TROUTT, J.M.

J. M. TROUTT, leading attorney of Henderson, Tenn., is a native Kentuckian, born in Marshall County, April 8, 1848; son of William and Isabella (Watkins) TROUTT, both natives of Marshall County, Tenn. The father was born about 1804, and moved to Kentucky about 1840. He served for many years both as constable and deputy sheriff. He was also engaged in agricultural pursuits in which he was quite successful. He died about 1857. The mother was born about the same year as her husband and is now living with her son, Dr. J. R. TROUTT, at Clear Springs, Ky. Our subject was educated at the McKenzie College, and also at Bethel Co1lege but subsequently attended Princeton College, Kentucky. In 1871 and 1872 Mr. Troutt read law under Judge McCAMPBELL of Paris, and was admitted to the bar about 1874; after which he practiced at Dresden until 1880. He then came to Henderson where he has since remained. He is an able practitioner and has built up an extensive practice. He was one of the leaders in organizing Chester County after the act was passed setting it aside as an independent county.

In 1874 Mr. TROUTT married Emma TRAVIS, a native of Henry County, Tenn., born in 1850, and the daughter of Dr. Joseph TRAVIS. She died in 1876. December, 1877, he married R. PROVINCE, a native of McKenzie, Tenn., born in 1852 and the daughter of Andrew and Mary PROVINCE. To this union was born one child, James McCord, Mr. TROUTT is a Democrat in politics, an excellent citizen and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. TROUTT is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1804 he enlisted in Company G, Third Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Confederate Army, and participated in many important battles. He was captured at Selma, Ala,, paroled at Montgomery and returned home in 1865.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present ; Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Henderson, Chester, McNairy, Decatur, and Hardin Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Nashville, TN: Goodspeed Pub. Co, 1887.

WRIGHT, W.M.

W. M. Wright, M.D., was born in DeKalb County, Tenn., November 6, 1838, son of Dr. Ebenezer Wright, who was born in Massachusetts in 1800. He came to Tennessee when a young man, and in 1841 removed to Huntingdon where he was engaged in the practice of medicine for twenty years. He was a man of extended learning and a prominent physician of his day. He died in Huntingdon in 1860, lamented by all who knew him. The mother of our subject was Olivia A. Wright whose maiden name was Moore. She was born in 1812, and died in 1841. She was a daughter of Col. William Moore, who was editor of one of the first newspapers of Tennessee. He was a man of distinction, and died in Carthage, Middle Tenn.

The subject of this biography is the youngest of three children and is of Scotch-Irish extraction. He has one sister, Mrs. E. M., wife of Judge L. L. Hawkins, of Huntingdon. The only brother of our subject was Col. Moses H. Wright, who was born in Dekalb County, Tenn., in 1836. When only a few years of age, he was brought by his parents to Huntingdon and here he passed his early life and received an academic education. In 1854 he was appointed by Hon. Emerson Etheridge (then a member of Congress) to a cadetship at West Point where he graduated with high honors in 1859 in the class with such men as Gen. Horace Porter, of the Federal Army and Gen. Wheeler, of the Confederate Army. During the war he served in the Confederate Army with the rank of colonel in the ordnance department, and gained a high degree of prominence, ranking second only to the chief of his department.

In 1863, near Atlanta, Ga., he married Miss Sallie Lehon, of Nashville, daughter of Rev. E. W. Lehon, who was a prominent divine of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. At the time of Col. Wright’s death, January 8, 1886, he resided in Louisville, Ky., and was a member of the firm of J. Balmforth & Co., of that city. He and J. Balmforth, one of his partners, were killed on the day above stated, by the falling in of their business house. He was an earnest Christian and one of the most prominent business men of Louisville. Dr. W. M. Wright received an academic education at Huntingdon and began the study of medicine in 1859 under the direction of his illustrious father. During the war he was assistant surgeon in the Confederate Army and was commissioned such in 1862. He was graduated from the Mission Medical College at St. Louis. Since 1865 he has been located at Huntingdon, and is one of the leading physicians of West Tennessee.

He is a Democrat politically, and for quite a number of years has taken an active part in politics. He was a member of the constitutional convention, which met at Nashville in 1870. In 1871 he was appointed superintendent of prisons four years and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at St. Louis in 1876. Dr. Wright was married in 1870 to Erin Hanna, of Paris, Tenn., born in 1850. They have four children: Jamie McNeill, Charles Hanna, William Eben and Thomas McNeill. Dr. and Mrs. Wright are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and are among the prominent people of the county.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

WILLIAMS, Lorenzo F.

Lorenzo F. Williams, farmer and citizen of the Twenty-fourth District, was born in Carroll County in 1843, and is the ninth in a family of ten children, six of whom are now living. The father, Thomas Williams, was born in North Carolina about 1795, and was of English ancestry. He received a good common-school and business education, and in 1817 married Harriet Blair. In about 1832 he immigrated to Carroll County and settled in the Thirteenth District, where his career ended. He was an active, industrious man, and at the time of his death, which occurred about 1848, was the owner of about 450 acres of land. The mother was also a native of North Carolina, born in 1809 and died about 1857.

The father having died when Lorenzo was but a child, he was reared under the tender care of a mother’s watchful eye. He received his education in the neighboring schools, and partly at Parker’s Cross Roads in Henderson County. November, 1866, he married Caledonia McCall, a native of Carroll County, born in 1849, and the daughter of Dr. Henry and Frances McCall, of Clarksburg. Eight children were the result of our subject’s marriage: Thomas H., Sidney H., Lorenzo P., Lizzie Frances, George W., Marietta, Bertha Mabel and John H.

After marriage our subject settled in the Thirteenth District for one year and then removed to the farm on which he now resides, having owned it three different times. He was in the mercantile business for some time and also lived in Kentucky a year. He is now the owner of 160 acres of valuable land all well improved, three and a half miles northeast of Clarksburg. He is a liberal supporter of all charitable and religious institutions and a Democrat in politics, casting his first presidential vote for Horatio Seymour. He was formerly a member of the Masonic fraternity but is now demitted. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are both prominent members of the Christian Church and are much esteemed citizens.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

WILLIAMS, Sanford N.

Sanford N. Williams, general merchant, is a native of Madison County, Tenn., and was born June 8, 1842, son of B. T. and Margaret (Longmire) Williams, and is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His father was born in North Carolina in 1811, and his mother in Alabama in 1805. The family came to West Tennessee about 1837, and settled in Madison County. The father died in Carroll County in 1870, but his widow is residing in Huntingdon.

Mr. Williams is the second of six children, six children and is self educated. He continued to reside on the farm until 1862, when he enlisted in Company G, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, United States Army, and served fourteen months. In 1867 he began clerking in the store of E. T. McGill in Huntingdon, and from 1868 until 1870 was deputy revenue collector for what was then the Seventh District. In 1875 he engaged in general merchandising, and is now one of the leading business men of Huntingdon.

Fredonia Adams became his wife in 1868. She was born in Henderson County, Tenn., in 1847, and is the mother of two children: Benjamin J. and Thomas N. Mr. Williams is a Republican, and cast his first presidential vote for A. Lincoln. He joined the Masons in 1865, and became a Royal Arch Mason in 1867. His wife belongs to the Christian Church. Mr. Williams is not a member of any church, and is rather liberal in his religious views.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

WILLIAMS, E.W.

E. W. Williams was born in Carroll County, five miles east of Huntingdon, April 17, 1832. He is the sixth of seven children—six sons and one daughter—born to Rowland and Mary (Mills) Williams. His father was born in North Carolina, where he was raised and married, and soon after this he moved to Tennessee and settled in Carroll County, where his family was reared. He died at his home in 1836. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina, and died at the homestead in 1841. Mr. Williams was raised on the farm, having the benefit of the schools in the county, and has made farming his business.

He served as constable of his district in 1865, and also served as deputy sheriff of the county from 1866 to 1870. He was in this year, after the expiration of his deputyship, elected as magistrate for six years, but resigned to accept the office of sheriff, tendered him by the voters of the county. He served as sheriff three terms, which is the constitutional limit. In 1881 he was elected notary public by the county court, and has served in that capacity ever since; he is also magistrate of his district, and has served three years in this office.

Mr. Williams was married in Carroll County July 30, 1850, to Miss W. J. Edwards, daughter of Nathaniel Edwards, a farmer. From this union were nine children, of whom eight are living: Sarah A. (Rogers), William A., John B., James N., Elizabeth J., Washington H., Loruza M. and Ella Alpine. Rowland N. died July 30, 1880. The mother of this family was born in Carroll County in 1829. Mr. Williams is a firm Republican, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is exceedingly popular in his county, possessing the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens, being a man of liberal ideas and correct principles. He has 360 acres of land on which he raises cotton and tobacco and large quantities of the cereals. The farm is two miles east of Hollow Rock, and with its comfortable dwelling house is a desirable home. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, as does his wife and all of the children, except one.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

TUCKER, Alexander C.

Alexander C. Tucker, farmer of the Twenty-fourth District and son of Joseph and Nnaommaah (Johnson) Tucker, was born in Carroll County, Tenn., in 1837 and is one of a family of ten children, eight of whom are living. The father was born in Raleigh, N.C. about 1817 and is of Irish extraction. He emigrated to Carroll County, with his parents when a child and was married at the age of twenty. He settled in the Twelfth District, where he still resides.

In 1862 he married his second wife, Caroline Black. He is a Christian and a much respected citizen. Our subject was reared under the parental roof and received his education in the country schools. Soon after reaching his majority the main support of the family devolved upon him, as he was the eldest boy, and as a result his education was rather neglected. In December, 1864, he married Martha Bell, a native of Carroll County, Tenn., born in 1849 and the daughter of William and Nancy Palmer. By this union our subject became the father of eight children, six now living: Nancy B., Percy Alex., S. Y. (deceased), Minnie Belle, Emma L., L. M. (deceased), Marietta and William Albert.

Soon after marriage Mr. Tucker settled on the farm where he now resides, which then belonged to the family. He is now the owner of about 368 acres of productive and valuable land. He has always been a hard working, industrious man and has accumulated his fine property by his own efforts and good business management, He was formerly a Whig in politics but since the war has affiliated with the Democratic party. He is a Mason of long standing and he and Mrs. Tucker are prominent members of the Christian Church. The mother of our subject was born in 1819 and was a devoted member of the Christian Church. She was a kind parent, a true companion and a woman who was worthy the title of wife and mother. The children are all members of the same church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

TOWNES, Henry C.

Hon. Henry C, Townes, attorney at law, and native of Carroll County, Tenn., was born June 10, 1840, son of Col. James and Julia B. (Clark) Townes, and is of Welsh-English lineage. His father was born in Virginia in 1788 and his mother in North Carolina, 1795. The Townes family came to Tennessee about 1828 and here James Townes died in 1858, and his wife in 1870. The Clark family located in the county about the same time. They were among the early settlers.

Our subject is the youngest of seven children and was educated at Huntingdon Male Academy and at Hamden Sidney College in Virginia, where he was attending school at the breaking out of the war. He enlisted in the Hamden City Company Twentieth Virginia, Confederate States Army, and was captured at the battle of Rich Mountain. He was subsequently exchanged and then joined the Third Virginia Cavalry and with this continued until the close of the war. He was in many important battles and in 1865 came home and began the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1867, and from that time until the present has been engaged in practicing his profession, with Albert G. Hawkins as his partner since 1874.

He is a Democrat and was married in December, 1868, to Alice Crockett of Carroll County. She was born in 1847. They have five children: Eva, Charlie M., Cora, Lida and Herbert C. Mr. Townes is a K. of H., and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Townes was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention at Chicago in 1884, and is now a member of the Senate of Tennessee, having been elected in November last to that position.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

THOMAS, Haywood B.

Haywood B. Thomas, a farmer by occupation, was born in Carroll County, September 10, 1832, and is of a family of five sons and eight daughters, born to Luke and Elizabeth (Burradelle) Thomas, himself and four sisters being the surviving members of the family. Both parents were born in Burke County, N.C., and moved to Trigg County, Ky., when young, and were married there; moved to Carroll County, Tenn., in 1825, and remained there farming until his father’s death in 1862. His father was an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church for many years. His mother remained in the county until her death in 1870.

Our subject, Haywood B. Thomas, attended Bethel College a few terms after his majority, then taught school one year in Carroll County, after which he was engaged in the marble trade until 1858, in the interest of a firm in Hickman, Ky. He was then employed in the construction of the Northwestern Railroad until 1862, when he enlisted in the Fifth Tennessee Confederate Infantry, remaining a year, and was then transferred to the Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry as first lieutenant, and held this position until Capt. Falkner’s death at Dresden, when he returned home, and remained until he married, November 7, 1867, Miss Ann Roach, the issue of this union being four sons and five daughters, all living but one son. After the war, he purchased a farm in Carroll County, which he still owns, but in June, 1885, he moved to McKenzie. On his farm, which contains 250 acres, are Indian mounds, and a number of fine springs of freestone water. Mr. Thomas is an extensive cotton grower, paying but little attention to the cultivation of the cereals. He and family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he is an elder. He is also a member of the board of aldermen of McKenzie and board of trustees of Bethel College, and vice-president of the State Agricultural Wheel, and president of the Carroll County Agricultural Wheel.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

TEACHOUT, E.B.

E. B. Teachout, ticket agent, express agent and telegraph operator of Huntingdon, was born July, 1845, in Ohio, and is the son of S. M. and C. A. (Bolton) Teachout. The father and mother were natives of the Buckeye State and he was a farmer by occupation; for the past few years have been living in the city of New York. They have three children living; Frank, who resides in Memphis, railroading; Clara, wife of Joseph Payne, who lives in New York, and E. B., our subject.

He was educated in the schools of his native State, remaining with his parents there until he was fifteen years old. The first year after leaving home he worked on a farm. In 1863 he enlisted in Company I, Ninth Regiment Ohio Cavalry, United States Army. He took an active part in the battles at Decatur, Florence, Nashville and numerous minor engagements. After the battle at Nashville, and while on his way to Athens, he injured his right heel, as the result of which a surgical operation was performed. He has never fully recovered from the wound, receiving $4 per month as pension. He was honorably discharged six months previous to the surrender, on account of disability.

During his illness he commenced the study of telegraphy, at Brownsboro, Ala. In 1866 he assumed charge of an office at Tantallon, Tenn. While there he was attacked by a catamount while seated in his office. A long and bloody hand to hand fight ensued. As Mr. Teachout was about to get the better of the animal an assistant entered, and the animal was soon dispatched. In 1867 he went to Dresden, Weakley County, and was railroad operator at said place six or seven years. He then went to New York City and was proprietor of a hotel for eighteen months. In 1877 he came to Huntingdon and entered upon his duties at this place—the railroad office, which position he has since held with good satisfaction.

In July, 1868, he married Miss Addie Ross, daughter of W. R. and Adeline Ross. Mrs. Teachout was born in 1846, in Weakley County. They have four children: Charles, Olla, Stanley and Alva. Mr. Teachout is a man of good business capacity, courteous, obliging and very popular as a railroad official. He has a nice home and a beautiful residence. In politics he is a Democrat, voting for S. J. Tilden in 1876; and is an ancient member of A. O. U. W. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.

STOFLE, Robert M.

Robert M. Stofle, was born in Weakley County, Tenn., April 16, 1850, and is one of two sons and eight daughters, surviving members of a family of twelve children born to Thomas and Frances (Hoggard) Stofle. His father was of Henry County and his mother of Weakley County, Tenn. They were married in 1849, and engaged in farming in Henry County until his death in 1885. His mother still lives in Weakley County.

Our subject remained with his parents until he was twenty-three years old, and October 9, 1873, married Johanna Johnson. Three children have been the issue of this union: John Thomas, deceased; William and Robert. In 1874 Mr. Stofle was elected constable of his district, in Weakley County, serving four years; he then removed to McKenzie, Tenn., and engaged in the mercantile business, under the firm name of Gilbert, Stofle & Co., which copartnership was continued three years, when he embarked in the livery and live stock trade, which he still continues, supplying McKenzie with first-class livery stock, carriages, buggies, etc.

 

Transcribed by David Donahue


Source: History of Tennessee from the Earliest Time to the Present: Together with an Historical and a Biographical Sketch of Carroll, Henry and Benton Counties, Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Original Observations, Reminiscences, Etc., Etc. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1978.