DOUGLAS, J.E.

J. E. DOUGLAS, a resident and farmer of the Second District, was born in 1829 in Wilson County, and is the son of Hon. Burchett Douglass, who was born October 6, 1793, and died July 31, 1849. He was one of the prominent politicians of his day; was a member of the Whig party, which he represented a number of times in the State Legislature, and was at one time speaker of the House. He was a very popular man, and during twenty years of public life never was defeated, and for many years he was president of the m\bank of Somerville, Fayette County.

Our subject’s mother was Martha McGEE, born in Wilson County; she was the daughter of Rev. John McGee. As his father was engaged so much in politics, J. E. Douglass remained on the farm until twenty-four years of age; he then went to Mississippi and farmed two years, when he returned and remained with his father until he died, when he bought a steam, grist and saw-mill near Memphis, which he ran until 1859, then came to his present farm, thirteen miles southwest of Brownsville, and three miles west of Dancyville, and engaged in the mill business, which he still continues.

Mr. Douglass was first married, in 1859, to Sarah F. PEWETT. The three children born to this marriage are dead. March 8, 1868, he married Mrs. Martha Phillips, a widow with one son — David C. Phillips. By this marriage were two children: Lena Lee, born in 1871, and Willis B., born in 1873. Dr. Douglass is a man trusted and esteemed by all, and is one of the most substantial citizens and business men of his county. In politics he is a Democrat.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

CALDWELL, Robert

Robert CALDWELL, one of the influential farmers of long standing, of the Second district, is a native of Lincoln County, and was born October 25, 1822, and is the son of Alex Caldwell, who was born in 186, and died in Tipton County, in 1842.  The mother was Elizabeth NICHOLLS Caldwell, who died when our subject was quite an infant.

Robert Caldwell is of Irish descent; he was raised on a farm, and worker for wages until the date of the war; since then he has farmed for himself, and has accumulated quite a nice property, having commenced with no means. February 6, 1844, he married Nancy S. HARGIS of Fayette County; they have no children.  Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is an enthusiastic Democrat.  He takes a deep interest in all pertaining to the welfare of the county, and whenever he is called upon to contribute to any public enterprise, responds freely.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BRIGHT, Aaron D. (Judge)

Judge Aaron D. BRIGHT, attorney at law, of Brownsville, Tenn., was born in Hinds County, Miss, August 10, 1838, son of Aaron D., and Mary G. (WILLIAMS) Bright, natives of North Carolina. The father came to Haywood County, Tenn., in 1832, and located on a farm five miles southeast of Brownsville. In 1836, he removed to Mississippi, where he died in 1840. His widow then returned to Haywood county, where she has since resided.

Our subject was educated Emory and Henry College in Virginia, and East Tennessee University at Knoxville. He left the later institution in 1860, and upon the breaking out of the war, enlisted in the army of Northern Virginia, and serving one year, joined the cavalry service as provost-marshal, serving thus with the rank of captain until the surrender. Previous to the war, he had studied law and engaged in the practice of his profession after his return home. In May, 1883, he was appointed to a position on the referee county, at Jackson, Tenn., and filled that position ably for two years.

October 24, 1867, he married Miss Adelaide R. RIVES, of Fayette County, Tenn., and by her is the father of three sons and two daughters: Prentiss, Aaron D., Mary and Lillie, and Henry Livingston (deceased). Judge Bright is a Democrat in politics and a member of the A. O. U. W., and G. R. fraternities. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he has been an officer of the church and chairman of the board on finance of the Memphis conference for a number of years.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

DURDEN, Wiley

Wiley Durden, a resident and merchant of Saulsbury, was born March 28, 1836, in North Carolina, of which State his parents were natives. They were William and Elizabeth (Sauls) Durden. The father was born in 1806 and immigrated to Tennessee in 1837, locating in Hardeman County, where he resided until his death, February 12, 1855. The mother was born in 1797, and died August 22, 1854.

Our subject was raised on a farm, upon which he worked until 1859, when he obtained a situation as salesman for J. M. Richardson, in the merchandise business, remaining in the position until the late war. He entered the Confederate service in 1863, in Col. J. C. Neely’s regiment. In 1864 he returned home and became clerk for McCullen & Bostwick. In 1867 he and R. M. Wright bought out the firm for which he had been working. The new firm was styled Wright, Cox & Co., changed in 1868 to Wright & Durden and, with the exception of one year, has so continued. They are now among the leading and most prosperous merchants of the place. having, by their fair dealing and courtesy to patrons, built up a large and profitable trade.

Mr. Durden was married, November 15, 1870, to M. E. Tucker, of Somerville, Tenn. Their union has been blessed within two children: Edward Tucker and Willie Gwynne. Mr. Durden is highly respected by the entire community, and known as a man of fine business capacity, enterprise and honor. He began life at the close of the war without a cent, and is now the owner of some valuable property and considerable means. He is a stanch Democrat.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

DOWDY, G.W.

G. W. Dowdy, a member of the firm of Dowdy & Cargile, of Saulsbury, was born in August, 1842. His parents were B. F. and Susan (Akin) Dowdy. The father was born in Virginia, July 8, 1816, and immigrated to Tennessee about 1836, locating at La Grange, Fayette County. He was married February 12, 1839, to Miss Akin, who was born in North Carolina November 8, 1824. Her death occurred April 27, 1880, her husband dying December 31 of same year.

The subject of this sketch is of Scotch-Irish descent. He attended the Woodland Academy until the outbreak of the late war. He entered the Confederate service, in Company K of the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Regiment Infantry. At Murfreesboro he received a shot on the top of the head. It was the only serious wound he had during his gallant and faithful service. After the surrender he returned home and engaged as salesman. In 1872 he and his present partner established a general merchandise business at this place, since which time they have been exceedingly prosperous. Mr. Dowdy is an honorable, enterprising and substantial citizen, who has accumulated his possessions by hard work and economy. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and treasurer of the K. of H., and a stanch, earnest Democrat.

In May, 1866, he was wedded to Miss Sallie E. Whitlow. Their union resulted in the birth of Theodore, Nicholas, Frank, Ernest, Julius, Joe, Laurie and Mary Susan. Mrs. Dowdy is of an old and highly respected family. Her father, Nicholas (Cowan) Whitlow, was born in Limestone County, Ala., near Athens, September 28, 1821 — a son of Jesse and Sarah (Cowan) Whitlow, married in 1820 in Alabama. Mr. and Mrs. Whithow were married in Tippah County, Miss., July 23, 1844. They had a family of four sons and six daughters. Dr. Whitlow, who was for thirty-three years a practicing physician, died June 8, 1877, and his widow departed this life, July 17, 1881.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

CLARK, Roger S.

Roger S. Clark, a resident and prosperous merchant of Saulsbury, was born July 22, 1849, in Hardeman County. His parents were Jackson and Sallie (Lyle) Clark. The father was born January, 1824, in Alabama, and immigrated to Tennessee at an early day, locating near Saulsbury, where he resided until his death, which occurred December 8, 1857. The mother was born April 15, 1824, in North Carolina. She is beloved by all who know her and is still living with her son, our subject. The grandfather, Cornelius Clark, was born in 1763, and is supposed to have left Scotland and settled in Georgia when a comparatively young man. He took a prominent part in the war of 1812. The exact position he held is not known, but was evidently an officer of high rank. He died in Alabama. The grandfather Lyle was of Irish descent, a native of North Carolina, born in 1800, and came to Tennessee in 1826, locating in Hardeman County, where he lived a number of years. He died in Fayette County, July 22, 1885.

Roger was a mere child when bereft of his father. He remained with his mother until 1870, when he went west. He traveled most of the time, visiting nearly all the Westem States, and returned home January, 1873. The next five years he was salesman for different firms, and in 1878 engaged in merchandise business for himself, in which line has been very successful. Since 1875 he has had charge of the postoffice, and was appointed postmaster in 1877. He began life without capital, but by untiring energy and judicious management is now in easy circumstances, having accumulated considerable means and property. He is a respected member of the Missionary Baptist Church, of the Masonic order, the K. & L. of H. He is a true Democrat. November 5, 1874, Mr. Clark was united in marriage with Miss Sarah E., daughter of W. W. Elliotte. Their union resulted in the birth of five children, two of whom are living: Pear T. and Jewel E.

BLALOCK, Jesse

Jesse BLALOCK, planter, of Hardeman County, is a native of Granville County, N.C., born October 5, 1814, son of William and Katie (Cash) BLALOCK. The parents were natives of North Carolina, and there lived and died both in the same year. When Jesse was an infant he was left with strangers, but through his own efforts secured a good practical education, and was bound out to J. W. PHILPOTT, who died before our subject reached his majority, and not receiving any compensation for all his years of hard work Mr. BLALOCK was left with nothing but an honest heart and name, and an ambition that prompted him to industry and labor.

In May, 1833, he married Miss Rosana LEE, a native of North Carolina, born October 5, 1812. This was a happy union for forty years and the wife died October 5, 1873. In 1836 Mr. BLALOCK purchased a little farm near where he now lives, where he remained a short time, then moved to Fayette County, near New Castle, where he lived a short time and after living in different places until December, 1850, he then moved where he now lives, twelve miles west of Bolivar. He now owns 500 acres of good land under a good state of cultivation. To his first marriage ten children were born, nine of whom lived to be grown. July 21, 1874, he married for his second wife Miss Bettie HUDSON, a native of Hardeman County, born May 20, 1850, and to them have been born two daughters: Pauline, born August 31, 1875, and died September 30, 1877, and Annie May, born November 19, 1877. In politics Mr. BLALOCK is a stanch Democrat, and he and wife are prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and to the interest of which he is a very liberal contributor.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

BAIRD, Washington L.

Washington L. BAIRD, M. D., is a prominent physician of Hickory Valley, a native of Fayette County, Tenn., born April 16, 1839, the sixth of eight children born to Capt. Charles and Nancy T. (Robards) BAIRD, who were both of Scotch-Irish descent The father was a native of North Carolina, born July 16, 1797, and in early life came with his parents to Robertson County, Tenn. He was a Democrat in politics, for a number of years was captain of the State militia and a member of Primitive Baptist Church. His death occurred in Fayette County February 11, 1871. The mother was a native of Tennessee, born March 7. 1807; she was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church and died in Fayette County, September 17, 1867.

Washington L. received a good education in youth and having selected the medical profession, attended lectures at the Memphis Medical College, In 1860 he began the practice of his profession with an elder brother in Dallas County, Ark., remaining there one year, when he returned to Tennessee and began practicing in Springfield. September 26, 1861, Dr. Baird married Miss Callie V. CUNNINGHAM, a native of Davidson County, born in 1842, and to them have been born six children, one son deceased. In the spring of 1862 he moved to Dallas County, Ark., where he practiced medicine until the fall of 1863 when he enlisted as a private of volunteers and remained with Maj. Gen. HOLMES one year. The entire company to which he belonged was captured, but he escaped capture while on duty as quartermaster. He then came to Tennessee and joined Gen. Forrest and remained with him until the close of the war. He then returned to Fayette County, remaining a short time with his father; then returned to Arkansas, for two years; then returned to Tennessee and after practicing at different points, settled in Hickory Valley where he has since remained. Dr. BAIRD has two married sisters whose husbands are distinguished men: Lamiza A., whose husband is Judge Joseph C. STARKOF Springfield, Robertson County, and Emma H., whose husband is Louis T. COBB, now a member of the State Legislature and represents the Twelfth Senatorial District. Dr. BAIRD is a Democrat in politics and a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church which he has served as recording steward seven years.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee: From the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Fayette and Hardeman Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

JOHNSON, Hiram

Hiram JOHNSON, an old resident and magistrate of the Sixth District, was born in Moore County, N. C., May 2, 1824, and is one of a family of twelve children, seven of whom are living. His parents, Joseph and Christina (McCollum) JOHNSON, were both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in 1774 and came to West Tennessee in 1823, locating in Madison County. He was a farmer by occupation, and was a magistrate in the First District of Madison County for some years. After living there twelve years he moved to McNairy County, where he died June 24, 1858. The mother was a few years younger than her husband, and died about 1830.

Our subject received his education in the common schools, and August 15, 1855, he married Bettie McCLEOD, a native of Somerville, Tenn., born January 24, 1834, and a daughter of Dickson C. and Martha M. McCLEOD. To them were born four children: Joseph D., Hiram H., Maggie and Marvin. Mr. JOHNSON has always followed agricultural pursuits, and has lived on the farm that he now owns, with the exception of a few years, when he moved to town for the purpose of educating his children. In March, 1853, be was elected magistrate and has performed the duties of that office ever since; to the evident satisfaction of all. He is a Democrat in politics but cast his first presidential vote for Z. Taylor. He is a Mason, a member of the I. O. O. F, and he and Mrs. JOHNSON are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.