First Name Last Name Page #   First Name Last Name Page #
Mary Alexander 41 Robert Percy Gardner 115
Louise (Vance) Bailey 83 John Robert Gardner 115
Austin Baugh 25 Rev. William Gardner 116
Rosetta Beatty 76, 79 Alma (Bridgeforth) Gardner 118
Martha Beatty 79 Stephen Gardner, Jr. 113
Mary (Gardner) Benson 74 Stephen Gardner, Jr. 120
Mitchell & Mattie Birdsong 64, 82 Flournoy Gardner, Sr. 95
Sim Bledsoe 14 Buford W. Gardner, Sr. 102
Swettie Bledsoe 77 Charles Atwarter Garrison 114
Mary Ida (Garrison) Bledsoe 117 Annie (McKissack) Gray 11
Anna Lee Bledsoe 119 Henry Gray 11
Emma (Stevenson) Bledsoe 119 Russell Grisby 76
Dr. Robert Fulton Boyd 14 Richard  and Louis (sister) Harwell 29
Velma (Gardner) Braden 75 Clark Harwell 41
Alfred Brenson 111 Richard & Mary (Foust) Harwell 48
James Thomas Bridgeforth 30, 61 Dorothy Jean (Gardner) Henry 106
Sam Bridgeforth 34 A. Thomas Hill 24
Teo Bridgeforth 47 John Ed Holt 76
Isaiah Sr. & Lizze Brea (Bledsoe Bridgeforth 66 Amanda (Brown) Holt 101
Hezekiah Bridgeforth 98 Thaddeus “Thad” Holt 114
Arnie Arch & Mary Lou (Carter) Burch 63 Sarah Holt 118
Rev. Harvey Butler 35 Pearl McKissack Johnson 11
Minor & Betty (Anthony) Carter 12 Mildred Louise Johnson 40
M.D. Chainey 60 Millie Johnson 76
Edward Allen Clack 62 Dr. William Alberta Lewis 13
Elizabeth (Gardner) Clack 112 Sally (Pruitt) Lewis 54
Mary (Gardner) Clay 58 Dr. David Marshall 21
Robert, John, Roosevelt, H. Wood Coleman 59 Annie McKissack Maxwell 11
Charles & Parlee (Gardner) Coleman 63, 112 James McClaurine 55
Ellen (Gardner) Cooper 86 Monroe McClaurine, Jr 85
Jody “Joe D” Daly 69 Moses McKissack 9
James Alex Davis 39 Gabriel McKissack 11
Sarah Davis 51 Lizzie Black McKissack 11
Laverta, Gladys, Tommie, Scott Davis 57 Calvin McKissack 11
Isabella (Pruitt Lewis) Davis 80 William McKissack 11
Lavern Davis 96 Abraham McKissack 11
Grant Davis 102 Arthur McKissack 11
Anne Deberry 11 Thomas McKissack 11
Amanda McKissack Deberry 11 Moses McKissack, III 11
Rosa (Bridgeforth) Driver 22 Tobe Mclin 60
Lex & Ethel Bridgeforth Holt) Driver 64 Aaron & Van (brothers) Moody 90
Ella Mary Eddings 53,58 Robert “Dean” Neese 89
Iwilla Eddings 77, 84 Willie Lee Neese 93
Susan “Susie” (Gardner) Eddings 78 Emma (Holt) Neese 98
Anna Lee Eddings 84 Phillip Rhodes 19
Josephine Fitzpatrick 25 Carl & Alberta (Eddings) Sloan 53
Lula (Holt) Freeman 76 Jewell Dean Sloan 94
Matt Gardner 19, 32,
55, 59,
85
Jones Smith 13, 15
Rev. Raymond Gardner 35 Alice & Maimie Smith 62
Martin Luther Gardner 40 Minnie Bell (Coleman) Smith 73
Rev. Shellie Lee Gardner 42 Mattie “Pinkie” Smith 116
Raymond & Frances Gardner 46 Prince & Georgia (Benson) Stevenson 45
Richard & Florinda (Holt) Gardner 47 Mary Sue Stevenson 65
Atha & Ether (Bonner) Gardner 49 Eva Stevenson 86
Henrietta (Jenkins) Gardner 50 Henry Stevenson 106
John & Lera (Driver) Gardner 51, 65,
72,80,
82
Howard P. Swinea 70
Walter & Lura (Daughter) Gardner 65 Yancy (Daughter) Swinea 100
Booker T. Gardner 67 Yancy (Father) Swinea 105
Clyde & Cathy Gardner 71 Lizzie (Gardner) Swinney 99
Walker & Lura (Daughter) Gardner 65, 72 Mitchell Swinney 120
Henrietta “Henn” Gardner 77 Mary Frances (McKissack) Utley 11
Adelle Gardner 85 Greatus “Jeep” Vance 71
Gardner Boys Gardner 87 Ellen (Gardner Vance 81
Willie T. Gardner 91 William Houston Vance 81
James William Gardner 95 Kelso Vance 104
Stephen Gardner 97 Ervis Vassar 48, 83
Rev. Raymond Gardner 103 John Vassar 109
Rachel (Vasser) Gardner 107 Mary Ellis Vassar 110
Mary Magdelene (Maggie) Gardner 107 Bertha (Blair) Vassar 111
L. Z. “Hog” Gardner 108 Sam Walter 35
Louis Gardner 109

Below is the index for “North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee 1778-1791” Compiled by Goldene Fillers Burgner.  Please browse the index and contact Bettye Liberty with first and last name if you need a lookup in the book.

[pdf-embedder url=”http://tngenweb.org/giles/files/2017/03/North-Carolina-Land-Grants-in-Tennessee-Index.pdf” title=”North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee Index”]

Source:  Compiled by Goldene Fillers Burgner.

The Tennessee State Penitentiary opened in 1831.  It was located near downtown Nashville. Prior to 1831 the convicts were housed in the county jails.  It was the suggestion of Governor McMinn to fund the construction of a state penitentiary by obtaining a bank loan.

Cell Block and D

The construction started in 1830 and opened January 1, 1831.

Governor Carroll dedicated the new penitentiary.  The new facility contained 200 cells, storehouse, hospital, and a few other buildings.  Construction on a new building began in 1893,  The new building opened in 1898.

Below is a list of prisoners from Giles County.  These names came from two published volumes of Tennessee Convicts: Early Records of the State Penitentiary, 1831-1870 located at the Tennessee Library and Archives.

You can request a penitentiary record by emailing the Tennessee Library and Archives at [email protected]

 

Last Name First Name Year Race Age Crime County
Abernathy Ben 1866 C 39 larceny Giles
Allen Ceasar 1869 C 23 larceny Giles
Ars Henry 1867 18 horse stealing Giles
Ballentine Foulks 1868 C 27 larceny Giles
Beckwith Pleasant C 25 murder Giles
Brown Allen B. 1861 36 larceny Giles
Brown Stephen 1866 C larceny Giles
Clark Alonzo 1869 40 larceny Giles
Clark Alonzo 1870 C larceny Giles
Collins Charles C 19 larceny Giles
Collins Charles 1868 19 larceny Giles
Cook N. 1861 25 larceny Giles
Couch Ed C 46 horse stealing Giles
Hall William 1853 50 stabbing Giles
Hardison Allen 1868 C 22 larceny Giles
Hopgood Gorden C 17 horse stealing Giles
Kelly James 1869 C 26 rape Giles
Kelly James 1869 C rape Giles
Lightfoot John W 30 larceny Giles
Logan James 1859 22 larceny Giles
Mason Hamp 1870 C larceny Giles
McLaren Ned C 58 larceny Giles
McMillan William H. 1856 44 larceny Giles
Molen Charles 1864 19 stealing Money Giles
O’Brian Francis 1854 rape Giles
Pascall Frank 1869 C 24 larceny Giles
Pfeifer George 1864 21 stealing Giles
Reed Charles 1869 C 23 larceny Giles
Smith Bob 1866 C 21 larceny Giles
Wade John C 40 larceny Giles
Wood John 1854 57 rape Giles
Wood John 1854 57 rape Giles

Source:  http://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/inmates-tennessee-state-penitentiary-1831-1870.

 

 

We are pleased to share the news that Giles County, after many years, finally has a new county coordinator! Please join me in welcoming Bettye Liberty!

Bettye is currently our coordinator for Marshall County and is excited to have the opportunity to help the Giles County site now grow. If you have contributions you would like to share or have suggestions for what Bettye can add, please do not hesitate to let her know. Welcome Bettye and thank you for being a great team member in the TNGenWeb Project!

 


Taneya Koonce, TNGenWeb State Coordinator

 

Frank HEIDLINGER, was sentenced to the penitentiary from Giles county at the July term of the Circuit Court, at Pulaski, and was taken by the Sheriff to Nashville, arriving last Saturday morning, and before he had changed his citizens clothes for those of the prison, was shot and killed by M.L. PHELPS who had been a guard at the prison for twenty years. PHELPS escaped.


Source: Whig & Tribune. 26 August 1871. Available online at Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers.

PINK M. EZELL, dealer in stoves, tinware and house-furnishing goods, is a native Pulaski, Tenn., born January 19, 1860, son of P. H. and Mary Ezell, old and prominent settlers of this county. Our subject is one of ten children, and is of Scotch-French descent. He was educated in the Pulaski schools, and when about sixteen years of age became salesman in the grocery store of W. R. Craig, and later clerked in a stove and tin store, and continued in this capacity until 1880, when he began business for himself, and has continued successfully in the stove and tinware business up to the present time. Mr. Ezell has made his own way in life, and is one of the prosperous young business men of Pulaski. In 1882 he united his fortunes with that of Mattie McCord, daughter of W. L. McCord, ex-editor of the Pulaski Citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Ezell have two daughters, named Mary and Margery. Mr. Ezell is a Democrat, and he and wife are church members.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

23. March 2014 · 1 comment · Categories: Biographies · Tags: , ,

WILL S. EZELL, county court clerk, is a native of Pulaski, Tenn., and a son of P. H. and Mary A. (Shields) EZELL. The father was born in this county in 1816, and his mother was also born in this county in 1827. The Ezell family came to Giles County in 1808, and is one of the pioneer familes of this part of Tennessee. Our subject’s birth occurred December 16, 1847. He was educated in Giles College, and in 1864 enlisted in Company K, First Tennessee. After the war he engaged as clerk in a store and for some time as book-keeper. He then engaged in the mercantile business for himself. In 1878 his father was elected county court clerk and our subject served as deputy county court clerk for four years. In 1875 he was united in marriage to Ada FAUST, of this county, and the fruits of this union were four children: Otis M., Mary A., Edith and John F. In 1882 Mr. Ezell was elected county court clerk and has since held that office. He is a thorough practical business man and has made a good officer. He is a Democrat and a Knight Templar, Pulaski Commandery, No. 12. He came of an old and well respected family, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

HON. Z. W. EWING, lawyer, a native of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of L. A. and R. A. (Leeper) EWING, and of old Scotch-lrish Presbyterian stock. His father was born near Athens, Ga., in 1809, and his mother in Bedford County, Tenn., in the same year. The father was a merchant and farmer and for many years was one of the leading magistrates of Marshall County. He died in 1853. The mother of our subject died in 1877, in Marshall County. Mr. Ewing was the seventh of eight children. During his youth his summers were spent on the farm at labor and in the winter season he attended the country schools. In 1859 he was a student at the Lewisburg M ale Academy, and in 1860 went to Maryville College, in East Tennessee, where he remained until the breaking out of the war. He then joined Capt. R. H. McCrory’s company, afterward Company H, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was promoted to lieutenant by commission, but served in the capacity of captain and major for two years. He was captured at Petersburg, Va., in 1864, and was confined under retaliation in the prisons of Fort Delaware, Fort Pulaski, Hilton Head and Sullivan’s Island, upon the southern coast. He was released in 1865, and came home and resumed his studies. In 1866 he entered the University of Virginia, and there remained until the summer of 1868. In the fall of that year he taught school at Richmond, Tenn. In 1870 he went to Europe and spent a year in travel and &he study of the German language. In 1871 he came to Pulaski and began the study of law in the office of Judge Thomas M. Jones. In the same year he wedded Harriet P. JONES, of Pulaski. They have one child-Marietta. December, 1871, he was licensed to practice law, and in May, 1877, he was appointed by Gov. Porter, as one of the three railway assessors for the State. In 1878 he was elected to the State Senate from the counties of Giles, Lawrence, Lewis and Wayne, and was chairman of and member of important committees. In 1879 he was appointed State visitor of the University of Tennessee, and delivered the annual address before that institution. September, 1879, he was appointed special attorney for the State and is now engaged in the practice of his profession. He has been a life-long Democrat, and has occupied many positions of public trust and has presided over one of the State conventions of his party. He is one of Giles County’s most prominent men. Mrs. Ewing is a member of the Episcopal Church.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

WASHINGTON R. DICKERSON, farmer and stock-raiser, residing in the Thirteenth District of Giles County, Tenn., near Buford’s Station, was born in Lynchburg, Va., October 21, 1811, and is a son of Terry and Nancy DICKERSON, who were born in the “Old Dominion” and were married about 1805. Mary K., Allen A. and Washington R. are their children. The father died in 1818 and the mother in 1813. Our subject came to this State when a small lad, with some relatives, and settled in Maury County, where his education was very much neglected. He has farmed from boyhood, and in 1838 settled on a farm of his own. He owns 600 acres of as fine land as Giles County produces, besides 235 acres in the Fifteenth District and some valuable property in Pulaski, all of which he has made by his own good management and industry and the aid of his wife, who is in every sense of the word a helpmate. In 1843 he married Mary J. STONE, and eight children have blessed their union: Sarah K., Ophelia S., William A., Mary J., Betsy S., Rosa B. S., Washington R. and Jeffie. The family are Presbyterians, and our subject is a Democrat and of Irish lineage.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

20. March 2014 · Write a comment · Categories: Biographies · Tags: ,

THOMAS E. DALY, of the firm of Moore & Daly, at Elkton, Giles Co., Tenn., was born March 16, 1859, son of Thomas B. and Martha A. Daly, whose natal States were Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. They were married in Giles County about 1844, and four daughters and three sons blessed their union: Mary V., Ella N., James W., Frederick R., Thomas E., Annie L. and Florence E. The father and mother died in 1873 and 1869, respectively. Thomas E. obtained his education principally at Oak Hill, Tenn., and in 1877 was engaged as clerk by A. D. Bull & Co., and remained with that firm until January, 1881, when he bought out Mr. Bull’s interest in the business, and the firm is now known as Moore & Daly. January 2, 1881, Mr. Daly was married to Georgie Bull, daughter of Richard Bull, of Epton, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South at that place. Our subject is a Democrat and of Irish descent, and belongs to an old and highly respected family.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886