FARRIS, J.K.

J.K. FARRIS, M.D., a prominent physician of Coffee County, was born in Franklin County in 1836. His parents, William C. and Mahaley (Kennerly) FARRIS, were natives of Franklin County, the latter, daughter of J.P. KENNERLY, of Georgia. The father was a shoe-maker, and came to Tennessee in 1811.

Our subject married Mary E. AUSTELL in 1857, whose parents were natives of North Carolina. They have had eight children: Ellen K. (deceased), born in 1858; Samuel J., in 1860; John K., in 1865; Annas A. (deceased), in 1868; William R., in 1870; Sue J., in 1873; Mary E., in 1885, and Sophia C. (deceased), in 1878. His wife died in 1885. Reared on the farm and with an academic training, he began the study of medicine under Dr. J.E. HOUGH, of Pleasant Hill. After practicing in Arkansas, he came to Coffee County in 1861, where he has built up his present extensive practice. A self-made man, he has given his children collegiate training.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

FARISS, William M.

William M. FARISS, M.D., a leading citizen and physician of Tullahoma, Tenn., was born in Franklin County, Tenn., April 22,1834,and is the son of William and Martha (Clardy) FARISS, natives of South Carolina. The father died in 1861 and the mother in 1874. Both were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Our subject was brought up on the farm and attended the public schools. In 1854 he began the study of medicine at Winchester, with Dr. Wallace ESTILL as preceptor. Later he attended several courses of lectures, and in March, 1858, graduated from the medical department of the University of Nashville. He at once began practicing in Franklin County, Tenn., and continued until he entered the Confederate Army, joining Company D, of Turney’s First Regiment of Tennessee Infantry as private. He was appointed assistant surgeon and assigned duty with the Fifth Alabama Battalion. Subsequently he was elected first lieutenant of his old company with which he continued during the war. At the battle of Gettysburg he was seriously wounded in the thigh, captured and held as prisoner for twenty-one months.

After the war he returned to his old home and took care of his aged mother, practicing his profession. In 1869 he removed to Tullahoma to practice where he has resided ever since, and built up a large and lucrative practice. October 17, 1967, our subject was married to Amanda M., daughter of C.J. TAYLOR of Franklin County, Tenn., and to them have been born nine children, two of whom are dead. Our subject and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is a member of the I.O.O.F., F. & A.M., and A.O.U.W. lodges. Politically he is a Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

DEWEY, H.P.

H.P. DEWEY, lumber dealer, and a prominent citizen of Tullahoma, was born in Michigan in 1838, and is the son of Cyrus J. and Maria (Beulah) DEWEY, natives of the Green Mountain State. The father was born in 1812 and died in 1864, and the  mother was born in 1813 and died in 1858. Both were members of the Old School Presbyterian Church.

Our subject was raised in Washington County, Mich., and educated in the public schools and at Monroe College, Mich. He farmed and attended school alternately until the fall of 1862; he became a member of Company H, Eighteenth Regiment Michigan Infantry, and served until honorably discharged in June, 1865. He then spent a year in Iowa at general merchandising. He returned to Michigan in 1867, and after a year’s farming, engaged in steam saw-milling. In 1874 the firm removed their mill to Franklin County, Tenn., six miles below Winchester.

In 1880 he was appointed United States gauger in the revenue department, and in 1881 came to Tullahoma. He engaged in his present business in the spring of 1886. Mr. DEWEY was married January 16, 1866, to Minnie E., daughter of Nathaniel GARDNER, of Coldwater, Mich., she being born in 1849. Their two children are Lillie E., born October, 1867, and Eddie L., born November, 1869. He was elected alderman in 1885, receiving 328 out of 368 votes cast. He is a Conservative Republican. Our subject, wife and daughter, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he being a trustee and his wife class teacher of the same.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

LIPSCOMB, Thomas (Dr.)

DR. THOMAS LIPSCOMB, one of Bedford County’s oldest and best citizens, was born in Louisa County, Va., July 22, 1808, to the marriage of William Lipscomb and Ann Day Cook, natives of Spottsylvania and Louisa Counties, Va., respectively.  The father was killed by a falling tree in January, 1829, having been a farmer.  The mother attained the ripe age of ninety years, and her old age was marked with great vitality.  With her own hands she knit over 100 pairs of socks for the Confederate soldiers after she had passed eighty years of age.  She lived nearly forty years a widow.

The subject of this sketch was reared with his parents on a farm, and received a common school education.  At the age of twenty-one he went to Winchester, Tenn., and began the study of medicine.  Thence he attended the Medical University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, whither he proceeded and returned the most of the way on horseback.  After one course of lectures he returned to Franklin County, Tenn., where his parents had moved in 1826.

In 1831 he came to Shelbyville, where he has spent a lifetime in the practice of medicine, surgery and obstetrics, and has attained eminence in his profession.  He has been president of the Medical Society of Tennessee, of the Bedford County Medical Society and of the Female Institute at Shelbyville.  Since entering into the practice of his profession the honorary title of M. D. has been conferred upon him by the University of Louisville and by the University of Tennessee.  He has been successful financially.  Since 1855 he has carried on farming.  He is the president and largest stockholder of the Victor Mills, of Shelbyville, and was the president of the Branch Bank of Tennessee at Shelbyville at the opening of the war.  The advancement of the schools and churches is due greatly to him.  For two years he held the Shelbyville post office, the emoluments of which he allowed to the widow of a former postmaster.  He is not now actively engaged in the practice, but at the age of seventy-three he successfully performed the difficult ovariotomy operation for the first time in his life.

He was married, May 22, 1832, to Rebecca Stevenson, who bore him ten children, all of whom were raised.  This wife died December 6, 1880, and he then wedded, October 26, 1882, Miss Mary A. Cowan.  Dr. Lipscomb and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, as was his first wife.  Politically he is a Democrat, and wields large influence as a worthy citizen of the county.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

FARIS, W.L.

W. L. FARIS, a native of Franklin County, Tenn., was born June 17, 1864, son of G. W. and Eliza (Tucker) Faris. The father was also a native of Franklin County, and died June 5, 1882. The mother was born about 1838 in Bedford County. Our subject assisted his parents on the farm until he was about twenty-two years of age, after which he worked for himself at farming. At the end of three years he began the mechanics trade in connection with farming and still follows that business up to the present date.

December 21, 1875, he wedded Amanda R. Kirk, of this county, who was born August 3, 1856. She was the daughter of Edwin Kirk, who was born in 1809, and died November 22, 1883. To our subject and wife were born five children: E. E., Julian L., Lee G., S. I., and Cassie B. Mr. Fairs is a self-made man, having made his property by his own unaided efforts, and is consequently a good substantial citizen. He and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Democrat in politics.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

MANNING, T.B.

T. B. Manning, farmer, of the First District, was born in Carroll County, Tenn., in 1840, and is one of a family of three children, he being the only surviving one. His parents, Alfred and B. Manning, were both natives of North Carolina, the former born in 1805, and the latter in 1807. The father came to Tennessee at an early day, and settled in the middle part of the State, where he remained a short time. He then came to Carroll County, and remained there until his death in 1856. The mother died in the fall of 1877.

Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and received his education in the schools in his neighborhood. In 1869 he married Martha, daughter of Abraham and Pernelia McLemore, and a native of Franklin County, Tenn., born in 1847. This union resulted in the birth of seven children: Pernelia, Alfred, Lucy, Mike, Beulah, William and Thomas Edward. After marriage Mr. Manning located on the old home place, and began tilling the soil, an occupation he has since followed. In 1882 he located where he now lives, two miles west of Lavinia, and has been quite successful in business. He is one of the county’s best men and a Republican in politics.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.