Van HUSS, J.P.

J. P. Van HUSS, farmer, was born in March, 1833, in Carter County, on his present farm. He was educated in the common schools, and when twenty years old began life, and now owns 157 acres of fine land. In 1860 Rebecca, a daughter of Daniel and Barbara (Roadcap) NEAD, of Hagerstown, Md., and Rockbridge County, Va., respectively, became his wife, About 1837 they came to Washington County, where the father died. The children born to our subject and wife are as follows: Minnie F., James M., Daniel F., Barbara E., Flora J., William L. and John D.

He and his wife are Baptists, the latter of the German Church. He is a Republican and Prohibitionist. He was a justice in 1860 and has been since 1882. From January, 1888 to 1887, he was a trustee in 1866, and served four terms. He was deputy sheriff three years, and is a Master Mason. He was twice elected moderator of the Watauga Association of Baptists, and was also clerk of the same body from its organization in 1868 for six consecutive years. He is the ninth of eleven children (five of whom yet survive) of Mathias and Lovina (Duggar) Van HUSS, natives of Carter (now Johnson) County and the present Carter County respectively. The former was a soldier in 1812, a Whig, a farmer, and a blacksmith. He was a son of Valentine Van HUSS, of North Carolina, and of Carter County, the latter born about 1778. He was of Dutch descent, while the mother was of Scotch-English origin. The mother was a daughter of was a daughter of William DUGGAR, a native of North Carolina, and a pioneer of Dugger’s Ferry. He was a soldier of the Revolution and married three times. The Duggar family are long lived.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

TAYLOR, C.C.

C. C. TAYLOR, farmer, was born in Carter County, September 12, 1846, the son of C. C. and Nancy (Duncan) TAYLOR, the former born in this county, May 15, 1795, the son of Dr. Isaac TAYLOR; of Virginia, who was born in 1756, and came to what is now Carter County about 1776. He was in the Revolution. The father was a physician and farmer and married, January 28, 1833. the daughter of Jeremiah DUNCAN, who was born July 4, 1809. Two sons and one daughter are now living. Our subject was educated at Boone’s Creek Seminary, and has always been a successful farmer. He was United States Internal revenue guager for five years, and in 1870 deputy marshall and census taker. In 1867 he married Frances T., a daughter of George D. WILLIAMS. Their children are Lucy N., Margaret E. A., George C. and Frank A. H. Our subject is a Republican, a Mason, and a member of the Christian Church.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

SMITH, John C.

John C. SMITH, clerk and master of the chancery court, was born near Elizabethton, August 26, 1844, the son of James O. and Rosana (Ellis) SMITH, the former born in 1818 in North Carolina, the son of Caleb Smith, of Pennsylvania, who is mentioned in the sketch of J. P. SMITH. The mother was born in Carter County, the daughter of John ELLIS. Our subject was educated at Elizabethton, and when seventeen went through the lines, and July 2, 1862, joined Company F, Second Federal Tennessee Infantry, and on November 6, 1863, was captured at Rogersville and imprisoned at Belle Isle, Richmond, then in Andersonville, and finally exchanged December 15, 1864, He then went to Annapolis, and returned to Knoxville; but on March 19, 1865, rejoined his command at Cumberland Gap. He was mustered out at Knoxville June 19, 1865. He then entered the claim business at Elizahethton until 1868, when he began merchandising. In 1873 he entered his present office. On December 22, 1868, he married Eva V. a daughter of Isaac P. TIPTON, deceased. She was born in April, 1845, and has borne five children to our subject. Both parents are Methodists.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

SMITH, J.P. (Judge)

Judge J. P. SMITH, chancellor of the first chancery division of Tennessee, was born in Johnson County, March 30, 1846, the son of A. D. and Mary (Powell) SMITH, the former born in Wilkes County, N. C., in 1808, the son of Caleb SMITH, a native of North Carolina. Eleven brothers, including the father of the latter, were with Gen Gates in the Revolution, and two were killed. Caleb married Elizabeth DOREN, a daughter of Robert DOREN, of Ireland, and afterward, in 1810, a pioneer of Tennessee. The marriage occurred in North Carolina. He was an iron bar manufacturer and farmer, and died before our subject was born. The father was a sheriff of Carter County about 1830, and in 1835 became sheriff of Johnson County, after which he became circuit clerk, until 1856. He was a lawyer, and engaged in active practice until 1863, when Gen. Burnaide authorized him and John K. MILLER, as lieutenant-colonel and colonel, to organize the Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, but he died in November, 1863, before the organization was completed. The mother was born near Washington City, Va., February 27, 1816, the daughter of John POWELL, a sea captain, who died while his daughter was a child. She came to her relatives in East Tennessee, and in 1832 was married.

Our subject, the sixth of eight children, grew up in Johnson County until his seventeenth year, attending James Keys’ private school at Taylorsville. He then joined Company B, Fourth Union Tennessee Infantry, at Nashville, scouting through the Confederate lines to Kentucky. In October 1864, he became second lieutenant; and was mustered out August 2, 1865, at Nashville. He then entered a claim office in Knoxville, and continued until November, 1867, when he began law, and assisted in the clerk’s and master’s office at Elizabethton. He was admitted to the bar in October, 1869, and in 1870 began practice in Johnson County, where he resided until December, 1880, and then became assistant United States attorney for the eastern district of Tennessee. On July 8, 1885, he resigned and moved to Carter County, and in 1886 became chancellor of the first chancery division. He was married in February, 1867, to Mary A., a daughter of William CRAIG, born July 2, 1846. Two of their nine children are deceased. He and his wife are Presbyterians.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

SCOTT, J.P.

J. P. SCOTT, proprietor of the Watauga Woolen Mills, and one of the prominent citizens of Carter County, was born in that county August 19, 1834, and is the son of John and Jane (Humphreys) SCOTT. The father was born in Washington County in 1797, and was a soldier of the war of 1812, participating in the battle of Horse Shoe. He was a carpenter by trade, and also followed farming. He was quite prominent during his life, and served as a captain in the militia. He died in 1857. His father was Absalom SCOTT, a native of Scotland, who immigrated to Maryland, where he was married, and then came to Tennessee and settled in Washington County, of which he was one of the pioneers. The mother was born in Carter County, on Doe River, three miles above Elizabethton in 1808, and was the daughter of Elisha HUMPHREYS, a farmer of Carter County. She died in 1868. She was a member of the Baptist Church. To the parents were born nine children, of which our subject is the fifth.

He was reared partly on the farm, and also worked at different trades. In 1869 he associated himself with Messrs. Isaac SLINKER and C. H. LEWIS, and established the Doe River Woolen Mills both of whom were Northern men, and were attracted to the location, and its rare advantages by the report of the State geologists just after the war, and by the lectures delivered in the North by N. G. TAYLOR, the father of the present governor. Remaining with that establishment for about six years, he then sold out his interest in that mill and established the Watauga Mills, of which he is the present proprietor. He was married, in 1870, to Emma Josephine FLETCHER, who was born at Newport, Cocke County, in 1844, and is the daughter of A. J. FLETCHER. To this union seven children have been born, two of whom are dead.

The Watauga Woolen Mills, J. P. Scott, proprietor, of Elizabethton, Tenn., were established in 1876 by the present proprietor. The mills have a daily capacity of about 300 yards, while during the year 1886 upward of 45,000 yards of goods were manufactured. It has water and steam power and 815 spindles, and uses 150 pounds per day. About $15,000 capital is invested. The large two story building is on the Watauga River, one mile from Elizabethton

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

PEEBLES, Andrew J.

Andrew J. PEEBLES, a minister and farmer, was born in Carter County, January 16, 1829, the son of William and Elizabeth (Sheets) PEEBLES, the former a native of Carter County, and died in 1875, at the age of eighty-nine. The mother was born in Virginia, and died in 1886, aged ninety-two. They had six sons and four daughters.

Our subject was educated at Paperville, Pleasant Grove and Fall Branch, and In 1854 began the practice of medicine, partly in North Carolina, Mississippi and Tennessee. In the war he was a quartermaster, and since then has been a farmer, now owning 325 acres in the Fifth District. February 11, 1858, he married Clarissa H., a daughter of Henry RAY, and born February 7, 1841, in North Carolina. They have four sons and two daughters. He is a Methodist, and his wife a Missionary Baptist. Our subject is a Mason, and postmaster at Okolona. Their eldest son, Rev. H. M. PEEBLES, was educated at Milligan College, and is now an itinerant Methodist Protestant minister.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

NAVE, Daniel S.

D. S. NAVE, merchant, was born September 2, 1836, in Carter County, and when fifteen years old his father’s death compelled him to support the family. He is now owner of 104 acres of land, besides a stock of goods at Hampton, where he been a merchant for two years. In 1866 he became revenue collector, and served until 1870. September 23, 1863, he joined Company A, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and was mustered out September 5, 1865, at Knoxville, as first lieutenant, while he had first been orderly sergeant.

In March, 1860, he married Elizabeth BOWERS, a native of Carter County. Their children are Daniel S., Jr., Mary J., John T. and Sarah L. He and his wife are Baptists, of which church he has been a deacon two years. He is a Republican. He is the ninth of ten children of T. and J. (Stover) NAVE, natives of Carter County, and died at the ages of fifty-four and seventy-eight, respectively. They were Baptists; he a prominent deacon. The Stover family were of Dutch descent. The grandparents, Abraham and Mary (Williams) NAVE, were among the first settlers of Carter County and were Baptists. Abraham was the second son of Teter NAVE, who, with three sons, was among the first pioneers on the Watauga River.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

McCORKLE, J.J.

J. J. McCORKLE, farmer, was born in Sullivan County, January 4, 1846, the son of Samuel and Lucinda (Colbaugh) McCORKLE, the former a native of Tennessee, and born in 1818, the son of Joseph, a native of Pennsylvania, and of Irish origin. The father was a highly successful farmer, and died in 1885. The mother, born in 1812, in Sullivan County, was the daughter of John COLBAUGH, a soldier in the war of 1812, and a farmer. Their children were William M., John J., Eliza, Mary, Martha, Susan and Harriet.

Our subject educated himself by the light of a pine knot, and has been very succesiful as a farmer. When seventeen years old he joined Company H, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and was mustered out April 6, 1866, as captain, in the First United States Artillery. He has since been farming, and for five years was a trustee, and for four years a sheriff. September 20 1866, he married Ruthey E., a daughter of John and Louise (Amess) HENTRIX, and born in Carter County January 15,1849. They have eight sons and four daughters. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church, of which he is an elder. He is an able and esteemed man.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

JOHNSON, Robert T.

The paternal grandfather of our subject, was Jacob JOHNSON, who immigrated to Tennessee from Millerstown, Md., soon after the close of the Revolutionary war, and settled near Eden Ridge,within five miles of Kingsport, Sullivan County. He was a farmer by vocation, and alsb kept a tavern. He lived there until his death, which occurred in about 1854. He was married to Elizabeth CHURCH, who was a native of Maryland, being born near Hagerstown. She died in 1848. To the grandparents six children were horn, of which our subject’s father was the fourth child. Thomas C.,. the father, was born in Sullivan County on June 5, 1806 and was reared on the farm and acquired a practical education in the schools of the neighborhood.

He removed to Carter County in 1834 with Dr. Joseph POWEL, Sr., with whom he made his home and studied medicine, but never practiced. He was a farmer by vocation, and was quite a prominent man in the county, and served a number of Years as deputy sheriff and coroner, and was lieutenant colonel of militia, and also major and adjutant under Col. Daniel STOVER. He was a member of Deshield Lodge No. 238, F. & A. M., but was initiated in Kennedy Lodge of that order. He was an industrious and enterprising citizen, and always took an active part in public affairs. He was industrious and successful, and accumulated a good competency. He died January 5, 1879.

The maternal great-grandfather of our subject was Samuel TIPTON, who was the eldest son of Col. John TIPTON, who fought in the battle of Franklin with Gen. John SEVIER. Col. John TIPTON immigrated to Tennessee from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, and settled in what is now Carter County during the Revolutionary war. He was the grandfather of Gen. Jacob TIPTON, for whom Tipton County, Tenn., was named. Abraham TIPTON, the grandfather of our subject, was the son of Samuel TIPTON, and was named for Col. Abraham TIPTON, who was killed in Bear Grass, Ky., during the Revolutionary war by Indians. He was born in Carter County August 27, 1794, and married Martha LACY of Carter County. He served as sheriff and justice of the peace of Carter County for a number of years, being elected sheriff in 1836, the first one after the adoption of the new constitution, He was elected to the State Senate in 1849. He was also adjutant and major of militia. He died July 3, 1868. To this union two children were born, of which our subject’s mother was the second. Nancy J., the mother, was born in Elizabethton on November 7, 1818.

The parents of our subject were married January 8, 1887, and to them have been born nine children, six of whom are living. The children are as follows: Martha B., born May 28, 1838, now Mrs. HUFF, of Doyle Station, White County, Tenn.; Saraphenla, born December 30, 1840, married John T. KING, of King’s Springs, in Carter County, and died November 2, 1884; Anna M., born December 13, 1843, now Mrs. D. N. REECE, and living at Carter Depot, Carter County; Mary C., born September 6, 1847, now Mrs. W.T. RUCHER, of Doyle Station; Ada L., born January 3.1850, married Hiram BOWMAN, of Johnson County, and died December 8, 1877; A. T., born May 28, 1853; Eugene, born November 7, 1859, died same day; Robert T.,born December 20,1860; William, born February 25, 1858, A. T., is a resident of Elizabethton. William is United States mail agent on the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railway, between Bristol and Chattanooga. He was married on April 6, 1887, to Miss Ella BRIDEWELL, of Knoxville, and is also a resident of Elizabethton.

Robert T., the subject, is depot and express agent and telegraph operator at Elizabethton, and is also engaged in merchandising at that point, being senior member of the firm of Johnson & Waters. He was married September 6, 1868, to Josie B. HYDER, youngest daughter of Elder J. H. HYDER. To this union three children have been born. The mother of Mrs. R. T. JOHNSON is a sister to Andrew FLETCHER, who was Secretary of State under Gov. BROWNLOW’s administration.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.

JOBE, A. (Dr.)

Dr. A. JOBE was born near Elizabethton, Carter Co., Tenn., October 9, 1817, the son of Joshua and Ruth (Tipton) JOBE. The former was born in Washington County (before the State of Tennessee was formed) September 15,1785. He was the son of David JOBE who immigrated to this new country, about the year 1777, from Shenandoah County, Va. He owned and resided on the farm where Johnson City now stands, and died there, about the year 1799.

Our subject’s father was a farmer, and was once sheriff of Carter County. In the war of 1812, he volunteered and marched with Gen. Jackson’s Army to the Horse Shoe, Talledega, and other battle fields, and then on to Mobile, Ala. About 1821 he moved from Carter to Blount County, and after living there about ten years (The Governor permitting settlers to move into the Cherokee Nation), he moved in about ten miles of where Dalton now stands. While residing here our subject, fifteen years old, attended the councils of the Indians for two or three years, and was present at the concluding of the treaty between the General Government, and the head men of the Nation. The father died at Ringgold, Ga, May 8, 1868. The mother was the daughter of Thomas TIPTON (son of Col. John TIPTON, who helped achieve American Independence, at the battle of King’s Mountain, and Indian battles He also fought the memorable Franklin battle, against Gov. Sevier), was born in Carter County, August 27, 1791, and died at Ringgold, Ga., May 22, 1864.

In June, 1836, there being trouble with the Indians, especially the Creeks, the Government called out troops, and our subject being then nearly nineteen, volunteered in the United States Army, to protect white settlers, and gather up and remove the destitute bands of Indians, west of the Mississippi. On completing his term of service and receiving an honorable discharge, he came to Jonesboro, and entered school, where he remained until February, 1839, when he commenced the mercantile business, with his brother, under the firm name of A. & D. Jobe, at Ringgold, Ga. In 1841 he commenced reading medicine with Dr. Samuel B. CUNNINGHAM, of Jonesboro, Tenn. In 1848 he commenced practice, at Burusyille, N. C. In 1844 he married Sophronia, only daughter of James H. POTEET, born in Yancey County, N.C., May 8, 1826, and in 1845 moved to Elizabethton, Tenn., where he practiced medicine and surgery up to and during the war.

In 1848-49 he attended Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky., and graduated from the medical department. In February, 1866, he received the appointment of special agent of the postoffice department, with headquarters at Raleigh, N. C., and served in that capacity three years and a half. While in this office, the Secretary of the Interior, learning that the Doctor had a knowledge of Indian character, procured a leave of absence from the postoffice department, an appointed him special agent of Indian affairs, and sent him to the Chippewa Nation, in the northern part of Minnesota. This was a dangerous mission. The Indians had recently murdered their principal Chief, and were ready to go on “the war path.” By traveling about 800 miles in the Nation, and holding councils with them at their towns, he was enabled to appease their wrath, and settle their misunderstandings. Our subject and his wife are Methodists. Five of their eleven children are deceased. E. D., the only living son, married Eva TAYLOR, sister to Gov. TAYLOR; Emma is Mrs. J. B. MILLER; Mollie is Mrs. Dr. HUNTER; Hattie is the wife of Nat. W. TAYLOR, brother of Gov. TAYLOR; the single daughters are Ruth and Sallie.

 

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin


Source: Goodspeed Publishing Co. History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of from Twenty-Five to Thirty Counties of East Tennessee. Chicago: Goodspeed, 1887.