Frank HEIDLINGER, was sentenced to the penitentiary from Giles county at the July term of the Circuit Court, at Pulaski, and was taken by the Sheriff to Nashville, arriving last Saturday morning, and before he had changed his citizens clothes for those of the prison, was shot and killed by M.L. PHELPS who had been a guard at the prison for twenty years. PHELPS escaped.


Source: Whig & Tribune. 26 August 1871. Available online at Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers.

PINK M. EZELL, dealer in stoves, tinware and house-furnishing goods, is a native Pulaski, Tenn., born January 19, 1860, son of P. H. and Mary Ezell, old and prominent settlers of this county. Our subject is one of ten children, and is of Scotch-French descent. He was educated in the Pulaski schools, and when about sixteen years of age became salesman in the grocery store of W. R. Craig, and later clerked in a stove and tin store, and continued in this capacity until 1880, when he began business for himself, and has continued successfully in the stove and tinware business up to the present time. Mr. Ezell has made his own way in life, and is one of the prosperous young business men of Pulaski. In 1882 he united his fortunes with that of Mattie McCord, daughter of W. L. McCord, ex-editor of the Pulaski Citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Ezell have two daughters, named Mary and Margery. Mr. Ezell is a Democrat, and he and wife are church members.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

23. March 2014 · 1 comment · Categories: Biographies · Tags: , ,

WILL S. EZELL, county court clerk, is a native of Pulaski, Tenn., and a son of P. H. and Mary A. (Shields) EZELL. The father was born in this county in 1816, and his mother was also born in this county in 1827. The Ezell family came to Giles County in 1808, and is one of the pioneer familes of this part of Tennessee. Our subject’s birth occurred December 16, 1847. He was educated in Giles College, and in 1864 enlisted in Company K, First Tennessee. After the war he engaged as clerk in a store and for some time as book-keeper. He then engaged in the mercantile business for himself. In 1878 his father was elected county court clerk and our subject served as deputy county court clerk for four years. In 1875 he was united in marriage to Ada FAUST, of this county, and the fruits of this union were four children: Otis M., Mary A., Edith and John F. In 1882 Mr. Ezell was elected county court clerk and has since held that office. He is a thorough practical business man and has made a good officer. He is a Democrat and a Knight Templar, Pulaski Commandery, No. 12. He came of an old and well respected family, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

HON. Z. W. EWING, lawyer, a native of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of L. A. and R. A. (Leeper) EWING, and of old Scotch-lrish Presbyterian stock. His father was born near Athens, Ga., in 1809, and his mother in Bedford County, Tenn., in the same year. The father was a merchant and farmer and for many years was one of the leading magistrates of Marshall County. He died in 1853. The mother of our subject died in 1877, in Marshall County. Mr. Ewing was the seventh of eight children. During his youth his summers were spent on the farm at labor and in the winter season he attended the country schools. In 1859 he was a student at the Lewisburg M ale Academy, and in 1860 went to Maryville College, in East Tennessee, where he remained until the breaking out of the war. He then joined Capt. R. H. McCrory’s company, afterward Company H, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was promoted to lieutenant by commission, but served in the capacity of captain and major for two years. He was captured at Petersburg, Va., in 1864, and was confined under retaliation in the prisons of Fort Delaware, Fort Pulaski, Hilton Head and Sullivan’s Island, upon the southern coast. He was released in 1865, and came home and resumed his studies. In 1866 he entered the University of Virginia, and there remained until the summer of 1868. In the fall of that year he taught school at Richmond, Tenn. In 1870 he went to Europe and spent a year in travel and &he study of the German language. In 1871 he came to Pulaski and began the study of law in the office of Judge Thomas M. Jones. In the same year he wedded Harriet P. JONES, of Pulaski. They have one child-Marietta. December, 1871, he was licensed to practice law, and in May, 1877, he was appointed by Gov. Porter, as one of the three railway assessors for the State. In 1878 he was elected to the State Senate from the counties of Giles, Lawrence, Lewis and Wayne, and was chairman of and member of important committees. In 1879 he was appointed State visitor of the University of Tennessee, and delivered the annual address before that institution. September, 1879, he was appointed special attorney for the State and is now engaged in the practice of his profession. He has been a life-long Democrat, and has occupied many positions of public trust and has presided over one of the State conventions of his party. He is one of Giles County’s most prominent men. Mrs. Ewing is a member of the Episcopal Church.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

WASHINGTON R. DICKERSON, farmer and stock-raiser, residing in the Thirteenth District of Giles County, Tenn., near Buford’s Station, was born in Lynchburg, Va., October 21, 1811, and is a son of Terry and Nancy DICKERSON, who were born in the “Old Dominion” and were married about 1805. Mary K., Allen A. and Washington R. are their children. The father died in 1818 and the mother in 1813. Our subject came to this State when a small lad, with some relatives, and settled in Maury County, where his education was very much neglected. He has farmed from boyhood, and in 1838 settled on a farm of his own. He owns 600 acres of as fine land as Giles County produces, besides 235 acres in the Fifteenth District and some valuable property in Pulaski, all of which he has made by his own good management and industry and the aid of his wife, who is in every sense of the word a helpmate. In 1843 he married Mary J. STONE, and eight children have blessed their union: Sarah K., Ophelia S., William A., Mary J., Betsy S., Rosa B. S., Washington R. and Jeffie. The family are Presbyterians, and our subject is a Democrat and of Irish lineage.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

20. March 2014 · Write a comment · Categories: Biographies · Tags: ,

THOMAS E. DALY, of the firm of Moore & Daly, at Elkton, Giles Co., Tenn., was born March 16, 1859, son of Thomas B. and Martha A. Daly, whose natal States were Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. They were married in Giles County about 1844, and four daughters and three sons blessed their union: Mary V., Ella N., James W., Frederick R., Thomas E., Annie L. and Florence E. The father and mother died in 1873 and 1869, respectively. Thomas E. obtained his education principally at Oak Hill, Tenn., and in 1877 was engaged as clerk by A. D. Bull & Co., and remained with that firm until January, 1881, when he bought out Mr. Bull’s interest in the business, and the firm is now known as Moore & Daly. January 2, 1881, Mr. Daly was married to Georgie Bull, daughter of Richard Bull, of Epton, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South at that place. Our subject is a Democrat and of Irish descent, and belongs to an old and highly respected family.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

 

WILLIAM J. HOWARD, is a son of John W. Howard, who was born in Butler County, Ky., in 1804, and came to Tennessee in 1825, and a few years later married Jane H. Butler, who was born in Giles County, Tenn., in 1809. The father was a farmer and died August 2, 1882. His wife died at the old homestead in 1875. William J. was the second of nine children, and was born in Giles County, Tenn., June 7, 1831. His preparatory education was obtained in the common schools, after which he took a course in Giles College, Pulaski, Tenn. He began farming for himself when about twenty-one years of age, and has followed that calling through life, and owns 518 acres of good land. March 3, 1859, Amanda M. Poor, of Logan County, Ky., became his wife, and of eight children born to them seven are living: George W., Drury R., Isaac B., Edward W., Berilla R., Amanda E. and Tennessee. Mrs. Howard was born June 12, 1837, and is the daughter of George A. and Berilla (Howard) Poor. Our subject served in the late war in the First Tennessee Cavalry, under Col. Wheeler, and was captured and taken to Jeffersonville, Ind., where he was paroled. Mr. Howard is conservative in his political views and belongs to the Masonic fraternity.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

ROBERT N. HERBERT, M. D., is a native of Williamson County, Tenn., his birth occurring near the village of Brentwood September 27, 1842, son of Robert N. and Elizabeth (Cummins) Herbert, and of English origin. His parents were born in Davidson County, Tenn., the father in 1811, and the mother in 1814. Of a family of nine children our subject is the fifth. He spent his boyhood days on a farm and in attending the common schools. At the breaking out of the late civil war he enlisted in Company B, Twentieth Tennessee Infantry, and served four years to a day, participating in some of the most hotly contested battles of the war. He began the study of medicine upon his return home, under Dr. B. W. Carmack, and graduated from the Nashville Medical College in 1867, and the same year located at Campbellsville, Giles Co., Tenn., where he has since been a successful practitioner of the healing art. December 14, 1867, he was married to Wessie Reams, who died September 2. 1874. November 14, 1876, Dr. Herbert married Kittie Rogers, and four children have blessed their union: Robert C., Mary Wessie, Annie L. and Sallie E. Dr. Herbert is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

ROBERT A. HAZLEWOOD may be mentioned as one of the prominent and successful farmers of Giles County, Tenn. He was born in Campbell County, Va. January 15, 1822, and is the second of nine children of Little B. and Rachel (Walker) Hazlewood. His early education was obtained in the common schools. At the age of nineteen his inclination drew him westward, and he lived in Alabama two years, then came to Tennessee and followed farming and carpentering in Giles County. November 2, 1843, he married Amanda M. Hazlewood, daughter of Mitchell Hazlewood, and these children Mitchell F., Rachel W., Ann Eliza, Sarah 1. (deceased), and Lucretia were born. Mrs. Hazlewood died December 17, 1851, and our subject married Serena S. Hazlewood, daughter of John Hazlewood. Henry, Thomas, William W. (deceased), John F., Allen W. and Felix S. are their children. Our subject’s grandfathers, Hazlewood and Walker, were born in Virginia, and were Revolutionary soldiers, and his father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Robert A. served in the late war in the Fifty-third Tennessee Infantry, and was captured at Fort Donelson, and for seven months was a prisoner in Indianapolis. In March, 1862, he was discharged on account of age. Mr. Hazlewood is a Democrat from principle and education. He owns 160 acres of good land, and he and wife and four children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886

HON. THOMAS B. HARWELL, a retired physician of Giles County, is the son of Gilham and Annie Harwell, natives of Virginia, who immigrated to Tennessee when quite small. They were married in 1820, and this union resulted in the birth of seven children: Sarah E., Thomas B., Samuel G., Annie W., Alfred F., Mary A. and William G. The father died in 1838, and the mother is still living. Our subject received his education in the Wurtenburg Academy, at Pulaski. In 1844 he commenced the study of medicine with I. J. Pepperson, of the above town, and in the fall of 1844 entered the Louisville Medical College, and attended one course of lectures. In 1850 he commenced the practice of medicine, and was engaged in this profession until 1867. He then abandoned his practice, and has since been devoting all his time to agricultural pursuits on the farm where he now resides. He has 600 acres of excellent land, all well improved, which is six miles south of Pulaski, near Harwell’s Station. He has been a rather successful man in all his undertakings, and is regarded as a prosperous and industrious farmer. In 1875 he was elected to the Legislature from Giles County, and was re-elected to the same in 1879, representing Giles and Lincoln Counties. He is a Democrat in politics, a member of the F & A. M. fraternity, and is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has also taken an active part in educational affairs of Tennessee, and is one of Giles County’s leading citizens.


Source: Goodspeed’s History of Giles County, 1886