MILLER, F.N.

F.N. MILLER, editor of the Manchester Times and a prominent citizen of Manchester, was born at Port Hudson, La., on December 5, 1853, the son of Albert and Delilah (Saunders) MILLER, the former born October 18, 1822, in Indiana, and the latter May 1, 1832, in Kentucky, and still living in Port Hudson, La. The parents were married about 1846. In 1861 the elder MILLER enlisted in the Confederate Company E, Twenty-first Mississippi Regiment Infantry, and was killed in the battle of Chickamauga in 1863. He was a successful brick-mason.

Our subject is the third of five children, and after a good academical education he served an apprenticeship as printer at Woodville, Miss., for four years. In 1869 he made a nine year’s tour of western cities, working in Texas, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kentucky and Nebraska. Returning to Tennessee in 1879 he spent a year in Union City, and then bought a half interest in a journal called Our Country in Dresden. A year later he went to Nashville and entered the Banner office, and in 1881 came to Manchester and established the Times, which, through his constant attention and ability, has become recognized as one of the leading Democratic journals in this section of the country. Published at $1 per year, it has a circulation of 600.

December 14, 1880, our subject was married to Alice J. CASTLEMAN, born March 16, 1856, in Weakley County, Tenn. She is a lady of intelligence and culture. The two children who were born to them (both daughters) died in infancy. Mr. MILLER is a stanch Democrat and the columns of the Times are made to mirror his political faith. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while his wife is a Missionary Baptist. He is United States commissioner of the middle district of Tennessee.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

TEACHOUT, E.B.

E. B. Teachout, ticket agent, express agent and telegraph operator of Huntingdon, was born July, 1845, in Ohio, and is the son of S. M. and C. A. (Bolton) Teachout. The father and mother were natives of the Buckeye State and he was a farmer by occupation; for the past few years have been living in the city of New York. They have three children living; Frank, who resides in Memphis, railroading; Clara, wife of Joseph Payne, who lives in New York, and E. B., our subject.

He was educated in the schools of his native State, remaining with his parents there until he was fifteen years old. The first year after leaving home he worked on a farm. In 1863 he enlisted in Company I, Ninth Regiment Ohio Cavalry, United States Army. He took an active part in the battles at Decatur, Florence, Nashville and numerous minor engagements. After the battle at Nashville, and while on his way to Athens, he injured his right heel, as the result of which a surgical operation was performed. He has never fully recovered from the wound, receiving $4 per month as pension. He was honorably discharged six months previous to the surrender, on account of disability.

During his illness he commenced the study of telegraphy, at Brownsboro, Ala. In 1866 he assumed charge of an office at Tantallon, Tenn. While there he was attacked by a catamount while seated in his office. A long and bloody hand to hand fight ensued. As Mr. Teachout was about to get the better of the animal an assistant entered, and the animal was soon dispatched. In 1867 he went to Dresden, Weakley County, and was railroad operator at said place six or seven years. He then went to New York City and was proprietor of a hotel for eighteen months. In 1877 he came to Huntingdon and entered upon his duties at this place—the railroad office, which position he has since held with good satisfaction.

In July, 1868, he married Miss Addie Ross, daughter of W. R. and Adeline Ross. Mrs. Teachout was born in 1846, in Weakley County. They have four children: Charles, Olla, Stanley and Alva. Mr. Teachout is a man of good business capacity, courteous, obliging and very popular as a railroad official. He has a nice home and a beautiful residence. In politics he is a Democrat, voting for S. J. Tilden in 1876; and is an ancient member of A. O. U. W. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

STOFLE, Robert M.

Robert M. Stofle, was born in Weakley County, Tenn., April 16, 1850, and is one of two sons and eight daughters, surviving members of a family of twelve children born to Thomas and Frances (Hoggard) Stofle. His father was of Henry County and his mother of Weakley County, Tenn. They were married in 1849, and engaged in farming in Henry County until his death in 1885. His mother still lives in Weakley County.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was twenty-three years old, and October 9, 1873, married Johanna Johnson. Three children have been the issue of this union: John Thomas, deceased; William and Robert. In 1874 Mr. Stofle was elected constable of his district, in Weakley County, serving four years; he then removed to McKenzie, Tenn., and engaged in the mercantile business, under the firm name of Gilbert, Stofle & Co., which copartnership was continued three years, when he embarked in the livery and live stock trade, which he still continues, supplying McKenzie with first-class livery stock, carriages, buggies, etc.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

LAWHON, H.C.

H. C. Lawhon, the editor of the Tri-County News, was born March 21, 1850, and is one of a family of six children born to F. E. and Miranda (Martin) Lawhon, our subject and a sister being the only surviving members. His father was a Virginian, and his mother a North Carolinian; both moved to Sumner County, Tenn., when young, were married there, and soon after moved to Weakley County in about 1838, his mother dying there in 1850, his father then moving to Arkansas, where he followed farming, and where he died in 1856.

Our subject after his father’s death lived with his brother in Dyer County, Tenn., and had the benefit of limited educational advantages. In 1863 he enlisted in the Twelfth Kentucky Confederate Cavalry, with which he remained until the close of the war; he then engaged in mining in Colorado until 1880, when he returned to Arkansas, and embarked in journalism, continuing in the business there until 1884, when he moved to McKenzie, Tenn., and succeeded J. B. Gilbert in the publication of the Tri-County News, which he has since edited and controlled. In 1884 he married Miss Ella Allen, daughter of Rev. W. J. F. Allen, and has had three daughters, two of whom are living. Mr. Lawhon is an Episcopalian and Mrs. Lawhon a Baptist.


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

KYLE, Robert G.

Robert G. Kyle was born December 7, 1813, in Williamson County, Tenn., and is a farmer by occupation. He is of a family of eight children—four sons and two daughters still living—born to Barney C. and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Kyle, both from Georgia, his father of Irish descent, and his mother of Scotch-English; they were married in Georgia, and about 1812 moved to Williamson County, Tenn., remaining a few years, and then moved to Madison County, Ala., for a short time, and then located in Giles County, Tenn., remaining there six years, and moved to Weakley County, Tenn., in 1827, and followed farming until 1839, when they moved to Panola County, Miss., where his father died in 1861, his mother in 1873.

Mr. Robert Kyle remained with his parents until of age, then attended and taught school one year in Weakley County, after which he spent one year in Georgia, then returned to Weakley County, and was elected constable in 1839, serving eight years; then he engaged in stock trading two years, and in 1849 embarked in general merchandising at Caledonia, which occupied, his time for four years, when he returned to stock trading a few years, and in 1855 began farming on a tract of land he had previously purchased in Weakley County. He filled the office of county trustee in 1856-57, and in 1858 married Flora Elizabeth Crittendon, and continued farming until 1872, when they moved to McKenzie, Tenn., where they have since resided. By his marriage he has four sons and two daughters: Jno. S., William M., Emma D., Robert B., James D. and Mora. His farm in Weakley County contains 570 acres. He is a member of the F. & A. M., and himself and family belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

GILBERT Sr., J.M.

Hon. J. M. Gilbert, Sr., was born in Hancock County, Ga., June 17, 1800, and is the only surviving member of a family of four sons and five daughters born to Benjamin and Amelia (McKenzie) Gilbert, both of whom were of Virginia, where they were married, and directly after moved to Georgia and raised their family there, and followed farming until 1811, then moved to Livingston County, Ky., continuing farming until 1826, then moved to Weakley County, Tenn., where they died.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was twenty years old, and was appointed constable at the early age of nineteen, and at twenty was appointed deputy sheriff of same county. October 9, 1821, he married Frances W. Busey, of Kentucky; they followed farming there until 1823, when they moved to Carroll County, locating near the present site of McKenzie. The whole county at that time was barrens, covered with wild grass, there being then but very few families in the county. He began farming, and was one of the pioneer farmers of the county. About 1834 he, with several others, made the old Paris and Huntingdon road. He built the first house on the present site of McKenzie, but the town did not commence building until many years afterward. Mr. Gilbert knows of but three men living who were in Weakley, Carroll and Henry Counties at the time he came. They are William Hamilton, Reuben Edmonson, and Tilman Johnson, all of Weakley County. He was engaged in the commission business at Memphis in 1867-69, and during the same time was engaged in the mercantile business in Weakley County. The town of McKenzie began to build in 1857, at the building of the Louisville Railroad.

Mr. Gilbert was coroner of Henry County about 1876. Although temporarily out of the county a few months at a time, he has made his permanent home in Carroll County since first settling there. From his marriage with Miss Busey he had four sons and five daughters, five of the latter and two of the former are now living; their mother died July 4, 1867, and in 1870 Mr. Gilbert married Mrs. Louisa Dumas who is still living. In 1885 Mr. Gilbert was elected mayor of McKenzie, and still fills the office. During the first of the war he was employed by the Confederate Government to furnish labor and provender until the evacuation of Columbus. He then went to Texas, where he remained until the close of the war. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, also of the F. & A. M., of which he is Knight Templar, and has filled all of the prominent state offices of the fraternity.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.