COUNTESS, John M.

John M. COUNTESS, a well known resident of the Third District, was born August 11, 1841, in Warren County, Tenn. His father, Asa COUNTESS, was a native of Tennessee, .a brick mason by trade. He married about 1833 a daughter of John MARTIN, of North Carolina, who came to Tennessee. To that union seven children were born, J. M. being the fourth and only surviving one. Asa COUNTESS enlisted in the Fifth Confederate Regiment, under command of B. J. HILL. He died in Mississippi after twelve months of gallant and faithful service.

Our subject received a fair education in the common schools of Warren County. He enlisted in the Sixteenth Tennessee, Confederate Army, under command of John H. SAVAGE. He remained in the service about one year: took part in the battles of Huttonville and Chute Mountains, Va. He became dissatisfied with the cause he was aiding, and on the morning of May 15, 1862, received a pass at Corinth, Miss., to be good until 10 o’clock. When about eleven 2 miles south of Corinth he met a detachment who claimed his time had expired. He said that his brother was sick in a house at a short distance, and by this means succeeded in passing. Shortly afterward he entered a swamp, and remained there through the day, traveling by night until ha reached a point about one hundred miles south. The man whom he hired for a guide had a horse upon which they took turns in riding, in that way resting themselves. While attempting to cross a river with several other fugitives from Tennessee companies, he was arrested by the town authorities, tried, condemned and sent back. Two officers started back to the army with the prisoners, four in number. While at supper, where they were camped for the night, Mr. Countess and his mate finished eating before the others. They stepped back, and covered by the darkness, slipped away unnoticed. They waded a small stream and spent the night about half a mile from the camp, continuing their journey the next morning. When they reached the river they secured a broad plank, and with one on each end crossed in safety and got home without being again molested. About four months later he enlisted in the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry of the Union Army, under command of Col. W. B. STOKES, taking part in the terrific battle of Stone’s River.

At the close of the war Mr. COUNTESS returned home and resumed his farming. In 1868 he went to Illinois; spent three years there, going to Missouri, and later to Middle Tennessee, finally settling in Decatur County, where he has since resided. April 20, 1866, he was married to Minnie BLACKWELL, whose parents were natives of Warren County. To their union six children were born. Those living are Mary, wife of Dr. E. G. HOWELL, a practicing physician of Decatur County; Margaret, John, George W., William B’s death occurred September 8, 1879, when two years of age. Mr. COUNTESS is an earnest and active Republican, a member of the Masonic fraternity and K. of H. – Transcribed by David Donahue

History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, Mcnairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

WOOTEN, J.D.

J. D. WOOTON, M.D., a leading physician of Manchester, was born in Warren County,Tenn., April 5, 1840. He is the son of Jonathan and Nancy (Hampton) WOOTON, the former born in 1792 in North Carolina, and died in Warren County, in 1877; the latter born in 1802 in Kentucky, and died in February,1886. The elder WOOTON was a farmer, a soldier of the Revolution, and a consistent member of the Christian Church, while in political faith he was a Whig. His wife, a near relative of Gen. Wade HAMPTON, was a member of the Baptist Church.

Our subject, the youngest of six children, received, besides his early education, a course at Burritt College. He soon after sold goods for his brother-in-law, Dr. A.B. DAVIS, at what is now Viola. In 1859 he entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, and graduated before he reached his majority. He soon enlisted as second lieutenant in Company D, Thirty-fifth Tennessee Regiment Infantry, Confederate Army. He served as assistant surgeon, and acted as chief surgeon at various times. He acquired considerable reputation for skill in his long service, surrendering with Johnston at Greensboro, N.C. A hip-joint amputation of the leg of a comrade might be mentioned as an example of his skill and then confidence of his fellows. He located at Viola, and for fifteen years was one of the leading physicians of the county.

Since 1880 he has been equally successful in Manchester, engaging also in merchandising with a stock of $10,000, the care of his two plantations of 1,500 and 450 acres in Coffee and Warren Counties, the latter of which feeds a stock of about 100 young mules. He owns a half interest in the Duck River Paper Mills,the largest south of the Ohio River, and the only ones in Tennessee, that make wood pulp. He is a self-made man. July 20, 1865, he married Fannie HICKERSON, a cultured lady, daughter of Judge W.P. HICKERSON. They have two children: Wade H., aged seventeen, and Lillie, aged twenty. Mr. WOOTON is a believer in the Christian religion, though not a member of any church, while in political faith he is Democratic. Mrs. WOOTON is a member of the Christian Church.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

STROUD, B.S.

B.S. STROUD, a prominent citizen of Manchester, and register of Coffee County, was born in Warren County, Tenn., February 14, 1854. He is the son of B.S. and Nancy (Winton) STROUD, the former born in 1825 in Warren County, and the latter February 2, 1826, in Coffee County. Their deaths occurred October 12, 1853, and June 4, 1869, respectively. After their marriage, about 1844, the elder STROUD was farming and shipping and trading in livestock. He was politically a Whig.

Our subject, one of four children, was educated at Manchester College, under Rev. W.D. CARNES. After four years’ prospecting in Texas and Arkansas, he returned to Manchester and engaged in the printing business, and soon bought a half interest in the Manchester Guardians.In the fall of 1878 he was made deputy clerk of chancery court, Coffee County. A year later, finishing an unexpired term of register, he was afterward elected to the office, serving two terms. December 17, 1879, he was married to Fannie POWERS, born September 13, 1860, in Manchester, and educated at the college there. Their son, Horace, was born March 20, 1881. Mr. STROUD is a Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

RAMSEY, W.

W. RAMSEY, a farmer of Coffee County, was born April 3, 1823, in Warren County. Samuel and Pollie (Strowd) RAMSEY, his parents, lived in Warren County. The elder, Mrs. RAMSEY’s father, was one of the first settlers of that county.

Our subject is of English and Irish descent. November 30, 1852, he married Rachel PARKER, by whom he had four children. She was a member of the Christian Church and died March 15,1862. August 5, 1865, he married Ellen NORTON, daughter of J.M. and Mary (Wilkinson) NORTON of Coffee County. They have one child. Our subject taught school, having been educated at the school which was the predecessor of Franklin College, also at Irwin College in Warren County. He, his wife and three children are members of the Christian Church.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

LYNN, Jacob

JACOB LYNN, farmer, was born in Warren County, Tenn., December 23, 1827, son of Andrew J. and Isabella (Hawes) Lynn, and of English extraction.  The father of our subject was born in Warren County, Tenn., in 1805, and the mother in Virginia about 1808.  They were married about the year 1826, and reared a family of seven children.  The father died in Coffee County, Tenn., February 13, 1850, and the mother died in Arkansas in 1865.  Jacob Lynn, Sr., the grandfather of our subject, and Benjamin Stinnett, the grandfather of the last Mrs. Lynn, the wife of our subject, were both in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans.

Our subject received a practical education in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one he began business for himself.  During the civil war he enlisted in the Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment Infantry, and served eighteen months, participating in the battle of Shiloh, and was discharged at Tupelo, Miss., on account of his age.

He has been married four times.  The first marriage occurred in 1847 to Miss Sarah Stroud, of Coffee County, Tenn., and resulted in the birth of one son, John A., who was a. soldier in the late war.  Our subject was married the second time, October 13, 1859, to Mrs. Mary E. L. Giles, daughter of Noble L. Majors.  Of this alliance there were two children, one son and one daughter, named. respectively, Joseph T. and Louise JaneMrs. Lynn was born July 4, 1820, and died in the same county October 15, 1876.  Mr. Lynn was married the third time, September 14, 1877, to Mrs. Mary A. Moses, a native of Tennessee, born March 2, 1882, and died January 26, 1884.  His last marriage occurred April 23, 1885, in Bedford County, Tenn., to Miss Rebecca Hill, daughter of Jacob Hill.  This lady was born November 24, 1841.  Mr. Lynn is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

HIX, J.H.

J. H. HIX was born August 15, 1855, in Bedford County, being a son of J. L. Hix, a retired farmer, living in Shelbyville.  The father was born and raised in Bedford County, as was the mother, nee Hulda Holt, also.  She died in 1883.

The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm to the age of fifteen, when he began clerking in the grocery business.  In 1880 he opened up the bar and confectionery business, which he has ever since very successfully continued.  He was married, January 27, 1881, to Miss Ada Harmon, a native of Warren County, Tenn., then living in Nashville.  One son, John, has been born to this union.  Mr. Hix is a member of the Republican party.  He has never aspired to any public office, but he does a thriving business in his line.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

COMER, John Jackson

JOHN JACKSON COMER. Samuel COMER was a native of England and came to the United States with his wife (formerly a Miss RANDOLPH), a short time before the Revolutionary War and settled in Virginia. He served in the war against the mother country, and was subsequently killed by the Tories. Reuben D. COMER, son of Samuel COMER, was raised by a man named Abner LEA, of Johnson County, N. C. He married a daughter of Thomas WRIGHT, who came from England to South Carolina. Her parents died when she was an infant, and she was raised by Col. Elliott LEE. After her marriage with Mr. COMER they came to Wilson County, Tenn., and became the parents of five sons and two daughters.

John Jackson COMER, the subject of this sketch, was the fourth of their children and was reared on a farm and had charge of his father’s mill and cotton gin. His early education was limited, never having attended school after attaining his fifteenth year. About this time he professed religion. A short time after he began learning the blacksmith business of the Rev. D. B. MOORE, with whom he lived three years. His father at this time moved to Warren County, Tenn., and there our subject worked at his trade. He was happily married to Miss Martha P. PARKER.

In 1845 he was licensed to preach, and in 1853 was received in to the Tennessee Annual Conference, and he has followed his calling in Hickory Creek, Bedford, Smith Fork, Mill Creek, Harpeth, Wesley and Carthage. He was appointed presiding elder of the following districts: Carthage, McMinnville, Savannah and Centerville. At the last conference he was appointed to the Unionville Circuit. In 1880 Mrs. COMER died, and after living a lonely life two years, Rev. COMER married Miss Ella LACRE. His first marriage resulted in four children: Sophronia A. (Mrs. J. P. WALTON), Nannie J. (Mrs. Prof. S. V. WALL), John B., Moltie P. (died in 1880, wife of J. S. KETON). Rev. COMER is now past sixty years of age, but hopes to continue his good work many years. He is much loved and respected by all who know him and is an influential man where he resides.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

AKIN, J.C.

J. C. AKIN, proprietor of the Evans Hotel, was born July 2, 1827, in Granville County, N. C. His father, Thomas AKIN, moved with his family from North Carolina to Maury County, Tenn., about 1830, and lived there till his death. He was a farmer and raised a large family. The genial subject of this sketch was reared on a farm. He came to Shelbyville in 1854, married and engaged in mercantile trade for a short time. He then farmed till 1857, having bought a farm near Shelbyville. He then removed to McMinnville, Warren Co., Tenn., and engaged in the grocery business there a short time, and then at farming till the war, in the meantime having bought two farms and stocked them. During the was he was in the drug business till early in 1865. He then went to Maury County and raised a crop of cotton; thence he returned to McMinnville, and remained till 1878, when he again moved to Shelbyville, and for six years ran the Barksdale House. Since then he has been running the Evans Hotel, the only first-class hotel in the city. He also runs a fruit evaporator in Shelbyville.

He was married, September 18, 1854, to Mrs. America LANE, the widow of Robert LANE, of Marshall county. Her father was Isaac HOLMAN, who was once a member of the Legislature. Mr. AKIN and wife have been members of the Missionary Baptist Church for many years, and are among the leading members of the church at Shelbyville. Mr. AKIN has been chairman and treasurer of the executive board of the Duck River Baptist Association for many years, and at one time was president of the Baptist Sunday-school Association, and of the Bedford County Sunday-school Association. He is a member of the K. of H. Politically he was merely an old-line Whig, but is now a conservative Democrat. He is justly regarded as an enterprising and influential citizen of the county, who has always taken special and active interest in all charitable, religious and moral enterprises. The wife was the mother of four children by her former marriage, two of whom are now living.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

MOORE, J.G.

J.G. Moore, clerk of the county court of Cannon County, is a native of the county, having been born in 1837 and is the eldest of a family of ten children, nine of whom are still living. His parents were William and Elizabeth (Warren) Moore. Both natives of Virginia, the former having been born in 1813, and having come to this country in about 1843. The latter was born in 1816.

The subject of this sketch received his education mainly in the Mountain Creek Institute, Warren County. In 1866 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Taylor, daughter of N.M. Taylor. To this marriage were born six children.

Mr. Moore is a carpenter and builder by trade and also a farmer, though he follows his trade most of the time. In 1872 he was elected register of the county, and filled the position for one term. In August, 1886, he was elected to his present position. He served as magistrate of the district ten years. He is a man well known and highly esteemed by all, and has always given encouragement to every laudable public enterprise. Politically he is a Democrat, and he is a member of both the Odd Fellow and Masonic fraternities. Both himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. In 1861 he joined the Confederate Army, becoming a member of Company H, Eighteenth Tennessee Infantry, of which J.B. Palmer was at the time colonel. He was in many of the hard-fought battles of the war, was wounded at Fort Donelson, and was captured at Missionary Ridge, whence he was taken to Indianapolis, Ind., where he was held prisoner until the close of the war.


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

CUMINGS, J.H. (Hon.)

Hon. J. H. Cumings, of Woodbury, attorney at law, is a native of Warren County, Tenn. and was born in 1839. His parents were Warren and Orlend Cumings, both natives of Warren County, the former having been born in 1814, is a farmer by occupation and held the office of sheriff of Cannon County six years. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1870, and now resides at Woodbury, Tenn.

The subject of this sketch received his literary education at Woodbury, and in 1872 began the study of the law with T.B. Murry of McMinnville, Tenn, and afterward attended the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon,Tenn. He was admitted to the bar in 1873 and has since been engaged in the practice of the law at Woodbury. In November 1885, he was elected to the legislature. He enjoys an extensive and lucrative practice, and in politics he is an ardent Democrat. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Eighteenth Tennessee (Confederate) Infantry, under Capt. H.J. St. John. He was with the company three years and engaged in some of the heavy battles of war. During the last year of the war he was with the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, commanded by Col. Baxter Smith of Nashville. H. A. Wiley of Woodville was his captain. He participated in numerous engagements, was captured once but soon paroled, and returned home in 1865.


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.