WAITE, Warren

WARREN WAITE, a prominent farmer of District No. 2, was born June 9, 1827, in Bedford County, near Wartrace.  His father, George Waite, was a native of Person County, N. C., born November 18, 1790, and was of English lineage.  Our subject’s paternal grandfather, Robert Waite, emigrated from England to North Carolina during colonial times, and was a surveyor of lands.  George Waite, when a boy, moved with his parents to Tennessee, first to Williamson County, and subsequently to Bedford County, where his parents died.

He married Miss Nancy B. Warren, a native of North Carolina, born November 30, 1796, and of English-Irish lineage.  To this union six children were born.  The mother died December 5, 1838, and the father December 21, 1857.  The father was a natural mechanic in wood and iron work, and was also a farmer.  Our subject received a practical education in the country schools, and remained with his parents until he reached his majority, when he began merchandising, which he continued about twenty years; also carried on farming at the same time.  In 1853 he married Miss Rutha S. Yell, a native of Coffee County, Tenn., and to this union were born the following children:  George E., Nancy A., Warren S. and James W., all living.  Mr. Waite owns a farm of 600 acres, all under a good state of cultivation.  He was formerly a Whig, but is now a  Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

VANNATTA, James

JAMES VANNATTA was born February 9, 1811, in Williamson County, Tenn., and was reared and educated in the country.  January 12, 1831, he was united in marriage to Miss Martha Watson, and by her became the father of three children:  Samuel, Hibernah K. and John S., only one of whom is living.  Mrs. Vannatta died in 1839, and for his second wife Mr. Vannatta took Mrs. Jerusha (Clardy) Nash, and to them were born the following children:  Delphia A., Joseph R., George W., Charity A., Eliza F., Christopher C. and Nannie D.

In 1850 Mr. Vannatta moved to Bedford County, where he engaged in farming and stock raising.  Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. Vannatta’s parents were C. C. and Nancy (Louder) Vannatta, born in North Carolina and Kentucky, respectively. T he father came to Tennessee at an early day, locating in Williamson County, near Triune.  To him and wife were born the following children:  Maria, James and Katie; only one, James, is now living.  The father was in the war of 1812, and was with Jackson at New Orleans.  He died on his way home from that place.   His widow died in 1839.  Both were earnest workers in the Methodist. Episcopal Church South.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

THOMPSON, Zach

ZACH THOMPSON was born July 7, 1844, at Lebanon, Wilson Co., Tenn.  His father, Col. Robert E. Thompson, is a native of Bedford County, Tenn., born in 1822 and of Irish descent.  He moved to Williamson County with his parents when a small boy and subsequently was educated at Lebanon, Wilson County, and began the practice of law at that place.  He bas been a member of the Legislature several times and is a prominent lawyer of Lebanon.

He married Miss Mary Tolliver, a native of Lebanon, and to this union nine children were born, of whom the subject is the eldest.  Zach Thompson was educated at Cumberland University, Lebanon, and upon passing sixteen years of age he enlisted in the Seventh Tennessee Confederate Infantry.  He served in that regiment about eighteen months and was then transferred to the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry and with that command served until the close of the war.  He then returned home and read law and practiced at Lebanon until 1873.

November 21, 1872, Miss Lettie Cannon, a native of Bedford County, became his wife.  To this Union were born two children:  Robert E., and Mary L., both living.  In 1873 they moved upon the place where they now reside, which is about six miles northeast of Shelbyville.  The farm consists of 820 acres, all under a good state of cultivation.  In connection with farming Mr. Thompson has run a distillery for the last three years.  In politics he is a stanch Democrat.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

PICKLE, M.P.

M. P. PICKLE was born August 24, 1838, in Farmington, Marshall Co., Tenn.  His father, Maj. Pickle, a native of Bedford County, was born in 1813, and was a successful farmer.  He died in March, 1862, in this county.  Our subject’s mother, Catherine Pickle, was born in Williamson County in 1813, and is still living at the advanced age of seventy-three.

Our subject remained with his parents on the farm until he was twenty years of age.  He then engaged in farming for himself.  In 1869 he engaged in the merchandise business in this county, which he continued for about six years.  He then moved his business to Rich Creek, Marshall County, where he sold goods for about two years, after which he sold his interest and again returned to agricultural pursuits, together with stock raising.  Since 1884 he has been engaged in the lumber business, shipping cedar lumber exclusively.

July 29, 1859,  he was married to Mary Ann Frances Atkisson, of this county, who was burn April 23, 1837.  This union resulted in the birth of nine children, two of whom, Andrew and Murry F., are dead.  The names of the seven living are, respectively, Major A., James M., George W., Sarah E., Henry J., Annie C. and Minerva P.

Our subject’s educational advantages were not of the best, consequently he received but a district school education.  Owing to this he has always felt a deep interest in all enterprises pertaining to the education of the rising, generation.  He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, of which he was ordained deacon about 1868.  He has always been a peaceful, quiet man, and has never been summoned before the court for any misdemeanor whatever.  He is a Republican in politics.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.