HAYWOOD, James G.

James G. Haywood, M. D., of Brownsville, Tenn., was born in Davidson County, Tenn., June 1, 1826, being a son of Thomas and Susan (Glasgow) Haywood, and a grandson of the gifted Judge John Haywood. Our subject’s parents were both natives of North Carolina.

James G. was reared in his native county until his fifteenth year, when he went to New Orleans and engaged as clerk in the mercantile business. He received a good literary education from his father in youthful days. In 1845 he came to Brownsville and began the study of medicine under his uncle, Dr. Egbert Haywood, and later attended the medical department of the University of Louisville, where he took a course of lectures. In 1847 he engaged in the practice of his profession in this county at Woodville. One year later he became a partner with Dr. A. J. Barbee in the county, and in 1850 engaged in practice in Brownsville, but some two or three years later removed to the country and did not return to town until 1867, since which time he has been engaged continuously in practice here, having acquired a large and lucrative practice and met with more than ordinary and well deserved success – In 1862 the Doctor raised a company of Cavalry from this and Lauderdale Counties and participated in the late war as captain of Company M, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, from the spring of 1862 to January, 1863.

January 30, 1856, the Doctor married Miss Harriett B. Read, a native of North Carolina, who died January 25, 1871. To them were born eight children, four now living: Mary G., the wife of H. M. Stone, of this county; James G., a practicing physician in Dakota, being in the employ of the United States Government; Alfred R., a graduate of the Memphis Hospital Medical College and a partner of his father, and Wm. Henry.

Dr. Haywood was a Democrat in politics, before and since the war, but belonged to the Douglas faction of the party before the war, and was strongly opposed to the war of the States, but after that sanguinary struggle came on, naturally espoused the Southern cause. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which faith his wife died. Dr. Haywood has always taken an active part and interest in laudable public and private enterprises of the county; is an ancient Mason and justly recognized as an enterprising and reliable citizen of the county, and a medical practitioner of experience and ability.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

HAYWOOD, John

John Haywood, M. D., a retired physician of Haywood County, was born in Madison County, Ala., April 7, 1820, and was the son of Thomas J. and Susan C. (Glasgow) Haywood. His father was born in Orange County, N. C., in 1797, and in early life came with his parents to Davidson County, Tenn., and in a few years moved to Madison County, Ala., but in four years returned to Davidson County, where he died in December, 1868. The mother was a native of East Tennessee, born in 1799 and died in 1884. She was a woman of fine intelligence, and had received good advantages. Our subject came of an illustrious family; his father and grandfather were both lawyers of great fame; his father assisted Hon. Robert L. Cobb in the first revision of the statutes of Tennessee, and his grandfather, Judge John Haywood, was at one time one of the judges of the supreme court of Tennessee.

Our subject is the second of eleven children. After completing his collegiate education he went, in 1843, to the medical university of New York. After finishing the course he returned home and commenced the practice of medicine, but in two years moved to Haywood County, where he established a very extensive practice and was Recognized as one of the most able physicians in West Tennessee. Dr. Haywood also practiced several years in Brownsville, and did faithful service during the fearful scourge of yellow fever there in 1878. June 25, 1879, he married Mrs. Elizabeth Boyce, whose maiden name was Reid. She died in 1883. Dr. Haywood is a Democrat and is well known as one over the county and state. He is said to be the best informed man in constitutional law in the county, and has written several able articles on the subject for the press. He is not a member of any church, but inclines to the Episcopalian.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

HALLIBURTON, A.J. (Major)

Maj. A. J. Halliburton, a farmer and valuable citizen of the Tenth District, was born in Humphreys County, in 1814, being one of two children born to Charles A. and Jerusha Halliburton. His grandfather was born in North Carolina in l747, and lived to be seventy-three years old; he was a major in the war of 1812. The father was born in North Carolina, July, 1793; his parents came to Nashville in 1796, then moved to Dickson County, then to Humphreys; he was also in the war of 1812 and died shortly after the battle of New Orleans, March 6, 1815. A. J. Halliburton’s mother was born in Wake County, North Carolina, in 1795, and died October 16, 1882.

Maj. Halliburton married Nancy J., daughter of F. C. and Laura (Duke) Wells. She was born in Kentucky in 1827. They have lived on their present farm since 1848, Maj. Halliburton owning 740 acres of well improved land. In early manhood he taught school for ten years; he is a man of fine business capacity and has met with marked success, and is regarded as a valuable citizen of the county. He held the office of constable until he resigned, and belongs to the Masons and the I. O. O. F., and with his wife belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church. He has been a member of the church at Woodville for forty-nine years.


Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

SMITH, Joel B.

Joel B. SMITH, a pioneer of Tullahoma, was born in Nashville, Tenn., September 12, 1829, and is the son of Joel M. and Charlotte (Bateman) SMITH. The father was a native of North Carolina, born in 1797, and died in 1861. He was treasurer of Nashville, and United States pension agent, appointed to that office by President VAN BUREN. He was also proprietor of the Nashville Union, the pioneer newspaper of the capital city. The mother was also born in Nashville in 1805, the daughter of Henry BATEMAN, an early settler of Nashville; she  died in 1876. Both were members of McKendree Methodist Episcopal Church of Nashville.

Our subject was reared in Nashville, and educated by Prof. Alfred HUME. When twenty-one years of age our subject entered the pension office of his father, buying and selling land warrants. In 1852 he was sent to Tullahoma as agent for the Nashville & Chattanooga Railway Company. After two years here he began speculating in wheat, and became proprietor of the Lincoln House and Tullahoma Hotel. During the war he was special aid-de-camp on Gov. HARRIS’ staff, and for a while, occupied a similar position on the staff of Gen. BRAGG. After the war he continued the hotel business until 1872, when he engaged in business with James G. AYDELOTT for eight years. At present he is bookkeeper and financial agent of the Tullahoma planing and saw mills. Our subject was married to Bettie YELL, daughter of Gov. Archibald YELL, the first governor of Arkansas, who was killed at the battle of Buena Vista, Mexico. She was born in Fayetteville, Tenn., in July, 1832.

They have had eight children: William H., Archibald Y., Joel M., Frank K., Clinton, Lawson M., Lotta R. and Anna V. Our subject was the last mayor of Tullahoma before the war, and the first elected after the conflict, and has served several terms as alderman. He is a member of the Masonic order, and he and his wife both are members of the Episcopal Church. His son, Archibald J. SMITH, is agent of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway at Tullahoma, a director of the First National Bank of the city, and is one of the progressive and enterprising young citizens.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

MILLER, F.N.

F.N. MILLER, editor of the Manchester Times and a prominent citizen of Manchester, was born at Port Hudson, La., on December 5, 1853, the son of Albert and Delilah (Saunders) MILLER, the former born October 18, 1822, in Indiana, and the latter May 1, 1832, in Kentucky, and still living in Port Hudson, La. The parents were married about 1846. In 1861 the elder MILLER enlisted in the Confederate Company E, Twenty-first Mississippi Regiment Infantry, and was killed in the battle of Chickamauga in 1863. He was a successful brick-mason.

Our subject is the third of five children, and after a good academical education he served an apprenticeship as printer at Woodville, Miss., for four years. In 1869 he made a nine year’s tour of western cities, working in Texas, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kentucky and Nebraska. Returning to Tennessee in 1879 he spent a year in Union City, and then bought a half interest in a journal called Our Country in Dresden. A year later he went to Nashville and entered the Banner office, and in 1881 came to Manchester and established the Times, which, through his constant attention and ability, has become recognized as one of the leading Democratic journals in this section of the country. Published at $1 per year, it has a circulation of 600.

December 14, 1880, our subject was married to Alice J. CASTLEMAN, born March 16, 1856, in Weakley County, Tenn. She is a lady of intelligence and culture. The two children who were born to them (both daughters) died in infancy. Mr. MILLER is a stanch Democrat and the columns of the Times are made to mirror his political faith. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while his wife is a Missionary Baptist. He is United States commissioner of the middle district of Tennessee.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

McLEMORE, S.J.

S.J. McLEMORE, a pioneer of Tullahoma, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., December 29, 1822, and is the son of S.J. and Martha (Whitaker) McLEMORE, natives of North Carolina. The father died in 1825 and the mother in 1880. Our subject reared on the farm, remained there until his marriage to Margaret J. WARD in 1841, when he removed to Nashville and entered the produce business.

In 1851 he came to Tullahoma. He sold goods until the civil war and after the close of the same entered the livery business. In 1876 he began merchandising, continuing at that until January, 1886. His wife died in 1881. In 1883 he married Ruthea J. GROSS, a native of McMinnville. By his first wife our subject has six children: William H., John C., S.J., Lamyra, Henrietta and Laura. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and his wife of the Christian Church. He is a member of Tullahoma Lodge, No. 101, I.O.O.F., of which he is the only surviving charter member. He has served several times as mayor and alderman of Tullahoma. He is a Democrat.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

ISBELL, P.C.

P.C. ISBELL. His parents were both born in Warren County, Ky. His father was of English descent; his mother of German and a granddaughter of , an early settler in Davidson County, Tenn. He was born in Warren County, Ky. His father moved to Jackson County, Mo., when he was a Frederick STUMP small boy, where he grew up in the dark backwoods and never attended school. He had a fine working education. His mother taught him to spell, read and write and a few rules in arithmetic, what she knew. He mastered Webster’s “blue back,” and then engaged as a school-teacher, which he followed for several years, working his way up to a high grade in the English language. After leaving the schoolhouse, he continued his studies in all the departments useful in practical life. He came to Tennessee in 1850, read law in the office of Hon. W.P. HICKERSON, in Manchester, was admitted to the bar in 1852, and has continued in the practice at that place ever since. His father was a Whig and an uncompromising supporter of Henry CLAY. He was schooled in the doctrines of the Whig party, and the old Baptist Church doctrine, which his parents held sacred. He is one of the few men who have gotten away from all of their early political and religious teaching.  He works up all the great questions involved in human life.

He is independent in thought and action, without the slightest tinge of superstition. He is anxious to have an intelligent people, grand in purpose, noble in sentiment and just in action. He thinks it can all be accomplished by a proper administration of government; that every man’s home should be sweetened with prosperity and happy with affection, that people should be educated and developed in harmony with their organic constitutions, that the organic parts of man should be treated as sciences, that ignorant sentiment always has been a dangerous element; that ignorance is not the normal state of man, but that it is consequent upon an inefficient administration of government. He is not a member of any organization or society, is strictly conservative, and is deeply interested in the general welfare of humanity. He never hesitates a moment to advocate the right, and condemn the wrong. He has the utmost contempt for time services and policy people. He never annoys anyone with complaints about anything unpleasant. He has schooled himself on the bright side of humanity, and he keeps that side before the people. He delights in trying to make everyone happy. His motto is

“The world is as we make it,
And life is as we make it.”

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

AYDELOTT, James G.

James G. AYDELOTT, a lawyer, and one of the most prominent citizens of Tullahoma, Tenn., was born in Hickman, Ky, November 3, 1845, and is the son of John D. and Sarah (Grizzard) AYDELOTT. The father was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1818, and died at Hickman, Ky., in 1852. The mother, born in Nashville, Tenn., in 1827, is the daughter of James GRIZZARD, the pioneer merchant of Tullahoma. When a small boy our subject removed with his mother to Tullahoma, where he has since resided. While a man of good education, his attendance at public school did not exceed three months altogether, having been taught entirely by his mother, who was a lady of fine education and more than ordinary attainments, educated as she was at the old Nashville Female Academy.

In 1860 our subject entered the store of J.B. WITHERBY as clerk, remaining there until the occupation of Tullahoma by Gen. BRAGG. He then entered the Confederate Army news depot, serving in that position until the Georgia campaign, when he went on duty at the headquarters of the Army of the Tennessee, where he remained until after the surrender in North Carolina, having been under Gens. JOHNSTON, BRAGG and HOOD. At the close of the war he returned home and occupied a position as clerk in the store of CRAIN & WITHERBY, being at the same time a member of the firm of AYDELOTT & STEVENS, manufacturers of harness, saddles, boots and shoes. In 1869 he entered into partnership with Joel WITHERBY in general merchandise, in which he was engaged until 1873, when the firm was dissolved by the retirement of the senior member to private life. He next became a member of the firm of AYDELOTT, DAVIDSON & Co., in 1875, but retired from the same in a few months. In 1876 he formed a copartnership with John P. BENNETT, and remained in the same until 1878. In 1880 he engaged in the lumber and produce business, continuing until 1883. For a year and a half he was actively engaged in developing coal mining in East Tennessee, in which he was largely interested, but in 1885 closed out the controlling interest, since when he has been devoted to his law practice and office work.

Mr. AYDELOTT is, and has been for eighteen years a member of the county court, member of the board of aldermen, mayor of Tullahoma, twice, four and five years each time, and recorder the same number of times. He has been for the past twenty years an active member of the I.O.O.F., being elected in 1884 Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, and in 1885 was elected Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of the Sovereign Grand Lodge, serving in that capacity at the session of the same at Boston, Mass., in 1886. His term of office will extend to and include the meeting of the Sovereign Grand Lodge in Denver, Col., in 1887. In 1886 he was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Encampment, I.O.O.F., of Tennessee. He is also a member of the Tullahoma Lodge and Chapter F. & A.M., and of Tullahoma Lodge, A.O.U.W., representing the latter in the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. In politics he is a Democrat and belongs to the progressive Democracy of the new South; while having never asked for office, he has always taken an active part in politics,and has been a delegate to every county, congressional and State Convention held by his party in fifteen years. He is a director of the Nashville,Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway, also a director of the Tullahoma National Bank and is prominently connected with various other corporations.

Our subject was married March 20, 1872, to Sallie, daughter of George and Delilah (Troxler) CORTNER, of Bradford County, Tenn. She was born in 1851. To them have been born three children, as follows: George Cortner, born August 5, 1873; John Doak, December 6, 1875,and Jessie Mai, January 9, 1881. Mr. AYDELOTT is a member of the Episcopal, while his wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Goodspeed Pub. Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of the Counties of White, Warren, Coffee, DeKalb, and Cannon, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

WHITTEMORE, William H. (Dr.)

DR. WILLIAM H. WHITTEMORE, of Haley, was born October 6, 1853, in Davidson County, Tenn.  His father, William B. Whittemore, was a native of the same county and is of Scotch-Irish descent.  He is a prominent farmer of that county, and married  Nancy E. Hays, a native of Davidson County and daughter of John Hays.  To this union were born ten children, our subject being the eldest.  The father and mother are both living.

The Doctor was educated at Franklin College, near Nashville, where he graduated in 1869.  He received his medical education in the medical department of the University of Tennessee, from which institution he graduated in 1878, and then commenced the practice of his profession at Antioch, Davidson Co., Tenn.  Here he remained two years and then moved to Nashville, and was elected as county health officer, and held this position three years.  He then moved to HaIey, Bedford Co., Tenn., where he continues the practice of medicine and has already established an extensive practice.

November 8, 1882, he married Miss Georgia M. Tolmie, a native of the city of Nashville and daughter of Alexander McD. Tolmie, a prominent citizen and machinist of that city, who ran the first engine that was run on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and was for a long time master mechanic of that road.  To Dr. W. H. Whittemore and wife was born one child, Maggie T.  The Doctor is a member of the K. of H. and the Iron Hall.  He is a Democrat and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.  Mrs. Whittemore is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.

WARREN, Charles A.

CHARLES A. WARREN (deceased) was born May 21, 1820, in Blount County, Tenn.  His father, Thomas S. Warren, was born and partly raised in Virginia.  He immigrated with his parents to East Tennessee when young.  He was married in 1809.  The mother, Susan Sevier Snyder, was born in Nashville.  When she was quite young she was taken to Clarksville, where her parents were murdered by the Indians and she was the only one of the family who escaped.  She was then reared by her grandfather, Valentine Sevier, and also lived a great part of her time with Gov. Sevier. The parents of our subject moved to Bedford County in about 1828.  The father died in 1856, having been horn in 1782.  The mother was born in 1791, and died in 1863.  There is now but one of the family of ten children raised by them living:  Mrs. Jennie Ivie, the widow of C. D, Ivie, of Rutherford County.  She was born December 27, 1821. 

Charles A. Warren was reared on a farm.  He served as deputy sheriff of Bedford County for many years in his younger days.  He carried on farming all his life and was one of the most extensive business men of the county.  He was engaged in stock dealing, merchandising, etc.  He was noted for his public spirit and public enterprise and charity to the poor.  He was a Democrat in politics.  He was married May 2, 1865, to Miss Amy Thompson, daughter of G. W. ThompsonMrs. Warren died October 29, 1883, leaving a family of three children:  George, Josephine and Stanley S.  Five children have been born to the union but two, Mattie Lee and William S. have died.

Transcribed by Kathryn Hopkins

Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford & Marshall Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminescences [Sic], Observations, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1988.