MOODY, Clement J.

CLEMENT J. MOODY, one of Bedford County’s prominent attorneys is a son of Samuel S. and Letitia (Cannon) Moody.  The father was born in Henry County, Tenn.  He was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and was a member of the general conference of 1844, when the churches divided and he adhered to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He was one of the most eminent ministers of the church and for many years was presiding elder of this district conference.  He held very prominent positions in various places.  His death occurred May 7, 1868.  The mother was a niece of Gov. Newton Cannon, and her father was one of the most prominent pioneers of this county, and gave the land whereon the town of Shelbyville was built.  She died July 24, 1880.

The subject of this sketch received a good early education, graduating at the Centre College, Kentucky, in 1865.  He then read law in Shelbyville and in 1867 graduated in the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn.  He was then admitted to the Bedford County bar and has been justly successful in the profession, ranking among the leading criminal lawyers of the State.  He was married January 18, 1881, to Miss Sally C. M. Cannon, daughter of John T. Cannon, whose sketch appears in this work.  Mr. Moody and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Moody is a Royal Arch Mason and Past Grand Master of the Shelbyville Lodge.  Politically he is a firm Democrat, and is one of the leading spirits in his party.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

TROUTT, J.M.

J. M. TROUTT, leading attorney of Henderson, Tenn., is a native Kentuckian, born in Marshall County, April 8, 1848; son of William and Isabella (Watkins) TROUTT, both natives of Marshall County, Tenn. The father was born about 1804, and moved to Kentucky about 1840. He served for many years both as constable and deputy sheriff. He was also engaged in agricultural pursuits in which he was quite successful. He died about 1857. The mother was born about the same year as her husband and is now living with her son, Dr. J. R. TROUTT, at Clear Springs, Ky. Our subject was educated at the McKenzie College, and also at Bethel Co1lege but subsequently attended Princeton College, Kentucky. In 1871 and 1872 Mr. Troutt read law under Judge McCAMPBELL of Paris, and was admitted to the bar about 1874; after which he practiced at Dresden until 1880. He then came to Henderson where he has since remained. He is an able practitioner and has built up an extensive practice. He was one of the leaders in organizing Chester County after the act was passed setting it aside as an independent county.

In 1874 Mr. TROUTT married Emma TRAVIS, a native of Henry County, Tenn., born in 1850, and the daughter of Dr. Joseph TRAVIS. She died in 1876. December, 1877, he married R. PROVINCE, a native of McKenzie, Tenn., born in 1852 and the daughter of Andrew and Mary PROVINCE. To this union was born one child, James McCord, Mr. TROUTT is a Democrat in politics, an excellent citizen and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. TROUTT is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1804 he enlisted in Company G, Third Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Confederate Army, and participated in many important battles. He was captured at Selma, Ala,, paroled at Montgomery and returned home in 1865.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

STOFLE, Robert M.

Robert M. Stofle, was born in Weakley County, Tenn., April 16, 1850, and is one of two sons and eight daughters, surviving members of a family of twelve children born to Thomas and Frances (Hoggard) Stofle. His father was of Henry County and his mother of Weakley County, Tenn. They were married in 1849, and engaged in farming in Henry County until his death in 1885. His mother still lives in Weakley County.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was twenty-three years old, and October 9, 1873, married Johanna Johnson. Three children have been the issue of this union: John Thomas, deceased; William and Robert. In 1874 Mr. Stofle was elected constable of his district, in Weakley County, serving four years; he then removed to McKenzie, Tenn., and engaged in the mercantile business, under the firm name of Gilbert, Stofle & Co., which copartnership was continued three years, when he embarked in the livery and live stock trade, which he still continues, supplying McKenzie with first-class livery stock, carriages, buggies, etc.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

MOORE, J.D.

J. D. Moore, an enterprising farmer, was born in North Carolina in 1840, son of A. W. and Nancy Moore. The father was born in North Carolina in 1813, and followed the occupation of an overseer. In the spring of 1844 he came to Tennessee and located in Carroll County. He died in 1852. The mother was also a native of North Carolina and a few years younger than her husband. She died in 1844.

Our subject was reared by his grandmother Moore, received his education in the schools near home and at the Caledonia Institute, Henry County. April, 1866, he married Mary Townes, who was born in 1843, and who died in 1873, leaving four children: Stephen H., James A., Robert S. and Mary A. In 1874 Mr. Moore married Mrs. Mattie A. Henderson, who was born in 1841. By this union they had three children: Eliza B., A. R. and Dennis V. In 1872 Mr. Moore located at the place where he is now residing. He owns 100 acres of excellent land, situated two miles southwest of Lavinia. He is a Democrat in politics, a Mason, and he and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

HUMBLE, G.W.

G. W. Humble, judge of Carroll County, Tenn., was born in Henry County, September 20, 1827, son of Jacob and Jane (Nesbitt) Humble, and is of Dutch-Irish lineage. His father was born in Georgia in 1798 and his mother in Middle Tennessee in 1806. His paternal grandfather, George Humble, was a North Carolinian born about 1772. He died in Middle Tennessee in 1827. He was a soldier in the war of 1812 and participated in the battle of New Orleans. Jacob Humble came to West Tennessee in 1822 and was the second man who was married in Carroll County, the event occurring in July, 1822. He resided in Henry County from 1823 until 1831 and at the latter date came to Carroll County. He died in Huntingdon in 1884, his wife dying in 1864.

G. W. Humble is the younger of two children and was reared on a farm. He received a common school education and at an early day engaged in farming, continuing until 1874, when he moved to Huntingdon and here has since resided. Politically he was formerly an old line Whig. He was a Union man during the war and since that time has been identified with the Republican party. In 1860 he was elected justice of the peace and has since been an incumbent of that office. In 1872 he was elected judge of Carroll County and served by re-election up to the present time. December 28, 1853, he married Caroline Pinson, who was born August 21, 1837. They have one child—Benjamin. Mr. Humble is a Mason and a prominent old citizen of West Tennessee.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

GILBERT Sr., J.M.

Hon. J. M. Gilbert, Sr., was born in Hancock County, Ga., June 17, 1800, and is the only surviving member of a family of four sons and five daughters born to Benjamin and Amelia (McKenzie) Gilbert, both of whom were of Virginia, where they were married, and directly after moved to Georgia and raised their family there, and followed farming until 1811, then moved to Livingston County, Ky., continuing farming until 1826, then moved to Weakley County, Tenn., where they died.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was twenty years old, and was appointed constable at the early age of nineteen, and at twenty was appointed deputy sheriff of same county. October 9, 1821, he married Frances W. Busey, of Kentucky; they followed farming there until 1823, when they moved to Carroll County, locating near the present site of McKenzie. The whole county at that time was barrens, covered with wild grass, there being then but very few families in the county. He began farming, and was one of the pioneer farmers of the county. About 1834 he, with several others, made the old Paris and Huntingdon road. He built the first house on the present site of McKenzie, but the town did not commence building until many years afterward. Mr. Gilbert knows of but three men living who were in Weakley, Carroll and Henry Counties at the time he came. They are William Hamilton, Reuben Edmonson, and Tilman Johnson, all of Weakley County. He was engaged in the commission business at Memphis in 1867-69, and during the same time was engaged in the mercantile business in Weakley County. The town of McKenzie began to build in 1857, at the building of the Louisville Railroad.

Mr. Gilbert was coroner of Henry County about 1876. Although temporarily out of the county a few months at a time, he has made his permanent home in Carroll County since first settling there. From his marriage with Miss Busey he had four sons and five daughters, five of the latter and two of the former are now living; their mother died July 4, 1867, and in 1870 Mr. Gilbert married Mrs. Louisa Dumas who is still living. In 1885 Mr. Gilbert was elected mayor of McKenzie, and still fills the office. During the first of the war he was employed by the Confederate Government to furnish labor and provender until the evacuation of Columbus. He then went to Texas, where he remained until the close of the war. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, also of the F. & A. M., of which he is Knight Templar, and has filled all of the prominent state offices of the fraternity.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

CURTIS, W.E.

Dr. W. E. Curtis, was born March 27, 1833, in Henry County, Tenn., and is one of seven children born to John and Sarah (Sessams) Curtis, two daughters and our subject being the present surviving members of the family. The father was born in North Carolina, moved to Humphreys County, Tenn., when young, married there, then moved to Marengo County, Ala., about 1815, remained there engaged in farming two years, then moved to Stewart County, Tenn., and in 1826 to Henry County, being one of the early settlers in both counties. He resided in Henry County, farming, till his death in 1872. His wife died in 1854.

Our subject remained with his parents until he attained his majority, then accepted a clerkship in a store at Paris, Henry Co., Tenn., remaining there until 1856, when he embarked in the drag business at the same place, which he continued a few years, when he commenced the study of medicine, attending the medical university at Nashville, during the sessions of 1859-61, and graduated. He began the practice of medicine in Carroll County, locating at McKenzie in 1878. During the war he was surgeon in 1861. Dr. Curtis married Harriet Looney, daughter of Dr. J. D. Looney, now deceased. From this union were born two daughters: Harriet Ella, and Alice, both living. Their mother died in 1865, and in 1866 Dr. Curtis married Ann E. Carson; from this marriage resulted these children: two sons and a daughter—John William, Lillian Howard and Thos. C., deceased. On Dr. Curtis’ father’s old place in Henry County is a very large Indian mound forming a perfect square and containing one and a half acres; the elevation is about seven feet and is used as a building site. The Doctor has two farms in Carroll County of 100 acres each; on one is located a grist-mill; also has a residence in McKenzie. He and his family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is also a member of the F. & A. M.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

CANON, E.M.

E. M. Canon, citizen and farmer of the Twenty-first District, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., June 1, 1826, and is one of eight children, five of whom are living, born to John and Elizabeth (Dickson) Canon. The father was born in 1791, in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee when eleven years of age, located in Rutherford County, was married, and in 1832 went to Henry County, and five years later came to Carroll County; he followed agricultural pursuits, and died January 5, 1865. The mother was born in North Carolina in 1794, and died September 1, 1874.

Our subject received a good practical education in the country schools, and in the year 1849 wedded Elizabeth Hamilton, a native of Carroll County, born in 1823, and the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Hamilton. The father of Mrs. Canon was born near Nashville, Tenn., about the year 1787, in the blockhouse, which was a protection against the Indians at that early day. He came to Carroll County about 1822, and died at the advanced age of ninety years, three months and eighteen days. The mother was born in North Carolina about two years after the birth of her husband; she died when about sixty years of age.

To our subject and wife were born five children: R. F., a merchant at Atwood; T. W., a Cumberland Presbyterian minister, and a resident of McKenzie; Emma E. (deceased), J. M. (deceased), and A. H., a farmer, residing with his father. In 1856 Mr. Canon located where he is now residing, on an excellent farm of 184 acres. He has been a life-long Republican in politics, and he and wife and entire family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he has been an elder for nearly thirty years.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.