GILLESPIE, James H. (Rev.)

Rev. James H. GILLESPIE, a devout minister, and a prominent citizen of Brownsville, Tenn., was born in Blount County, Tenn., August 10. 1804. His parents were Robert and Elizabeth (HOUSTON) Gillespie, and were natives of Virginia. Rev. James Gillespie in early life was engaged with his father in the manufacturing business. In 1825 he graduated at the East Tennessee College, located at Knoxville, Tenn., at that time. He then went to Alabama and engaged in the mercantile business, but in 1827 he entered the theological college at Princeton, J. J., and prepared himself of the university, graduating from there in 1830, and the same year was licensed to preach. In 1831 he was ordained pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Somerville, Ala. He remained there until 1838, when he moved to Franklin County, Ala., where he took charge of the school and filled the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church until 1842.

In 1843 he moved to Denmark , Tenn., and was pastor in the Presbyterian Church until 1868, when he was called to fill the pulpit of Presbyterian Church at Brownsville, remaining in charge until 1872. Since then Mr. Gillespie has been engaged in evangelical work in various churches. He has been an earnest worker in the church, and is perhaps the oldest minister in West Tennessee. October, 1830, Mr. Gillespie married Abigail C. ELLIS, daughter of Col. Samuel and Pricilla ELLIS, of New Jersey. They had three sons and two daughters: Mary, William F. (A minister in Texas), James E., Robert A. (deceased; he was also a minister) and Martha L. Mr. Gillespie is a member of the F. & A. M. and of the I. O. O. F. In politics was formerly a Whig, but is now a Democrat. He has lived a long and useful, and is a consecrated man.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

DUCKWORTH, Alexander (Captain)

Capt. Alexander DUCKWORTH, clerk and master of the chancery court of Brownsville, Tenn., and native of Haywood County, was born March 16, 1832, son of William W. and Mary M. (ALEXANDER) Duckworth, natives respectively of South and North Carolina. Robert W. Duckworth, the Captain’s grandfather, came with his family to Tennessee from North Carolina early in the twenties, and settled near Knoxville. He settled in Madison County, and in, or before, 1830, located in Haywood County, where he died. Here William W. was married and settled. He raised a family of nine children — three sons and one daughter now living: William L., Thomas N., Martha A. (widow of C. F. SMITH), and Alexander who is the eldest. The father died April 8, 1859, followed by the mother’s death the following day.

Capt. Duckworth’s boyhood days were spent in his native county, where he secured a good academical education chiefly by his own exertions. He prepared himself for teaching, and followed that profession until 1859, then began managing his father’s farm. Here he resided until 1862, then joined the Confederate Army, serving as lieutenant and afterward as captain of Company L., Seventh Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, and was seriously wounded in the right arm in a cavalry skirmish at Collierville, Tenn., and has never fully recovered. Capt. Duckworth served with distinction until the close of the war, then returned home and resumed farming and teaching, and resumed the study of law which he had begun in 1858. In 1867 he came to Brownsville and engaged in the study, and later the practice of law.

November 14, 1870, he was appointed clerk and master of the chancery court, of Haywood County by Chancellor James Fentress and held the position continuously under the various chancellors to the present time. He has always been an unswerving Democrat in politics and has taken an active part in the local campaigns of the county. He is a Royal Arch Mason and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1846.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BRIGHT, Aaron D. (Judge)

Judge Aaron D. BRIGHT, attorney at law, of Brownsville, Tenn., was born in Hinds County, Miss, August 10, 1838, son of Aaron D., and Mary G. (WILLIAMS) Bright, natives of North Carolina. The father came to Haywood County, Tenn., in 1832, and located on a farm five miles southeast of Brownsville. In 1836, he removed to Mississippi, where he died in 1840. His widow then returned to Haywood county, where she has since resided.

Our subject was educated Emory and Henry College in Virginia, and East Tennessee University at Knoxville. He left the later institution in 1860, and upon the breaking out of the war, enlisted in the army of Northern Virginia, and serving one year, joined the cavalry service as provost-marshal, serving thus with the rank of captain until the surrender. Previous to the war, he had studied law and engaged in the practice of his profession after his return home. In May, 1883, he was appointed to a position on the referee county, at Jackson, Tenn., and filled that position ably for two years.

October 24, 1867, he married Miss Adelaide R. RIVES, of Fayette County, Tenn., and by her is the father of three sons and two daughters: Prentiss, Aaron D., Mary and Lillie, and Henry Livingston (deceased). Judge Bright is a Democrat in politics and a member of the A. O. U. W., and G. R. fraternities. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he has been an officer of the church and chairman of the board on finance of the Memphis conference for a number of years.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

STONE, I.C.

I.C. STONE, is of English, Irish and Scotch descent. His ancestors settled in the colony of North Carolina. Their descendants mainly kept pace with the tide of immigration to the new States and Territories. The paternal grandfather, Thomas STONE, probably of English, and Scotch origin, married Miss Sally CORDER, of Scotch family, about 1789 in North Carolina on the waters of the Yadkins River, and not long after settled in Tennessee, where the father, C.H. STONE, was born December 22, 1796. The maternal grandfather, Joseph ALLISON, supposed to be partly of English and known to be partly of Irish origin, married Jane DONALDSON, a native of Ireland, and settled in Orange County, N.C., about twelves miles northwest of Hillsboro. Here the mother, the youngest of her parents, was born about 1793. Here she lived until maturity and obtained an ordinary education. The grandfather ALLISON had settled in White County and grandfather STONE had settled in Jackson County, Tenn., before 1818. At the home of the former in White County, the father and mother were married in October, 1818. They had five children of whom our subject was the fourth and the only son.

In 1826 our subject was taken to Smith County, two miles from the mouth of Hickman Creek, and there reared, and received a country school education. The father was an independent farmer of ordinary education for frontier life. In June, 1846, our subject was a volunteer in the Tennessee Mounted Rifles in the Mexican war. After marching from Memphis, by Little Rock, Ark., Washington and Victoria, Tex., he arrived at Matamoras late in the fall. He was attacked by a severe case of measles at Washington but kept up with the regiment. In Mexico, although not recovered, he was given night duty by J.F. GARDNER, and in a severe norther, after standing his time, convinced that he would die if he staid on duty, he told the officer his condition, returning to camp in the face of the officer’s threats, but the next morning he was so sick he was sent to the hospital and afterward discharged. Reaching home almost dead, April 19, 1847, he has never fully recovered. Having earned his money he entered Irving College, March 11, 1848,and graduated in June, but remained until September 19, 1851. Returning home he taught ten consecutive months there, then the same at Granville Academy in Jackson County almost immediately after. Three days after the close of this he entered the Lebanon Law School, Tennessee, and thus paid his way, and after fifteen months graduated. Soon after he began to practice law at Smithville, Tenn. In 1861 he entered the Southern Army, and served as a private mostly. He was one of Jefferson Davis’ escorts from Greensboro, N.C., to Washington, Ga. He heard the statesman speak and saw much of him, and says he appeared as the great man and statesman only.

November 7, 1864, he married in Merriwether County, Ga., the beautiful and accomplished Sarah E. FAULKNER, at her grandmother, B residence, and returned to his command in seven days, and saw her no more until after he was paroled in 1865. She died May 19, 1866, at Manchester, Tenn. February 28, 1876, he married Mrs. Dora HUGGINS a native of Hanover, Germany, and whose maiden name was SHRODER. Their five children are Ada Flora, Ella Jane, Iraby Claiborn, Sally and Albert Marks. Late in the fall of 1865, he located at Manchester. January 19, 1866, at their instance, he formed a partnership at Winchester to practice law in Coffee County, with Cols. A.S. COLYER and A.S. MARKS, continuing with the latter until he was elected chancellor, and resuming with him when his governorship expired. Treated kindly by these gentlemen, he expresses gratitude to them. His practice with them has been a fair proportion of Coffee County business, while before it was moderate. He is a member of the Disciples of Christ, and a Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

CROSS, Napoleon B.

Napoleon B. Cross, farmer of Hardeman County, is a native of Madison County, born May 4, 1840, the fourth of eight children born to Richard D. and Sarah (Springfield) Cross, both natives of Chatham County, N.C. They were married in North Carolina, February 23, 1832, and in 1839 immigrated to Tennessee, settled in Madison County and lived there eleven years. In 1850 they moved to Hardeman County and settled ten miles west of Bolivar. The father was born April 7, 1809, and died in Hardeman County April 29, 1874. The mother was born May 21, 1811, and the next year after her husband’s death she moved to the home of her daughters, Emily and Eddie; the former is the widow of Thomas A. Green who died in 1872.

Napoleon B., after receiving a good education, selected farming as his occupation, and in 1868 came in possession of the old homestead, which he purchased in 1879. He owns 1,200 acres of land, and December 11, 1867, was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie Jarmon, a native of Hardeman County. To them have been born the following family: Robert D. born September 7, 1868; Napoleon R., born December 6, 1874, and John B., born April 30, 1881. In 1861 Mr. Cross enlisted in Company E, Seventh Tennessee Regiment Cavalry, was received into Gen. Forrest’s command and remained under him throughout the war, taking part in the battles of Harrisburg, Miss., Brice’s Cross-roads, Miss., Fort Pillow, Tenn., and several others. He received two wounds, one at Britton’s Lane in 1863, the other at Harrisburg in 1864. Received his honorable discharge in the spring of 1865 at Memphis. Mr. Cross is a Democrat, and although not a member of any church is in sympathy with the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his wife is a worthy member.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BLAIR, William J.

William J. BLAIR, farmer and magistrate of Hardeman County, is a native of South Carolina, born October 19, 1836, the second in a family of twelve children born to Thomas and Editha (Black) BLAIR. The parents were married in Southi Carolina about 1831 or 1832 and in 1836 immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Madison County, where they lived some time when they came to Hardeman County. The father was a native of Southi Carolina, born in 1808 of Scotch-Irish descent, and was a Democrat in politics and a farmer by occupation. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he was elder for a number of years. He died in Madison County in 1872. The mother was also a native of South Carolina and it is thought her ancestors came from Germany. She was born about the year 1810 and died in Hardeman County in 1866 a worthy member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

William J. has made farming his principal occupation in life but at one time was engaged in schoolteaching. He was reared in Madison County but in 1855 moved to McNairy County where he lived four years, when he immigrated to Rusk County, Tex., where his wife died. He remained there one year and in 1860 returned to Tennessee and in 1863 enlisted in Company C, Seventh Tennessee Regiment Mounted Infantry, under Gen. Forrest’s command and remained with him until the fall of 1864, when he was severely wounded at Collierville, Tenn. He was left near Salem. Miss., with a family named Powell who tenderly cared for him until he recovered. After a partial recovery he returned home and was immediately captured by the Federal forces and was sent as a prisoner of war to Camp Chase, Ohio, but was finally paroled at Vicksburg in the spring of 1865. He then returned home and for eight years was engaged in teaching school.

In 1870 he purchased the farm where he now hives and has been successful in acquiring a competency of this world’s goods, owning 500 acres of good land. Mr. BLAIR has been three times married. His first wife was Miss Nancy SUGGS whom he married February 8, 1854. She was a native of North Carolimia, a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and died July 18, 1860, the mother of two children. December 23, 1868, he married Miss Elizabeth STEWARD, a native of Madison County, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. She died in March, 1873. They were the parents of one daughter. October 11, the same year, Mr. BLAIR married Miss Minerva STEWARD, a sister of his second wife and to them have been born four children. He is a Democrat in politics and has served his county as deputy sheriff. Mr. and Mrs. Blair are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BLACK, Robert R.

Robert R. BLACK, farmer of Hardeema County, is a native of South Carolina, born October 10, 1831, the third of nine children born to Amos and Lucy (Foster) BLACK, both natives of South Carolina. They were married in South Carolina in about the year 1823, and in 1836 they immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Madison County, where they lived seventeen years. In 1853 they moved to Hardeman County and there spent the remainder of their days. The father was of Irish descent, born in 1804. He was a Democrat in politics, a tiller of the soil by occupation, and a prominent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and died in Hardeman County in September, 1877. The mother’s ancestors came from England; she was born about the year 1806, was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and died March 23, 1857, in Hardeman County.

Robert R. received a good education in youth and in early life began farming. At five years of age he came with his parents to Tennessee and has ever since made it his home. In 1853 he came to Hardeman County and after living at different places, in 1865 he purchased the farm where he now resides. Mr. BLACK began life poor but by close application to business, and industry and economy has secured a fair portion of this world’s goods, owning 800 acres of good land in his county, and a water grist-mill and cotton-gin on Mill Creek. May 10, 1855, he married Miss Ann E. TOONE, a native of Hardeman County, born February 5. 1839, and to them have been born six sons, five now living. Mr. BLACK is a Democrat and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

WEIR, F.H.

F. H. WEIR, an enterprising farmer of the Sixth District of Chester County, was born in Madison County, August 20, 1834, and is one of a family of eight children. His parents, S. L. and Mary WEIR, were both born in Blount County, Tenn., the father in 1793 and the mother in 1800. They came to Madison County in 1830, where he was engaged in farming until his death, in 1854. The mother died in 1834.

Our subject was reared at home and received his education at the district schools and at Bethel College. In 1858 he married Rittie CAIN, a native of Madison County, born in 1834, and the daughter of Andrew and Sarah CAIN. They have an interesting family of children. Mr. WEIR is an active energetic man and has followed agricultural pursuits the principal part of his life. In 1888 he was elected deputy sheriff, and filled that office with credit. occupying that position for about six years, to the satisfaction of all concerned. He was also elected magistrate when Chester County was organized. In the fall of 1881 he entered the Confederate Army, joining an independent company of scouts under Gen. FORREST. He served through the principal part of the war and was a brave and gallant soldier.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

TRICE, John H.

John H. TRICE, farmer and citizen of District No. 4, was born in McNairy County, November 7, 1860, and is one of two children, only our subject now living, born to the union of John H. and Susan (Anderson) TRICE. The father was born in Henderson County about 1832 and was of Scotch-English ancestry. He was married, in 1858, and settled in what is now Chester County, where he was engaged in farming. He was elected to the office of magistrate at the age of twenty-two and was holding this position at the time of his death, which occurred December 8, 1881. The mother was born in McNairy County about 1834, and is now living in Madison County. She is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. John C. TRICE, grandfather of our subject, was a native of North Carolina, born in 1804. He came to Henderson County about 1822 and located near Jacks Creek, in 1824. He is still a resident of that county.

John H., our subject, received his early education at Medon, afterward at Jackson College and finished at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. He spent several years of his early life as clerk in a mercantile house and in January, 1883, he married Lessie CAWTHORN, a native of Chester County, born in 1861,and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Her parents are John L. and Martha CAWTHORN. Mr. TRICE owns 800 acres of as fine land as is to be found in the county. He is one of the county’s most enterprising citizens and is a Democrat in politics having cast his first presidential vote for Grover CLEVELAND.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

SCARBOROUGH, C.R.

C. R. SCARBOROUGH, present chairman of the county court at Chester County, and a prominent citizen of Mifflin, is the son of Edmund and W. (Tarbutton) SCARBOROUGH, both natives of North Carolina, the father born in 1800 and the mother in 1802. They were married in 1820 and three years later came to Henderson County, and afterward immigrated from there to Madison County where they were classed among the early settlers. The father has been magistrate of Madison County for a number of years, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal. Church, and is still living. The mother was also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and died in 1884.

Our, subject was born in Henderson County in 1823, and received his education in the common schools. He spent a portion of his early life in teaching, and February,1840, married Mary J. HODGES, a native of Tennessee, born in 1824, and the daughter of Josiah and Mary HODGES, of Henderson County. Nine children were born to this union, six of whom are living: Lorenzo, W. L., William H. of Arkansas, Samuel A., Mary E. (Mrs. J. H. Wheeler), Jessie F. and Fannie L. Mr. SCARBOROUGH has been a resident of his present farm since 1857, and is the owner at nearly 400 acres of land. He began life with little or nothing, and has succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations. In 1870 he was elected to the office of magistrate and has been three times re-elected to the same office holding that position at the present time. He has for four years been chairman of the county court, the first year in Henderson County, and since then in Chester County. In 1868 he was appointed postmaster of Mifflin, which position he continues to hold to the general satisfaction of all concerned, lie is a Democrat in politics and east his first presidential vote for Gen. CASS. Mr. SCARBOROUGH is a Mason and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South together with nearly all their living children.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.