TAYLOR, A.J.

A. J. TAYLOR, a physician and farmer, was born January 3, 1831, in Washington County, Tenn., but from his infancy until 1853, he was partly raised in Greene County and partly in Cocke County. He came to his present home in 1853. He studied medicine with his brother, Dr. A. L. TAYLOR, and in 1856 began the practice of medicine where he now lives, and always with splendid success as a physician and financier. His years and susceptibility to exposure have compelled him to strive to withdraw from practice as much as possible. In 1862 he entered the First Tennessee Cavalry (United States army), and was afterward transferred to the Third Tennessee. He served until the summer of 1863, when, on account of ill health, he was forced to withdraw from the army. He was engaged during all his service as contract surgeon.

December 28, 1870, he married Martha J., daughter of John and Anna (THOMAS) BREAKBILL, both of Dutch origin. She was born and reared in Blount County. Their children are Nancy A. (Now Mrs. BOGLE), John S., Ira A., Andrew J., Mary J. and Clifford A. The family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. The Doctor is a Republican, and cast his first vote for Pierce. He was school commissioner two years, and is a prominent man in his community. He is the youngest of nine children of John W. and Mary (BRITT) TAYLOR, both born on the Nero River, West Virginia, the former of English and the latter of Irish-English origin, and residents of Washington County, Tenn., from a very early age, but moved to Greene County when our subject was an infant. The grandfather’s name was William TAYLOR. Beginning in very limited circumstances, Dr. TAYLOR now owns 316 acres, part of which is highly cultivated, and located eleven miles east of Maryville.

Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

Van HUSS, J.P.

J. P. Van HUSS, farmer, was born in March, 1833, in Carter County, on his present farm. He was educated in the common schools, and when twenty years old began life, and now owns 157 acres of fine land. In 1860 Rebecca, a daughter of Daniel and Barbara (Roadcap) NEAD, of Hagerstown, Md., and Rockbridge County, Va., respectively, became his wife, About 1837 they came to Washington County, where the father died. The children born to our subject and wife are as follows: Minnie F., James M., Daniel F., Barbara E., Flora J., William L. and John D.

He and his wife are Baptists, the latter of the German Church. He is a Republican and Prohibitionist. He was a justice in 1860 and has been since 1882. From January, 1888 to 1887, he was a trustee in 1866, and served four terms. He was deputy sheriff three years, and is a Master Mason. He was twice elected moderator of the Watauga Association of Baptists, and was also clerk of the same body from its organization in 1868 for six consecutive years. He is the ninth of eleven children (five of whom yet survive) of Mathias and Lovina (Duggar) Van HUSS, natives of Carter (now Johnson) County and the present Carter County respectively. The former was a soldier in 1812, a Whig, a farmer, and a blacksmith. He was a son of Valentine Van HUSS, of North Carolina, and of Carter County, the latter born about 1778. He was of Dutch descent, while the mother was of Scotch-English origin. The mother was a daughter of was a daughter of William DUGGAR, a native of North Carolina, and a pioneer of Dugger’s Ferry. He was a soldier of the Revolution and married three times. The Duggar family are long lived.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

SCOTT, J.P.

J. P. SCOTT, proprietor of the Watauga Woolen Mills, and one of the prominent citizens of Carter County, was born in that county August 19, 1834, and is the son of John and Jane (Humphreys) SCOTT. The father was born in Washington County in 1797, and was a soldier of the war of 1812, participating in the battle of Horse Shoe. He was a carpenter by trade, and also followed farming. He was quite prominent during his life, and served as a captain in the militia. He died in 1857. His father was Absalom SCOTT, a native of Scotland, who immigrated to Maryland, where he was married, and then came to Tennessee and settled in Washington County, of which he was one of the pioneers. The mother was born in Carter County, on Doe River, three miles above Elizabethton in 1808, and was the daughter of Elisha HUMPHREYS, a farmer of Carter County. She died in 1868. She was a member of the Baptist Church. To the parents were born nine children, of which our subject is the fifth.

He was reared partly on the farm, and also worked at different trades. In 1869 he associated himself with Messrs. Isaac SLINKER and C. H. LEWIS, and established the Doe River Woolen Mills both of whom were Northern men, and were attracted to the location, and its rare advantages by the report of the State geologists just after the war, and by the lectures delivered in the North by N. G. TAYLOR, the father of the present governor. Remaining with that establishment for about six years, he then sold out his interest in that mill and established the Watauga Mills, of which he is the present proprietor. He was married, in 1870, to Emma Josephine FLETCHER, who was born at Newport, Cocke County, in 1844, and is the daughter of A. J. FLETCHER. To this union seven children have been born, two of whom are dead.

The Watauga Woolen Mills, J. P. Scott, proprietor, of Elizabethton, Tenn., were established in 1876 by the present proprietor. The mills have a daily capacity of about 300 yards, while during the year 1886 upward of 45,000 yards of goods were manufactured. It has water and steam power and 815 spindles, and uses 150 pounds per day. About $15,000 capital is invested. The large two story building is on the Watauga River, one mile from Elizabethton

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

JOBE, A. (Dr.)

Dr. A. JOBE was born near Elizabethton, Carter Co., Tenn., October 9, 1817, the son of Joshua and Ruth (Tipton) JOBE. The former was born in Washington County (before the State of Tennessee was formed) September 15,1785. He was the son of David JOBE who immigrated to this new country, about the year 1777, from Shenandoah County, Va. He owned and resided on the farm where Johnson City now stands, and died there, about the year 1799.

Our subject’s father was a farmer, and was once sheriff of Carter County. In the war of 1812, he volunteered and marched with Gen. Jackson’s Army to the Horse Shoe, Talledega, and other battle fields, and then on to Mobile, Ala. About 1821 he moved from Carter to Blount County, and after living there about ten years (The Governor permitting settlers to move into the Cherokee Nation), he moved in about ten miles of where Dalton now stands. While residing here our subject, fifteen years old, attended the councils of the Indians for two or three years, and was present at the concluding of the treaty between the General Government, and the head men of the Nation. The father died at Ringgold, Ga, May 8, 1868. The mother was the daughter of Thomas TIPTON (son of Col. John TIPTON, who helped achieve American Independence, at the battle of King’s Mountain, and Indian battles He also fought the memorable Franklin battle, against Gov. Sevier), was born in Carter County, August 27, 1791, and died at Ringgold, Ga., May 22, 1864.

In June, 1836, there being trouble with the Indians, especially the Creeks, the Government called out troops, and our subject being then nearly nineteen, volunteered in the United States Army, to protect white settlers, and gather up and remove the destitute bands of Indians, west of the Mississippi. On completing his term of service and receiving an honorable discharge, he came to Jonesboro, and entered school, where he remained until February, 1839, when he commenced the mercantile business, with his brother, under the firm name of A. & D. Jobe, at Ringgold, Ga. In 1841 he commenced reading medicine with Dr. Samuel B. CUNNINGHAM, of Jonesboro, Tenn. In 1848 he commenced practice, at Burusyille, N. C. In 1844 he married Sophronia, only daughter of James H. POTEET, born in Yancey County, N.C., May 8, 1826, and in 1845 moved to Elizabethton, Tenn., where he practiced medicine and surgery up to and during the war.

In 1848-49 he attended Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky., and graduated from the medical department. In February, 1866, he received the appointment of special agent of the postoffice department, with headquarters at Raleigh, N. C., and served in that capacity three years and a half. While in this office, the Secretary of the Interior, learning that the Doctor had a knowledge of Indian character, procured a leave of absence from the postoffice department, an appointed him special agent of Indian affairs, and sent him to the Chippewa Nation, in the northern part of Minnesota. This was a dangerous mission. The Indians had recently murdered their principal Chief, and were ready to go on “the war path.” By traveling about 800 miles in the Nation, and holding councils with them at their towns, he was enabled to appease their wrath, and settle their misunderstandings. Our subject and his wife are Methodists. Five of their eleven children are deceased. E. D., the only living son, married Eva TAYLOR, sister to Gov. TAYLOR; Emma is Mrs. J. B. MILLER; Mollie is Mrs. Dr. HUNTER; Hattie is the wife of Nat. W. TAYLOR, brother of Gov. TAYLOR; the single daughters are Ruth and Sallie.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

HUNTER, E.E. (Dr.)

Dr. E. E. HUNTER, of Elizabethton, was born in Washington County, Tenn., October 10, 1845, the son of Joseph and Maranda (Harris) HUNTER. His father was a farmer by profession, and was born in 1808, and died in August, 1885. His mother was horn in 1812, the daughter of Dr. John HARRIS, a most celebrated physician, and minister of the Methodist Church. The mother died in 1863. Our subject is the youngest son of eight children, four sons and four daughters. When seventeen he attended school at Jonesboro for three years and afterward at Eastman’s Business College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. After spending some time in Illinois he returned to Jonesboro, and in 1869 began the study of medicine under the celebrated Dr. SEVIER. In 1870-71 he attended the medical department of the University of Tennessee. In March, 1871, he began the practice of medicine in Washington County, Tenn.

He was married September 19, 1871, to Miss Mollie JOBE, a daughter of Dr. JOBE, of Elizabethton, Tenn., and their union has been blessed with seven children. He and his wife belong to the Methodist Church South. He removed to Elizabethton in March, 1877, and there resumed the practice of his profession, and in the same year purchased an interest in the Doe River Woolen Mills, the first establishment of the kind in East Tennessee. In 1885 he attended and graduated at the Kentucky School of Medicine. In August, 1885, he was appointed United States medical examiner, and was placed on the Johnson City board, of which he is president.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

BROWN, C.N.

C. N. BROWN, a farmer in the Ninth District, was born February 28, 1887, in Carter County. He received a good common-school education, was reared on a farm, and has since followed farming. He was thrown upon his own resources when of age. He was married in 1882 to Miss Nancy WORLEY, a daughter of James B. and Emaline (Shell) WORLEY natives of Washington County, Va., and Sullivan County, Tenn., respectively. Mr. WORLEY’S mother was of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. WORLEY were active workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a very successful and enterprising farmer, and accumulated property quite easily. To Mr. and Mrs. BROWN seven children have been born, viz.: Lilly, Laura (now Mrs. Williams), Charles, Eugene, Lola (deceased), Lela and Mamie.

Mr. and Mrs. BROWN are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, in which Mr. BROWN has been treasurer and deacon for several years. Mr. BROWN is a Democrat in politics. He is a Master Mason. He was the eldest of six children of L H. BROWN, an old resident of Carter County Tenn. Mrs. Emaline WORLEY was a daughter of Aaron and Catherine (Glover) SHELL, natives of Sullivan County, Tenn. Mr. SHELL was of English descent. He was a prominent minister of the gospel in the Methodist Episcopal Church.

I. H. BROWN, the father of our subject, was born March 4,1810, in Washington County, Tenn., and when fifteen years old came to Carter County, Tenn., and excepting six years be lived at Blountville, has since resided in Carter County. He is a carpenter and cabinet-maker by trade. He was married April 14, 1856, to Miss Ruth NAVE, a daughter of John and Lizzie (Carriger) NAVE, natives of Pennsylvania, and among the earliest settlers of Carter County, Tenn. They were of Dutch descent. Six children blessed this union. Mr. BROWN served Carter County two years as register, and two terms as trustee, being elected on a Democratic ticket in a county which usually went Whig by about 1,700. He was the youngest of six children of Jacob and Christina (Ramey) BROWN, natives of Germany and Rockham County, Va., respectively. Mr. BROWN was brought to the United States by his parents when quite small. He served as a solider in the Revolutionary war. Mrs. I. H. BROWN died October 6, 1858. Mr. BROWN was married December 2, 1855, to Mrs. Margaret M. WILLIAMS. Three children blessed the union. Mr. BROWN began life a poor man, and what he is now worth is the fruit of his own practical business ability.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.